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  • Pillion practice?

    so i have been riding for about 4 months now and now feel comfortable enough to start taking a pillion, i was just wonderin if there was anyway that you could practice without having anyne on the pillion seat. i know how the CoG will change and that accelleration and performace will be affected. but i would just like to know what its like before somene jumps on te back.

    cheers alex
    sigpic
    Its so small

    http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...e_view&id=9156

  • #2
    I dont know how you can simulate taking a pillion, but when you take your first pillion, make sure its someone who'll trust your riding, and wont move around. The worst part is trying to turn, and the pillion is leaning the other way. The whole dynamics of the bike change. Also, take the gear changes as smooth as possible otherwise you'll end up knocking helmets like i constantly did lol.

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    • #3
      braking is heavily affected. Depending on the bike a lot more forces will be thrown forward when you hit the brakes.

      You want to work on making your gear changes extremely smooth.

      make sure your pillions protective clothing is a standard that you would wear on the bike.

      Sort out your signals for stop, slowdown before you go anywhere as it will be hard to hear them yelling over the engine. They need to know that they should not be moving around, especially at slower speeds.


      Practive in a large carpark first off

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      • #4
        Find yourself an EXPERIENCED pillion, that way at least one of you has experience with 2 on a bike.
        Feed 'em to the pigs, Errol....

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        • #5
          Just started taking a pillion myself in the last month. Yeah if they move around, especially at slow speed it can be a bit of a surprise as it throws the direction off a little bit and you need to correct. Just explain to them that the bike is supposed to lean and to just stay like a dead weight in the middle of the bike. Youre not going to impress anyone with hard acceleration and braking, make everything smooth and gentle and they will relax a lot more and gain more confidence in you
          the universe is hostile

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          • #6
            Tell her to get her own bike.
            Or remove your pillion pegs, problem solved.

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            • #7
              If you do decide to take a pillion, make sure that you agree on some "stop" signal before heading out, because neither of you will be able to hear anything the other says.

              Also, make sure that they know where you're going to go and if you're going to detour off the road down footpaths etc that they know it's going to happen.
              “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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              • #8
                I'm not sure you can take a pillion after riding for a few months. Unless its a few months fully licenced. Or for instructional purposes. If my comments don't apply to your situation and you can take a pillion, start with short slower rides and work up to building your confidence as well as you pillions. Once you become co ordinated with your pillion it can be quite good riding. But I prefer not to have one, hence my pillion unfriendly bike.

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                • #9
                  Brake alot earlier and slower than usual. Make sure they know when you're abot to take off. Don't split. When taking off take off slowly. Make sure they know not to lean. Take corners at slower speeds than usual. Be prepared to feel EVERY bump in the road.

                  Originally posted by Tornado View Post
                  I'm not sure you can take a pillion after riding for a few months.
                  I was giving my sister lifts to uni 2 weeks after I got my REs. Mind you, she's like half my weight and small.

                  Oh that's another thing, avoid anyone heavy to begin with (ie. generally best to avoid blokes)
                  DISCLAIMER: I is an idiot

                  "Physics is: - like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it.
                  - to maths what sex is to masturbation"
                  -Richard Feynman

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                  • #10
                    I took a pillion on the back of my road/trail with no license at age 14 or so - off-road.

                    As said, just make sure you take it *real* easy until you get used to it.


                    No showing off or heroics! Whoever it is on the back will be most unimpressed if it ends with the bike upside down...
                    “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by voided View Post
                      Brake alot earlier and slower than usual. Make sure they know when you're abot to take off. Don't split. When taking off take off slowly. Make sure they know not to lean. Take corners at slower speeds than usual. Be prepared to feel EVERY bump in the road.



                      I was giving my sister lifts to uni 2 weeks after I got my REs. Mind you, she's like half my weight and small.

                      Oh that's another thing, avoid anyone heavy to begin with (ie. generally best to avoid blokes)

                      Hence why i will never ever pillion............. Bro just take it slow with who ever you pillion its all part of the learning curve..........

                      BIGFELLA

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                      • #12
                        make sure your pillion is wearing the same, or more gear than you. you'll feel better if you ever come off.

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                        • #13
                          hahaha... I took my gf on the back of my bike 2 DAYS after I got my licence... I didn't know there was some sort of limitation that should be applied - I simply wanted to show her the mentality of drivers and what to expect. It was an eye opening experience for her. Having ridden pillion for years I knew what to expect, but it's a little different being in the front. I started off taking her through back streets with no cars on it, getting used to stopping distances and forces, balance of the bike and acceleration, and I did everything very gently before relaxing in to more normal riding.

                          One thing that she kept on doing that I really didn't like was relaxing her grip around my waist while I was riding. It's quite unnerving to know that if I launched the bike she'd be launched - off the back. Had to keep pulling her hands around. If they have their hands on the grip rails at the back, that's different, but it was unnerving knowing she wasn't really hanging on to ANYTHING much.

                          My personal rules for taking a pillion:
                          1. If they're hanging on to you, tell them to hang on tight and tell em why. It's mainly for the peace of mind of the person in front.
                          2. They lean with you. They don't lean right when you lean left. Smack on the helmet for anyone that goes against that, even a chick. Explain that if you were going in a straight line, and the pillion leaned right, the bike would turn unless the other rider countered - brings a whole new definition to back seat driver.
                          3. If they're looking over your shoulder so you don't butt heads, stick to one side only - it's just a minor balance offset, but it's unnerving to have someone that changes from right to left and back all the time.
                          4. They wear as much safety gear as I do. I ride with all the gear, all the time (see sig for my gear), so they do too - jacket, helmet, jeans an absolute minimum for the safety gear. Don't have all of that? Walk home or catch a taxi.

                          I'm not saying that you should do as I do, go riding with a pillion almost straight after getting your licence. I knew what to expect with the past experience as a pillion, and have some advanced driver (but not rider) training. I also feel very confident on my bike, and was confident about taking a pillion on.
                          Dual sport riders do it in the dirt

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                          • #14
                            cool thanks for the info guys ill just start out with small trips and build up from there or maybe just wait till i get off the 250 =).

                            cheers alex
                            sigpic
                            Its so small

                            http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...e_view&id=9156

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                            • #15
                              i always tell pillions 'do not fall off', and leave it at that. Its an uncomplicated instruction and if they follow it, its all sweet.

                              +1 on the gear, i will not take a pillion who isn't geared up with a minimum of jeans, ankle covering boots and i supply the riding jacket either my spare or my own.

                              first time we take off, if they are inexperienced they are usually holding on pretty tight.. so i nail it to instill fear in them, of sliding off the back of the bike. A scared pillion is one who is hanging on tight. I also brake pretty damned hard as well, to give myself a chance to adjust to the increased braking distances and to also to give the pillion a chance to figure out the stopping thing.

                              One thing that pillions complain to me about is fatigue, it is apparently very tiring hanging on. Don't forget that your pillion might not have the fitness to hang on for an extended period. i have had pillions crying about aching shoulders for weeks after ride.
                              Originally posted by Bendito
                              If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

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