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Tips for purchasing 2nd hand first big bike.

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  • Tips for purchasing 2nd hand first big bike.

    Hi Crew,
    I feel I've done my homework, I have read the article in the classifieds section on buying a second hand bike and it will be of great use. I've got my heart set on a 2004/5 GSXR 750 as parts are readily available and it won't break the bank if I accidentally WOT and find myself in orbit.
    Google has led me to deffinatley check out the conditions of the Recitifier, stator & Throttle body stepper motor as they seem to be common places of trouble.

    So my questions are; does anyone with experience on this specific bike have any input on things I should scrutinize whilst looking over ?

    And two, more of a general question. What's a motorcycle good for in way of Km's ? For example if a 2004 has 55xxxkm's should I be more inclined to go for a 2005 with 45xxxkm's ?
    I understand this question may invoke opinions only however I would greatly appreciate mechanically minded input.

    Thank!

  • #2
    if the 2004 has 55,000 highway kms and is well maintained i'd take it over the 2005 with less from a 50km commute to work and the chain dragging on the ground
    Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

    when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

    Comment


    • #3
      Low kms is no guarantee that a bike has been well cared for or properly serviced, much like high kms is also not a true indication of how worn out a bike is.

      Look at service history, if it's only done 5000km and is 5 years old, have the service intervals still been upheld? There is a reason why they state x amount of km or months between servicing.

      If you have concerns about the stator or rectifier, it is unlikely to be evident when you turn up to look at a bike, as it's not as obvious as a worn out chain or tyres at the end of their life.

      When looking at a bike, before even starting it check out a few things, first thing I look for is the condition of the chain, you can tell a lot about a motorcycle owner just by looking at the condition of their chain. Is it clean, well lubricated and tensioned correctly? Or is it as loose as a street walking prostitute in Kings Cross? Does it have dry links and lube baked onto it from 5 years ago (also like the Kings Cross prostitute). How a motorcyclist looks after their chain is a fairly good indication as to how they look after the rest of their bike.

      Before you start it check the oil level, and touch the engine cases to see if they are hot or cold (this may give you an indication if the guy had been spending the past 3 hours to get it running and let it warm up so that it starts first time when you get there).

      Also turn up 15 minutes early, as he may be there trying to get the thing going, or it's still sitting on a battery charger.

      Have a look under the seat, is the full tool kit still there, again how well a rider takes car of the finer details is an indication to the rest of the bike.

      Research the bike model and year so that you know where every decal should sit and the orientation of it (the amount of R1s I have seen missing the Yamaha decal on their tail, or even upside down). Good indication of repair work from a crash.

      Dig deeper if you feel you need to, ask if the owner can take off a fairing panel, so you can look under it, if they get offended, they may have something to hide. How clean a bike is under there again is a decent indication as to how well they look after it.
      Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

      Comment


      • #4
        Always trust your gut if something seems a bit off and you don't like the answer the seller gives you, just remember there will always be another bike!

        Otherwise if you really want piece of mind, mobile mechanics like Derek Ball do on site inspections.
        Last edited by Pagey; 04-02-2014, 12:05 PM.

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        • #5
          I reckon the chain is a good window into how the rest of the bike has been maintained. Dry/rusty chain means the rest of the more complex maintenance has probably been ignored too.

          A well lubed chain does not indicate a well maintained bike however, it only works the other way, it's a one way window

          Comment


          • #6
            Have a listen to the motor after starting it up. It may have a few rattles at the start but that's ok. If the rattles persist after she's warmed up then there is good chance there's something wrong.

            Go for a ride and check the brakes as you'll need these with a big bike. Check for a wobble as you brake as it may be warped discs ( not sure if it is a Suzi thing but other bikes have this problem.) and a new set will set you back a bit.

            Check second gear for noises or differences well as this is usually the wheelie gear.

            Casually slip in a conversation about the life of the bike. Is it for weekend racing, casual rides or commuting etc. it'll give you some idea of how the bikes been treated.

            Most important if your not confident then take someone with you as some problems are an easy fix and you may score a good bike or you'll miss something and be up for a bit of your hard earned.

            Plus Dont let high miles set you back if it's well kept. I got my zrx for less than 5k with 50000 on the clock and it will easily do 200000km from reports from other owners who have done those Kms. Hasn't been a prob yet.

            Good luck.
            Ninety nine percent of the people in this world are fools. The rest of us are in great danger of contagion.

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            • #7
              Tips for purchasing 2nd hand first big bike.

              Thank you very much lads, as of today I'm the proud owner of a 2005 gsxr750 20th anniversary Edition.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just to re-iterate the high km thing... engine-wise as long as a bike has been serviced, the engine will often out-last the bike (bike will be written off first)

                There are a shitload of bikes out there with <50,000 km, and >10,000 km is considered "high" mileage by some.

                10,000 km is just about run in (judging from how my honda freed up when it had the 12,000 km service), and mine has hit 92,000 km (highest kay moderator bike? ) and is still going strong.

                If you do plan on doing a heap of kays yourself, maybe buying something no one else wants because it has, say 20,000km + on it will save you a heap of money.
                “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                • #9
                  I keep eyeing that red zx12 in the for sale section... I've had a block-mounted poster of a green one in my bedroom since I was a teen so it's a bit of a childhood dream bike... my hesitations are 1) It would have to be garaged for at least a year until I get my R class, 2) It has about 60,000kms, 3) It's red, 4) I can't even test-ride it to know if it feels right for me 5) No-one else seems interested in it so I wonder why that is... I *could* just spend the next year waiting for a green one to show up...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by black500r View Post
                    4) I can't even test-ride it to know if it feels right for me
                    Licence to ride a motorcycle >660cc or 150kW/t

                    Under Getting started

                    You can apply for a licence to ride an R class vehicle once you have held a licence to ride an for a minimum of 12 months.
                    There are three steps involved in obtaining a licence to ride an R class motorcycle.
                    Please note: you do not require a learner’s permit to learn to ride an R class motorcycle however you must display ‘L’ plates and be accompanied by an approved supervisor, and you must an authorisation to ride an R-E class vehicle.

                    Just saying...

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                    • #11
                      Oh... I know that... but I don't think anyone with a working brain would shadow me to test ride a ZX12R and I don't think I'd even want to test ride it myself. It'd just look cool in my garage... or maybe I could hang it up on my bedroom wall

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by black500r View Post
                        Oh... I know that... but I don't think anyone with a working brain would shadow me to test ride a ZX12R and I don't think I'd even want to test ride it myself. It'd just look cool in my garage... or maybe I could hang it up on my bedroom wall
                        My brain works....

                        Sometimes....

                        I'd shadow you, you're a big boy and make your own choices after considering consequences, right?
                        Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                        when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If it's still for sale in a couple of weeks I'll hit you up ;-) Bring pop-corn and bandages

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It's better to buy the bike you want and learn to ride it than buy the bike you think you should....

                            I've made that mistake about 30 times now, they're the times my brain isn't working
                            Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                            when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My only advice is to buy a good bike on the cheaper end of the scale, it is a big jump in power and handling over lams/250s, I didn't want to bin an expensive bike so I bought a cheapy to learn on, get something nicer when I have more experience under my belt

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