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PSB Roadcraft classroom.

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  • PSB Roadcraft classroom.

    So motorcyclists are dieing on our roads and some very knowledgeable people on this forum have buckets of wisdom they can share to help keep us younger guys alive.


    I can't add much to the conversation so this is basically a request for the more experienced guys on the forum to address issues they see with younger riders.


    Ask questions in here without being ridiculed.


    Hey the thread will probably die but meh.




    Some statistics:
    • More than 26% of all motorcycle accidents involve riders with less than one year's experience.
    • Ninety-two percent of riders involved in reportable accidents are untrained (i.e. they were self-taught or learned from friends or family).
    • Motorcycle riders between the ages of 16 and 24 are significantly over-represented in accidents.
    • Twelve percent of ALL motorcycle accidents involve alcohol, but HALF of all the FATAL motorcycle accidents show ALCOHOL involvement..



    THE S I P D E TECHNIQUE
    Scan, Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute--the mental process suggested by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.
    • SCAN--Always be looking. Your eyes should follow a rotational pattern including mirrors, controls, and the road ahead. Scan for potential hazards as well as opportunities.
    • IDENTIFY--Identify the situation ahead. Hazard or opportunity? Vehicle, pedestrian, animal, or stationary object? Each category presents its own challenge to the motorcyclist.
    • PREDICT--Anticipate the hazard or opportunity. What will be the situation by the time you get to it? Predict what might happen and visualize escape routes. This is the part of SIPDE that depends most upon your knowledge and experience.
    • DECIDE--Make a choice from the available alternatives. Single hazard or multiple hazards? Blow your horn, flash your lights, adjust your speed (slower or faster), adjust your course--or some combination of these? What you decide depends upon the road conditions, your bike, and most important, your skill level.
    • EXECUTE--Do it! Take the action necessary to avoid the hazard. Generally this means increasing the "envelope of safety" surrounding your motorcycle.
    If you can keep the bike where the hazards aren't, a cold beer upon your safe arrival becomes a distinct probably.

  • #2
    top stuff mate
    For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
    For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

    Comment


    • #3
      Actually after reading this http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...r-roads-47091/
      Its probably all covered (i was put off by the title) lots of great stuff in there.

      I will sift through later and quote the bits and bobs i believe a worthwhile, so theres no yada yada just tips.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Shane - all in a single thread is a great idea.

        So.. all you experienced riders what is your number 1 tip to stay safe on the road?

        Mine:

        ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS do a HEAD CHECK before changing lanes, or otherwise moving across a flow of traffic... ALWAYS

        Comment


        • #5
          PSB handbook made up from the collaboration of all the knowledgable people.

          Who wants the job of editing it together?

          (This is me claiming immunity.)

          What is best in life? Troll the forums, see the threads derailed before you and hear the lamentations of the moderators.

          Comment


          • #6
            Headcheck is your best friend.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CitizenD View Post
              PSB handbook made up from the collaboration of all the knowledgable people.

              Who wants the job of editing it together?

              (This is me claiming immunity.)
              I will do it.

              Comment


              • #8
                How about we do a wiki?

                That would be an ideal resource for all the questions that keep popping up. Anyone have any experience running these? I'm willing to help out, but have no idea where to start.
                For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
                For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by barfridge View Post
                  How about we do a wiki?

                  That would be an ideal resource for all the questions that keep popping up. Anyone have any experience running these? I'm willing to help out, but have no idea where to start.
                  Great idea jeff, i too have no clue but more than happy to do the leg work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shane1 View Post
                    I will do it.
                    Stupid, stupid man. Good on you though, and good luck.

                    Well, that's my involvement over with.

                    What is best in life? Troll the forums, see the threads derailed before you and hear the lamentations of the moderators.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ken Oath View Post
                      Yeah, what they all say.

                      Just on what Desmo says, many years ago when living in Melbourne, and before I started riding, read an interview with a Vic motobike copper about the dangers to motorcyclists.

                      He said he always watches the heads of drivers, because before they change lanes, there's usually a slight tilt of the head.
                      It's the driver kidding themselves that they've looked before they change lanes.

                      It's something I remembered and saved me once or twice.

                      Good luck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A good idea shane1, there are plenty of tips out there. Here's mine.

                        Do an advanced road course
                        Always do a life saver check (head check)
                        Ride sensibly to the conditions and to the congestion on the road
                        Use some common sense
                        There is always a time and a place, choose it wisely, cos it might cost you more than your license.

                        I also want to share this little advert used in a skydive presentation I saw. It read,......


                        "Learn from the mistakes of others,......................You won't live long enough to make them all yourself!"

                        Pepper
                        #56 COMLECK Racing - Superstock & B-Grade -
                        Aseeda Engineers & Designers www.aseeda.com.au
                        Pro-Flo Motorcycle Improvements
                        Motorcycle Panel & Paint
                        McCulloch Suzuki www.mccullochsuzuki.com.au
                        COMLECK Pty Ltd (Electrical)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DTM View Post

                          "Learn from the mistakes of others,......................You won't live long enough to make them all yourself!"
                          Great quote.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Practice Defensive Riding and stay Alive

                            Keep a safe following distance of 2 sec in city traffic, 3 – 4 sec on highway.

                            Lead with your eyes, your eyes guide you, “Where you look is where you go”.

                            Identify your path of travel when approaching corners. Scan the road surface before you turn to avoid traction problems

                            Use “reference points” on frequently traveled routes to avoid hazard areas.

                            Spot potential hazards and respond; Adjust speed, path of travel or honk to get attention.

                            Plan your route to make correct lane choices and/or a safer / easier route in advance.

                            Move your eyes every 2 sec. See what is happening and deal with it accordingly.

                            Scan beyond the road. Look through parked cars, sidewalk to sidewalk. Spot activity / movement that might affect You

                            Gather information in advance; use your mirrors every 5 – 8 sec and before you enter intersections.

                            Give yourself room, a space cushion. Don’t let yourself get boxed in without an “out”.

                            Scan 3600 in all 6 directions (front, back, left, right, up, down). Problems can come from anywhere.

                            Use the lane of least risk. Ask yourself: Can I see them? Can they see me? If the answer is no, change lane position or lanes

                            Avoid other driver’s blind spots. If you can’t see them in their mirror, chances are they can’t see you.

                            Get attention when needed by using your horn.

                            Cover your clutch, brake and horn in doubtful situations.

                            Scan left, center, right at intersections and before taking off from a stop.

                            Establish a “point of no return” when approaching a stale green light. Gather information beforehand (mirrors –what is behind you).

                            Never enter an area without room to exit. Intersection, driveway, etc.

                            Give yourself room. At least one motorcycle length behind stopped vehicles. Check you mirrors to see if the driver approaching from behind has noticed you or given you space.

                            Communicate effectively with other road users. (electric signals, hand signals or lane position).

                            Ensure momentary valid eye contact with other potential problems (drivers, pedestrians). Do not look too long, keep your eyes moving.

                            Ride in the daytime with your headlight on high beam. Have consideration for your fellow drivers though (tunnels, low light situations, sunrise, sunset).

                            At night use your lights to get attention. At a stop you can tap your brake a few times (to activate brake light) when drivers are approaching from behind.

                            Be assertive not aggressive, take your position on the road. Don’t give others opportunities that might place you in danger.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe an obvious one... but....


                              If you can't see around the corner, don't *assume* nothing is there. Also, don't push to 100% on the road - it's not a controlled environment, and you may need some turning/braking ability or "oh shit" space in case of the unforseen - make sure you have something left in reserve.
                              “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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