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  • Have Burn-outs Burnt out?

    I have just found this article on bigpond about banning burnouts at the racetrack so it will make the roads safer on the roads.

    Have burn-outs burned out? - News - BigPond Sport

    By Ben Hocking

    The big question

    After Shane van Gisbergen won his first V8 race on home soil in New Zealand in April, he spent several minutes on the track thrilling fans with his burn-outs. In doing so, however, he drew the ire of V8 officials, as he missed part of the live-to-air podium.

    At Perth, drivers were warned that performing burn-outs and doughnuts was specifically against category regulations and would be subject to penalty in future. The top three drivers in Perth then went on to ignore race officials by doing burn-outs and were reprimanded for their actions.

    Officials have since backed down on the ban, allowing winners to burn rubber if they wish to celebrate in this way. But has the time come to ban the practice at V8 races?

    For

    The V8 category must be very careful to send the right message if it is to maintain government support - essential to the sport's survival. With hoon driving constantly in the news, banning celebratory burn-outs and doughnuts at V8 Supercar races would go a long way to sending a message to young drivers that the practice is unacceptable.

    V8 Supercars CEO Martin Whitaker is cognisant of this fact, stating after his Perth backflip: "We then need to ensure it is not something we are encouraging people, particularly young people, to do outside of a racing environment."

    Not only are burn-outs a safety issue on the roads, but there is also a question mark over their safety on the track. While no-one has been hurt yet by a driver's celebrations, the possibility is often there. After Bathurst, fans rush immediately onto the track to make their way to the podium presentation; safety marshals also move onto the circuit after a race. Someone could easily be collected by an out-of-control car.

    Aside from all the safety concerns, officials have legitimate concerns that burnouts will eat into their free-to-air schedule. In the wake of the AFL's $1.25b television rights deal with Channel Seven, the sport will increasingly need to keep everything running to time for its host broadcaster.

    Against

    Drivers criticised the ban as a crackdown on drivers showing their emotions after a race victory.

    Garth Tander, one of the three drivers reprimanded in Perth, was outspoken after the event in his criticism of the ban: "We’re not allowed to show any emotion and put on a show for the people who pay the money to come watch us race."

    The other main reason for retaining burn-outs as a victory celebration is to keep the fans happy. There is no questioning the popularity of drivers who perform burn-outs or doughnuts, as they are usually greeted by cheers and applause from the crowd.

    Jim Beam Racing's Steve Johnson agreed that the fans expected to see burn-outs. "They want us to put on a good show and be fan friendly, but they’re banning all this stuff. It’s what the fans want to see," Johnson said.

    Our verdict

    The banning of burn-outs would send a strong message to the community that the category is serious about promoting a road safety message. In the long-term this would also have the effect of making the sport more palatable to a mainstream audience, who at the moment consider it solely the preserve of rednecks and revheads.

    Drivers who think doing burn-outs is the only way to celebrate a race win should watch more Moto GP racing - specifically races where Valentino Rossi or Jorge Lorenzo greet the chequered flag first. These two have made celebrating an art form, each trying to do outdo the other with their outlandish post-race feats.

    And fans who get excited by drivers winding on the brake bias of their cars and who love watching spinning wheels fail to gain traction should go and watch drag racing.

    The views in this story are those of the author and not necessarily those of BigPond Sport.
    What a load of bull shit i take it this guy has never been to the track or ever had fun in life to write something like this...
    Goldmember
    Banned User
    Last edited by Goldmember; 20-05-2011, 11:20 AM. Reason: Added Quote

  • #2
    So burn-outs is bad hoon behavior but driving at excessive speed and racing others is ok? Cool

    Comment


    • #3
      Hahahaha

      Not only are burn-outs a safety issue on the roads, but there is also a question mark over their safety on the track. While no-one has been hurt yet by a driver's celebrations ...
      Wow fuck, I can think of some things, like a big fucking wall of tyres at Barbagello's, that actually DO kill and HAVE killed people. But shit, we'd better ban burnouts first, in case someone is killed, much higher priority.

      On a lighter note, as more sports adopt an X engines per season rule, you'll see less burnouts. On a personal note, I never pull burnouts on the track because I generally race on fresh rubber then use the same tyres for practise and cause I haven't won squat since 2009

      Comment


      • #4
        Damn I need to be paid to troll like that.
        For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
        For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

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        • #5
          Drivers who think doing burn-outs is the only way to celebrate a race win should watch more Moto GP racing - specifically races where Valentino Rossi or Jorge Lorenzo greet the chequered flag first. These two have made celebrating an art form, each trying to do outdo the other with their outlandish post-race feats.
          Dont they do 100 meter long wheelies?

          Does that mean if we do wheelies its actually art and not a hoon offence?

          Steve

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          • #6
            Stoner's standup on the weekend was nothing to sneeze at
            For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
            For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Stavtech View Post
              Dont they do 100 meter long wheelies?

              Does that mean if we do wheelies its actually art and not a hoon offence?

              Steve
              Well its looking that way

              If a cop pulls you over just say you are perfecting you art in wheelies

              Comment


              • #8
                Yet I distinctly remember a certain moto GP winner cocking up jumping in a lake to celebrate, which could have had some pretty severe consequences. Better ban that shit straight away before some retard thinks it is a good idea and tries it at home. It's motor racing, of course it's going to appeal to "rev-heads", that's the target audience you cocktard. If you think giving the target demographic what they want is bad buisness, then I weep for whatever poor bastards employ you.
                Filbert on Moto Guzzis;
                Originally posted by filbert
                it's like a ducati with the motor put in sideways for people who are too scared of the power of harley davidsons

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                • #9
                  In the long-term this would also have the effect of making the sport more palatable to a mainstream audience, who at the moment consider it solely the preserve of rednecks and revheads.
                  Wow they think that if there is less celebratory burnouts, classier people will watch the v8 supercars.

                  Holy shit. It's still the same thing. Why are burnouts seen to be SO evil in Perth?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Drasius View Post
                    Yet I distinctly remember a certain moto GP winner cocking up jumping in a lake to celebrate, which could have had some pretty severe consequences. Better ban that shit straight away before some retard thinks it is a good idea and tries it at home. It's motor racing, of course it's going to appeal to "rev-heads", that's the target audience you cocktard. If you think giving the target demographic what they want is bad buisness, then I weep for whatever poor bastards employ you.
                    +1

                    also if racers/drivers never traded paint or pushed it til they lost control it would make for some pretty banal seasons. It would be like NASCAR without the pileups.
                    sigpicSome days you're the pigeon, some days you're the statue.

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                    • #11
                      Wish I was the age I am now in the 70's/80's.
                      This day and age, with all the bullshit legislation and laws do my fucking head in.

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                      • #12
                        I wish I was the age I was in the '80's.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I thought the only reason they didn't do burnouts any more in moto gp was because of the engine restrictions.


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                          • #14
                            Don't you think the author of the article is just towin' the line? He would have been told what slant to write the article in relation to the proposed ban. "More palatable to a mainstream audience", perhaps they would be interested in bus racing because the 'mainstream audience' he speaks of don't enjoy cars whatsoever, they might have a car that takes them places but they're not passionate about cars.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bikes still do the occasional burnout, and Stoner's stand-up wheelie must have been close to 400m long (if they showed the whole thing), and he's not the only one to do them.

                              My favourite is Troy Corser's celebratory nac-nac on the back straight at Laguna Seca years ago, on the Suzuki, I think. It's the wheelie I always aspire to do but can never get myself to lift the weight off my foot.
                              2006 Yamaha R1SP;
                              In an interview with the New Scientist magazine marking his birthday, Stephen Hawking was asked what he thought about most during the day, and replied: "Women. They are a complete mystery."
                              Amen, brother. Amen.
                              My nemesis; Barfridge

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