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  • Update: Graduated Rider Training and Licensing

    For your interest:








    GRTL Project update April 2011


    Following on from the publication of the consultation report, the Graduated Rider Training and Licensing (GRTL) project team have been progressing a number of components identified for the Regulation phase of the project.

    New motorcycle handbook for WA

    Extensive research from other states and international jurisdictions has assisted in the development of a new Motorcycle Rider's Handbook for WA called 'Ride Safe'.
    The GRTL team acknowledges Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria who granted permission for Western Australia to use material from their motorcycle publications. Contributions from local industry representatives in WA have also been invaluable.


    'Ride Safe' is scheduled for release in the coming months. It will include topics on;





    Computerised Theory Test (CTT)



    Following the release of the 'Ride Safe' handbook, a new motorcycle theory test is scheduled for completion later in 2011. The CTT will include;
    • 200 motorcycle related questions and answers;
    • 35 questions from various categories across the 200 questions will be used to formulate a CTT ;
    The selection of questions will be random, a certain percentage coming from the 'Ride Safe' 'handbook. Questions will be multiple choice and answered by motorcycle licence applicants.






    If access to a computer unavailable, a selection of printed questions will be provided to cater for indigenous and remote communities.

    Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme and a Power-to-weight classification

    Still targeted for implementation in 2012, the submission paper to trigger legislative change is progressing. The paper compares the models used in NSW and ACT to determine how with modification to suit local conditions, such a model could be implemented in WA.
    Arrangements for mopeds and motorcycles propelled by electric motors and access to three wheel vehicles will also be considered.
    An essential part of the process involves an evaluation and contribution from industry and the public. Please look out for your chance to comment on the proposal when it is released on our website.








    WA rider competency standard

    A previously proposed competency standard for motorcycle riders in Western Australia has recently been reviewed and is currently being formatted for endorsement to complement the new 'Ride Safe' handbook.
    In addition to the Department of Transport (DoT) sections of Driver Standards, Customer Services and the GRTL team, a number of stakeholders from the instruction industry, Police Service, and other government agencies have all contributed to the review of the document.
    Public release is expected shortly after the handbook is published.

    Electronic headset communications



    To make more use of the time available during practical assessments on motorcycles, the GRTL team has also completed a trial of electronic 'bluetooth' headsets. The trials concluded that the use of these devices is the way forward in that:
    • Candidates not following instructions or getting lost is virtually eliminated;
    • Frequent stops and interruptions were diminished;
    • The use of the same routes for testing could be reduced due to an increased travel range;
    • There was more time to conduct a valid assessment; and
    • Noise and congestion complaints from residents would reduce because of broader route choices.
    A business case is currently being formulated to recommend a roll-out to all the Department's assessors.

    Mopeds

    A review of new moped rider arrangement has made steady progress in terms of developing an understanding of the demographics and crash statistics for WA.
    Intended as a basis for further consultation with the industry, the development of discussion materials and compilation of research from other parts of Australia is underway.
    Supporting this will be the completion of research publications for example "Understanding and preventing injuries to motorcycle and moped riders" (Queensland).

    Returning riders

    Understanding the demographics and crash statistics for this group in WA is almost complete. A paper outlining possible options for the department to help manage this group is currently being reviewed.
    A complete range of options and their impacts have been captured and include varying from more robust approaches such as retesting and legislative change to softer approaches such as provision of educational materials and liaison with clubs and organisations.

    Feedback welcome

    We are continuously looking for ways to improve our communication with the community. If you have any suggestions for information you would like to see included in the next Newsletter, or added to the GRTL websiteplease share your ideas with us via the GRTL in box.
    The project team looks forward to your continued support for the GRTL project.
    Best wishes from,
    Luke Wardell
    Project Manager GRTL


    "Live Long and Prosper"

    Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

  • #2
    At least when LAMS is introduced CBR250's will get a bit cheaper.
    Originally posted by Desmo
    Why be a cunt about it?

    Comment


    • #3
      agree with LAMS or not, at least they're finally doing something! The wheels of progress move so farking slowly around here.

      Comment


      • #4
        Not sure about the practicality of electronic 'bluetooth' headsets.

        I wouldn't be keen to stick earphones in my ears that had been used by many other licence candidates before me. Also, depeding on the helmet, they may not be easy to fit and retain when pulling helmets on and off.
        "Live Long and Prosper"

        Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

        Comment


        • #5
          They have speakers mounted inside the helmets mate.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by WhiteNoize View Post
            They have speakers mounted inside the helmets mate.
            Oh so when people come to do their test they have to use the DPI's helmets do they?

            Or will every new learner be expected to hardwire speakers into their helmets?

            "Live Long and Prosper"

            Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

            Comment


            • #7
              How would one "hard wire" a bluetooth unit to a helmet? I have a bluetooth that can stick to the side of my helmet with a 3M style sticky pad on the outside of the helmet, and attaching to a speaker that has velcro that would hold the lining of most helmets.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ryven View Post
                How would one "hard wire" a bluetooth unit to a helmet? I have a bluetooth that can stick to the side of my helmet with a 3M style sticky pad on the outside of the helmet, and attaching to a speaker that has velcro that would hold the lining of most helmets.
                I am talking about 'hardwiring' the speakers that someone suggested would need to be fitted to a helmet.

                If you think this is not a problem, you must have a very loose helmet or very small ears or both.

                I often find even earplugs touch the lining of my helmet and can get dislodged when putting my helmet on or pulling it off.
                "Live Long and Prosper"

                Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

                Comment


                • #9
                  The helmet I was talking about was a Medium Arai (last time I used it). The fit was what you'd hope for when the helmet was sold to you and fitted by a former employee of Arai. I had no issue wearing canal headphones, but I did spend the extra money on a quality set that did not protrude further than my ears... Which is more than I can say for most ear plugs.

                  The speaker unit caused no issues, probably because it didn't have to be dead inline with your ears/ear canal for you to hear it clearly, and it was thinner than the average person's ear would be, so assuming the helmet fit wasn't suffocatingly tight, you'd have no issues.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ryven View Post
                    The helmet I was talking about was a Medium Arai (last time I used it). The fit was what you'd hope for when the helmet was sold to you and fitted by a former employee of Arai. I had no issue wearing canal headphones, but I did spend the extra money on a quality set that did not protrude further than my ears... Which is more than I can say for most ear plugs.

                    The speaker unit caused no issues, probably because it didn't have to be dead inline with your ears/ear canal for you to hear it clearly, and it was thinner than the average person's ear would be, so assuming the helmet fit wasn't suffocatingly tight, you'd have no issues.
                    Everything is too easy for you Ryven, but having taught 1000s of students, I'll bet the task of fitting speakers into prospective licence candidates' helmets will prove not so easy a task in practice.

                    Then there is the problem of where to put the bluetooth unit. I can imagine it would be a big issue if during the test it came loose and ended up dangling by the speaker wires somewhere near the whirling rear wheel.

                    Even if they got around that, I can imagine this exchange:

                    Assessor (in thick accent - whether cockney or anglo-indian): "Watch out! A car is changing lanes into you!!"
                    Student:"What was that?! I can't hear you! Say again!!"
                    (wobble, wobble, CRASH!)

                    "Live Long and Prosper"

                    Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Would hate to be the unlucky person who would have the batteries die on them, but a better option in the big scheme of things
                      "Democracy means simply the bludgeoning of the people by the people for the people"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My bluetooth setup takes about 30 seconds to uninstall and install on another helmet.

                        It clamps on with a clip and phillips screw, so it doesn't mark the helmet, and the speakers do not move, and barely touch my ears.

                        Not sure why you're dismissing the whole idea because of this.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SOLID View Post
                          Would hate to be the unlucky person who would have the batteries die on them, but a better option in the big scheme of things
                          I would hate to be the unlucky person whose headset was paired to Ryvens.
                          Being an Australian is not an excuse for being dumb and racist.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by WhiteNoize View Post
                            My bluetooth setup takes about 30 seconds to uninstall and install on another helmet.

                            It clamps on with a clip and phillips screw, so it doesn't mark the helmet, and the speakers do not move, and barely touch my ears.

                            Not sure why you're dismissing the whole idea because of this.
                            Because I am a professional motorcycle instructor and I have tried using 2 way headsets in the past and decided they were more trouble than it was worth. (and then sold the heasets in the Quokka)

                            Granted, everything can be made to work really well when you are used to the equipment - but it is a different story with beginner riders who already have their hands full with riding the bike and concentrating on the road. I don't know about you but I wouldn't want someone shouting in my ear when I was trying to keep my mind on the task at hand (and shout they would have to, to be heard over the noise of the engine, wind and traffic).

                            Many licence candidates get to the test already shaky with nerves, the last thing they need is to try to fit up new, untried equipment to their helmets and learn to use it on the spot (and then have someone shouting in their ear for the whole test).

                            The only solution would be to make it compulsory got everyone taking a motorcycle test to arrive with their own bluetooth equipment ready to pair with the assessor's - and that will be unlikely to happen.

                            Oh, and what do you do with hearing impaired people? (And a person doesn't have to be legally impaired to struggle to hear over a crappy bluetooth headset)
                            Last edited by Spock; 08-04-2011, 07:33 PM.
                            "Live Long and Prosper"

                            Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darkfibre View Post
                              I would hate to be the unlucky person whose headset was paired to Ryvens.


                              And doesn't he work at a Licensing Centre?!
                              "Live Long and Prosper"

                              Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

                              Comment

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