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  • Few Qs

    Few questions for PSB, thanks in advance for the help

    1. I already pay rego for my car licence, is the R-E licence a separate fee?

    2. Can I get some feedback from riders on the real safety hazards out there for a casual, weekend rider? I'm considering taking lessons and getting the usual safety concerns from family & friends, just want to suss out fact vs. fiction.

    Cheers

  • #2
    yeah the Re licence is a seperate fee as its a different rego number.

    i have only been riding a few months and i find a lot of dicks dont bother checking their blind spots before changing lanes. So i as a rule assume im invisable when riding

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    • #3
      re q 2: yes they (other road users) are all out to get you don't give them a chance.
      Harvey community radio has a motorcycling show listen over the web here www.harveycommunityradio.com.au ,Facebook here http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Mo...34691323302991 yes I am the goose that hosts it.

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      • #4
        To clarify:

        You will need to pay the appropriate fee for you learners permit and test.

        However, once you have the additional class(es) on your license, your license renewal will be the same cost no matter how many classes you have on it.

        On safety, i think the sport riding techniques book sums it up pretty well (paraphrased):

        Position yourself and take ownership of the road like you are a truck
        Be willing to yield that position as necessary like a bicycle.


        In other words, own your piece of the road, and ride to be seen - but assume you are invisible. But don't for one second think it gives you the right to fight a car for that piece of bitumen because the cager will win every time.


        If you are often being "surprised" by traffic in your car, or getting honked at, or rely on your horn... maybe bikes are not for you....
        “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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        • #5
          as above, RE is a different licence class, thus more money for the old dpi.

          You have to learn to premeditate the moves of drivers. Not always easy, but some you can pick a mile away that their not really concentrating, sort of oblivious to whats going on around them. And +1 for not being caught in drivers blind spots. Its always a gamble though. Its not always your fault when riding, it is the people that 'dont see you'. Just learn to anticipate as much as possible. The risk is high, but so is the reward


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          • #6
            Your biggest dangers will be:

            - Other road users either not seeing you, or trying to muscle you out. Predict the most stupid thing other road users are likely to do, and make sure you can escape if they do it. This includes keeping an eye in your mirrors when stopped at a light to make sure no-one's gonna run up your ass.

            - Watch for shit on the road. Oil, debris etc, especially in a corner.

            - Water. When it's wet, you can't lean so far, and the painted lines on the road feel as if they're covered in KY. No reason not to ride in the rain, but just be careful.

            - From personal experience, coming into a corner feeling faster than you thought you would, and freezing up. I did it, ran off the road and busted my collarbone. Take things slowly, gradually build up your confidence, if that's the kinda person you are, and at some point, get in a trackday, so that you know how far you can push your bike before things get hairy. It'll give you a load of knowledge and confidence that'll help you on the road.

            One last thing - until control inputs (steering/braking etc) become second nature, which takes road-time, you'll be slower to react. Give yourself the space/time buffer so that you don't find yourself panicking.
            Originally posted by Dragunov-21
            If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

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            • #7
              1 is a poorly worded question. You pay for your license, but won't have to pay extra for your bike license once you have it. You will have to pay for the learners and getting the RE license, and rego for both your car and bike if you buy one.
              If cleanliness is next to godliness, why was jesus a dirty sandal-wearing beardo?

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              • #8
                "If you ride, YOU WILL DIE!!!" - Exagerated, but I hear this kinda shit a lot from family and friends.

                Off the top of my head, although bikers make up only 4% of the road users, they make up about 17% of the fatalities. Can find the exact stats if you want.

                There is an increased risk in major injury or death when riding a motorcycle, even with the risk mitigating techniques mentioned by other members above. It is your choice as to whether this risk is acceptable, not only for you, but for the ones that could potentially lose you.

                I have only been riding 6 months, after years of humming and harring. All I can say is, i wish I got my license years ago when I first considered it. I accept the risk. I may change my mind when I have kids, etc. But I don't think I could give up riding now that I have started.
                Originally posted by Roger Explosion
                Running giveway signs is not hooning. Only dangerous actions like reving your engine is...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Argon View Post
                  "If you ride, YOU WILL DIE!!!" -

                  Ha Ha if i had a dollar for every time someone has said that to me i would be rich rich rich

                  I have only been riding 6 months, after years of humming and harring. All I can say is, i wish I got my license years ago when I first considered it.

                  Me too .
                  Its good that you are asking questions and calculating the risks, but dont let people scare you out of it if its something you really want to do. You never know you might find after a few lessons that its not your thing, some do. But at least they gave it a go and have no regrets.

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                  • #10
                    When I first told my parents and my brother that I'm gonna buy a bike, all I heard was a NO. But I just went ahead and bought one and never told them about it. Lotta people say lotta things about the risks of riding, and most of what they say is true. Riding can be risky. But I feel, its a risk worth taking.

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                    • #11
                      Doing anything in life involves risk. Take steps to minimise it, stay awake, learn to read traffic etc and you'll probably be fine.

                      it most certainly requires a lot more from you than driving a car though. if you're not feeling very alert, are pissed, pissed off, or otherwise not in a fit mental state to deal with it properly, don't get on the bike...


                      what might be a curbed rim or whatever in a cage could end up with you in hospital on the bike...
                      “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by alexperthsb View Post
                        Few questions for PSB, thanks in advance for the help

                        1. I already pay rego for my car licence, is the R-E licence a separate fee?
                        Just to clear this up, if you mean this:
                        I have already renewed my drivers license, will I have to pay for another drivers license one once I pass my R-E license?
                        The answer is no, the R-E class will be added to the dpi computer system and if pulled up the cops will see you hold the R-E class when they look up your details.

                        BUT if you want to renew early so you have R-E sitting on your card in your wallet, you can pay again.
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                        • #13
                          ^^ also, when you get the RE, you will get a piece of paper to certify this, for use until you get your new card.
                          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                          • #14
                            Great advice from all above. I've been riding for 5 yrs now and I have experienced most of the above, including being knocked off the bike by a cage 4x4 turning left from the right lane on Cambridge st about 3 years ago. Off bike for 6 weeks with completly torn ac ligament in my right shoulder, and torn calf mussle in left leg. But! I love riding and i could not stop if i wanted to. Theres something to be said about being out in the open and a feeling of being free. I ride because I love to and yes, you can die or be seriously injured but for me its definatly worth the risk. I accept it and I ride. Make sure its what you want to or dont want to and procced. Nobody can decide but you. Stay upright and watch any cage that comes within 50 meters of you at all times.......There craaaaazyyy
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