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Cornering confidence – all in my head?

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  • Cornering confidence – all in my head?

    Inb4 show that bitch a wheelie, I’m looking for a little advice.

    Been trying to get my cornering confidence up by gradually increasing entry speed and turning/speed on a tight little 90-left-90-right s-bend near my house (familiar, good visibility, perfect road surface), and I’ve hit a bit of a problem.

    My worry is that I don’t have the confidence to increase speed (or take a later entry point) any further without knowing I can pull the bike round fast enough and flick it over to the other side to make the second turn without ending up in the gutter or the other lane. (I’d estimate the road at 4m wide)

    And I’m worried that if I flick it over too fast, I’ll end up turning too tightly, and ending up on the gutter anyway because I’m unable to stand the bike up.

    So I’m asking for any general advice on the subject (to someone who’s basically been riding for six weekends), and also asking what the best thing to do is if you turn in too fast to stand the bike up a little. Countersteer back up? Roll hard on the throttle? A touch of front brake? (The last one I’m guessing is stupid, but I thought I’d throw it in there too lol).

    Cheers in advance.
    Originally posted by Dragunov-21
    If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

  • #2
    It's not about entry speed so much as it is about corner speed.
    Stop trying to concentrate on punching it in quickly and concentrate on your form through the corner, also, go practice somewhere without curbs, they hurt.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do a trackday or advanced riding course.
      Best value 'modification' you can do imo.
      Originally posted by Desmo
      Why be a cunt about it?

      Comment


      • #4
        yep, +1 for ahg/rac course, im heading there when i get the open class and next bike, from all accounts it helps a lot.


        Comment


        • #5
          Focus on your line and dont worry about speed. And keep practising. The more you practice, the better you will get, and more confidence you will have

          And as above: Trackday or Advanced Riding Course.
          MSN: pinkygirl_999 at hotmail dot com

          Can't you tell that this is all just a contest,
          The one that wins will be the one that hits the hardest!

          Comment


          • #6
            Fuck, I knew that'd be the response lol...

            Guess I'm gonna have to get myself some proper pants and start saving.

            In the mean time...

            Originally posted by Desmogod View Post
            It's not about entry speed so much as it is about corner speed.
            Stop trying to concentrate on punching it in quickly and concentrate on your form through the corner, also, go practice somewhere without curbs, they hurt.
            Cheers Jim, I guess my problem there is that they're super-short/tight corners (a bit like a 90 degree city corner), so there's no time/distance to actually increase speed through them.

            Guess I'll go find myself some better roads lol

            Dammit, wish I lived in Perth, I need a shadow to watch me ride a little and give me some advice.

            Guess I'll see if Nathan is willing to risk going for round two after last time lol
            Last edited by Dragunov-21; 11-08-2009, 10:21 AM.
            Originally posted by Dragunov-21
            If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

            Comment


            • #7
              IMO corners will see you wreck your bike faster than any other activity.

              Corners on the track and your daily corners are pretty safe as you know every bump on them but unknown corners will probably put you down faster than any other road activity besides outright stupidity.

              Sure they are fun but just make sure you weigh up your options before you go out there pushing as super hard as possible.

              On one hand you get low and go " yay me!" on the other hand you crash possibly hurt yourself and lose a lot of money.

              I have always considered corners to be the most risky ( cornering hard I mean) and in 6 years I have never come off. It may be luck that I havent but my point is if you ride like a bit of a pussy for a few years you will be richer and safer.

              When I first started a older biker said to me " Do you want to ride for a good time, or do you want to ride for a long time" ie ride like a mad cunt for a year and possibly crash or ride for 20 years safely. That has pretty much set my tempo ever since.

              In terms of your corner work on your body position and lines slowly and just build up more and more speed as you do it, dont try and do it as fast as possible, build up the speed gradually.
              My mum always used to say, when life hands you lemons "kill mob within spell duration with a soul gem of adequate quality for the mob's level to trap its soul"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by redfern View Post

                When I first started a older biker said to me " Do you want to ride for a good time, or do you want to ride for a long time"
                are those^ mutually exclusive?
                Originally posted by Bendito
                If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  ^^Just to clarify, I'm not pushing hard (hell, I've only got about 30-40 hours experience), just trying to fix a problem I have.

                  If I enter a turn and it feels faster than I thought it would, my instinct is to freeze, rather than turn deeper.

                  No idea if it's common for new riders, indecisive riders (who I imagine either change quickly or get hurt), or just me, but it's why I ran/slid off the road and busted my collarbone, so it's an instinct I'm gonna have to break.

                  I don't plan on pushing my limits, or the bike's, or the road's (not on public roads, at any rate, I just personally figure it's too risky, given the possibility of encountering another vehicle/person/animal with little time to respond), but if I make an error, I want to make sure that I can use the extra lean (or whatever skills the situation demands) that I'm keeping in reserve and pull through, rather than freeze up and break more bits off myself and my bike.
                  Originally posted by Dragunov-21
                  If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by g0zer View Post
                    are those^ mutually exclusive?
                    Not if you get Turbor1's Dildo bike seat.

                    You know how it is though, if we were invincible we would have a lot more fun and ride a hell of a lot harder, but reality means you cant have maximum fun.
                    My mum always used to say, when life hands you lemons "kill mob within spell duration with a soul gem of adequate quality for the mob's level to trap its soul"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dragunov-21 View Post

                      Guess I'll go find myself some better roads lol

                      Dammit, wish I lived in Perth, I need a shadow to watch me ride a little and give me some advice.
                      If you can't find good roads in Tassie there is something wrong or you don't know your way round. I live in Perth these days and enjoy it, but I wish I could have put some of the Tassie twists in my suitcase.

                      In terms of corners. Practice, practice and you need to have a plan. Real basic terms = Set your entry speed, have a specific turn in point, have a specific apex point to head towards, and have a specific place you want to be aiming for once you pass your apex.

                      Start out slow, get to know that corner (where the oil stains are, cracks, paint, whatever) and develop a plan. Once you are happy at that pace, refine your reference points in the corner. Can you turn in a little later, apex later, get on the gas earlier once past the apex?

                      You will have more confidence in a plan that you believe will work than just rocking up to a corner quickly and chucking it in. I gained a lot from reading Twist of The wrist 1&2 and Soft science of road racing.

                      My 2c anyway.

                      Where in Tas are you anyway?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The ARD was really good, but its focus is on low speed bike control (a good thing, of course), and it's a lot more about how to stop/recover/evade traffic. It doesn't spend that long on techniques for actually going faster. The level 1 trackday appears to aimed more at this, as one would expect, being a racing introduction.

                        Having just been to the track for the first time... it's amazing. I can't understate how much more room you have to play and work on things there than on the streets. If you like riding hard, prepare to spend lots of $$.

                        Even for what you're doing though, I think you can still work on it bit by bit where you are. I won't give you advice on what to do, as I've just proven my body positioning on the bike still needs a lot of work. But I really enjoy the fast left/right switchups (possibly my favourite riding manouvre), and the way you shift on the bike and flick it around. If you're concerned about the narrowness of the street you're working on, I think you should be able to go to a decent sized roundabout and use that to practice, while allowing yourself more room for error. Consider that a roundabout entry is left, around the roundabout is right, and then the exit is left again. Envision a curve from the right hand lane, to the left hand lane in the middle, and then exiting straight on the right again (of course when there's no traffic).


                        *I'm not saying don't do the ARD. It's an excellent course and well worth doing for learning how to stop in all sorts of conditions.
                        Insert witty comment here

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wilson View Post
                          But I really enjoy the fast left/right switchups (possibly my favourite riding manouvre)
                          +1

                          i like watching GP riders go through the tight S- dragging elbow over one ripple strip at maximum lean angle then whip the bike over to seemingly instantly maximum lean angle while hitting their line so accurately they are dragging elbow across the next ripple strip
                          Originally posted by Bendito
                          If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tornado View Post
                            If you can't find good roads in Tassie there is something wrong or you don't know your way round. I live in Perth these days and enjoy it, but I wish I could have put some of the Tassie twists in my suitcase.

                            You will have more confidence in a plan that you believe will work than just rocking up to a corner quickly and chucking it in. I gained a lot from reading Twist of The wrist 1&2 and Soft science of road racing.

                            Where in Tas are you anyway?
                            Haha, I'm not saying I can't find good roads, I've just been taking it pretty easy and leaving myself a LOT of room on roads I'm not familiar with, so I haven't been able to enjoy them as much as I'm sure is possible.

                            I've been reading the section on turning/steering in volume 2 every friday since I binned lol, and it's been a big help.

                            I'm in Hobart monday to friday-arvo (no bike), and home in Launceston friday-night to sunday-night (ride every chance I get).
                            Originally posted by Dragunov-21
                            If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ye forget about entry speed i went in to a corner a little too hot last week and ran wide and clipped the curb scared the shit out of me lol.
                              Our Father, Who art at Phillip Island, Hallowed be thy name
                              Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done
                              In the backroads as it is on the freeway
                              Give us this day our high-octane premium fuel
                              And forgive us our lanesplitting
                              As we forgive the four wheel drives, the volvos and the taxis
                              And lead us not into gravel corners
                              But deliver us from hand-held radars
                              For thine is thy leather, thy denim, thy Gore-Tex and thy Kevlar
                              Amen ORIGINAL POST BY DEB

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