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  • High kms

    Hi folks new to the site so this is my first thread, what kilometres is to high for a sports bike eg r1 r6 gsxr/600/750/1000, i know a lot of it comes down to how well its been serviced and maintained but they are just machines with lots of fast moving parts at the end of the day anybody had much experience with high kms on sports bikes any info would be appriciated

  • #2
    i havnt seen many sports bikes for sale over the past year for 60k km+
    Originally posted by Rich...
    You got me in trouble...

    Comment


    • #3
      Most people seem to think they need a rebuild after 20,000kms. In reality judge the bike on an individual basis and see what you think.

      Comment


      • #4
        In theory, if you replace everything that needs it as it's due, the kms aren't going to matter. In reality, once you start to approach the 40k mark you start to lose the interest of a lot of buyers unless you drop the price. The best advice I can give you would be: look at the service history, which services have been done, which services are due soon and how much will they cost. From there it's a matter of how long you plan on keeping it, and how much you can afford to lose over that time frame.

        The reality of the matter, mind, is the mining boom has given birth to a lot of late model bikes with owners who rarely get the time to ride them. So if you're getting a bike with high kms, make sure it's reflected in the price.

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        • #5
          My CBR600RR has 90,000 on it.

          It's had the normal oil, filters, tyres, chains, sprockets, brake pads.

          Nothing else,

          Still fine.
          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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          • #6
            Oh.. And fork seals.

            But nothing that wasn't in the book, other than a warranty thing on the intake air control valve.


            Sports bikes get written off before they die in the vast majority of cases.
            “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by thro View Post
              My CBR600RR has 90,000 on it.

              It's had the normal oil, filters, tyres, chains, sprockets, brake pads.

              Nothing else,

              Still fine.
              Yeah, but... It's a Honda.

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              • #8
                I think gryphen had a zx7 with over 100,000 on it before?
                “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ryven View Post
                  In theory, if you replace everything that needs it as it's due, the kms aren't going to matter. In reality, once you start to approach the 40k mark you start to lose the interest of a lot of buyers unless you drop the price. The best advice I can give you would be: look at the service history, which services have been done, which services are due soon and how much will they cost. From there it's a matter of how long you plan on keeping it, and how much you can afford to lose over that time frame.

                  The reality of the matter, mind, is the mining boom has given birth to a lot of late model bikes with owners who rarely get the time to ride them. So if you're getting a bike with high kms, make sure it's reflected in the price.
                  Heed this advice. ^^^^

                  An engine is an engine is an engine.

                  A diesel motor can last a million k's or 200 000 , all depending on the service history and the way it was driven.

                  Most high performance engines fail due to excessive high revving or very high Octane fuels which are generally corrosive and dilute the lubricants [ie stuff like Nitro Benzine but as far as I know Caltex don't sell the stuff. ]

                  The main detrimental effect on a high mileage bike is the resale price only.
                  Sventek, being a predominantly lazy fuck can you please purchase some for me, bring me the stuff, create something I want after you think of it for me then clean my house, wash my car, dog, bike breathe for me.

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                  • #10
                    If its a Honda it will rust away before it wears out
                    If its a Yamaha it will get written off before it wears out
                    If its a Kawasaki it will have depreciated to $0 before it wears out.
                    If its a Suzuki it will get stolen before it wears out.

                    Maintain them and they last forever.

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                    • #11
                      Ducati?
                      Sventek, being a predominantly lazy fuck can you please purchase some for me, bring me the stuff, create something I want after you think of it for me then clean my house, wash my car, dog, bike breathe for me.

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                      • #12
                        Many here have heard it before, and I'm sure there are more case examples, but going on 70,000 km's on a daytona 675 and it's never skipped a beat. (dead battery issues not included )
                        :stupid:

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                        • #13
                          ^^ yeah it's not out of the ordinary.


                          And to clarify with my bike...

                          Every traffic light is a GP start. First gear regularly taken out to the 15,500 limiter. Every time i take off from lights on say Tonkin or Roe (and I commute via both). Its one owner, and I've been doing that to it since as soon as I didn't shit myself doing it - so probably over 85,000km.

                          It's been ridden in the rain, on gravel (also in the rain ), taken through sand (cutting across vacant blocks of land, etc.), dropped, etc.

                          Change the oil and filters often enough and do the major services, and a proper sports bike motor is no less tough than a car motor. Probably MORE tough, as they're designed with the race track in mind, as opposed to a car which is generally designed to commute.

                          In terms of piston speeds (which causes most of the load inside a motor), bike motors are very short stroke, so say, 15,000 rpm on my 600 is less stressful to the motor than say 7000 rpm in a Nissan Silvia, because it has less than half the stroke. Sport bike motors also often come with forged internals, weight reduction on internal parts taken to the extreme, etc.

                          If you do manage to kill a bike motor while riding on the street, I'd be very surprised, so long as scheduled maintenance is performed.
                          Last edited by thro; 23-10-2013, 01:12 AM.
                          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Andyw86 View Post
                            Most people seem to think they need a rebuild after 20,000kms. In reality judge the bike on an individual basis and see what you think.
                            WTF....

                            most bikes don't even require a valve shim check at 25k let alone a rebuild.

                            My 07 R1 is due a freshen up which is rings and guide seals and maybe some white metal bearings at 60k.

                            All the gearbox bearings will more than likely be fine.
                            Atlas Performance, dyna pumps, " your name goes here"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arwon View Post
                              WTF....

                              most bikes don't even require a valve shim check at 25k let alone a rebuild.

                              My 07 R1 is due a freshen up which is rings and guide seals and maybe some white metal bearings at 60k.

                              All the gearbox bearings will more than likely be fine.
                              Trying to explain that to some people isn't easy. They simply don't know

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