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  • Blow outs

    I was riding on the freeway today and a bus in the left lane 3 seconds in front had a tyre blow out was then left wondering if any one has experienced a blow out on their bike???

  • #2
    nope but fuckin' near come to grief avoidin' truck re tread delamination offerings
    faster ya go closer to nirvana

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Biffer View Post
      nope but fuckin' near come to grief avoidin' truck re tread delamination offerings
      PSN- DOOOM666

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      • #4
        Sorry I meant an actual tyre blow out on their bike?

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        • #5
          A mate has before at somewhat more than legal speed.

          He's still here
          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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          • #6
            Just wondering how common it is I have had a tyre bow out a car but was wondering if it was very common on bikes

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            • #7
              Thank god Thro

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              • #8
                Yep, riding to Darwin on a Katana 1100 didn't realise the metal chain guard had snapped flipped over and wedged between the sprocket and the wheel. The mounting arm of the chain guard cut the side wall away and blew out the tyre at about 130kph. Fortunately I kept it upright and limped the next 60km into a town appropriately named "Turkey Creek".
                A bit of a hint, if you think something is dragging or creating resistance against your forward motion, don't wait until the next fuel stop to check it.

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                • #9
                  Blew out a front entering a corner...

                  The exit was rather interesting as the bike was running wide and I used a lot of body language to stop it, only just, from leaving the bitumen...

                  As I straighten up I thought "that was weird" then realised the bike was handling crap so pulled over...

                  Massive hole in the side of the tread, like a bolt had opened it up...

                  Rode about 10km on the flat to make it to a servo...

                  Not something I want to experience again, although it wasn't scary as it happened, afterwards I realised just how lucky I was to have not gone those few more inches and touched the gravel, it would be all over then and I would have been in the trees...

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                  • #10
                    Rear tyre blew will riding with girl friend at the time on my CB250. Slight wobble going down hill doing about 70kmph. Lucky enough to be 500m from servo. No mechanic on duty but assistant opened workshop and allowed me to use tools.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rich... View Post
                      Blew out a front entering a corner...

                      The exit was rather interesting as the bike was running wide and I used a lot of body language to stop it, only just, from leaving the bitumen...

                      As I straighten up I thought "that was weird" then realised the bike was handling crap so pulled over...

                      Massive hole in the side of the tread, like a bolt had opened it up...

                      Rode about 10km on the flat to make it to a servo...

                      Not something I want to experience again, although it wasn't scary as it happened, afterwards I realised just how lucky I was to have not gone those few more inches and touched the gravel, it would be all over then and I would have been in the trees...
                      Just curious would it be like a car riding on a flat where you'd more the likely have to replace the entire rim? Or being a bike is it not heavy enough to do damage like that?

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                      • #12
                        If you move your weight away from the flat tyre and do about 60, the rim doesn't touch the ground at all and the bike is able to be ridden though handling is interesting and corners are not fun...

                        car steel rims survive, but I wouldn't try it on mag wheels...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by elb94 View Post
                          Just curious would it be like a car riding on a flat where you'd more the likely have to replace the entire rim? Or being a bike is it not heavy enough to do damage like that?
                          While you have speed up they hold their shape just flex and wallow a lot more, but as you slow they put weight on the beads and will cut through and damage rims

                          If you're going to limp it to the next town it's actually better to do it at 60 than 20 if you can handle it.
                          Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                          when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

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                          • #14
                            Had the rear go flat at 180. All I did was slow down to 100 and keep riding for 10k's until I got to a servo where I could put a temp plug in.
                            You put the c*nt in country run

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by elb94 View Post
                              Just curious would it be like a car riding on a flat where you'd more the likely have to replace the entire rim? Or being a bike is it not heavy enough to do damage like that?
                              The Katana ran tubed tyres so it isn't quite so much of an issue as it is upon a tubeless rim. Only about a third of the right hand sidewall was still attached in my incident and the my goal was to keep the rim rolling on the tyre whilst maintaining some kind of useful speed. The bike used pretty much all the lane and rolling around the lane whilst also watching for traffic closing up behind was a real eye opener. In the end they rim suffered no damage and all was good.

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