Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Valve Shimming Calculator to Make it Easy

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Valve Shimming Calculator to Make it Easy

    I gave a friend a hand to do the shims on his 2005 R6. He's bought another engine as it was cheaper than replacing the big end, rod, piston etc after it all let go at Collie last year.

    The new engine looks pretty good but for good measure we decided we should do the shims while the engine was on the bench. About 5 of his were out of tolerance.

    1. Have a partitioned box/container ready with 16 compartments ... a fishing tackle box or similar that's big enough to hold the valve bucket/cover and shim. Mark the compartments for Cylinder number and exhaust and inlet valves.
    2. Remove the rocker cover.
    3. Record the clearances of both the exhaust and inlet using a feeler gauge between the base wheel of the cam and the top of the valve bucket/cover and input the number in mm into the Excel calculator.
    4. If you have nothing out of tolerance then your done so replace the rocker cover.
    5. If some are out of tolerance then remove the cam chain tensioner.
    6. Remove the camshaft covers by starting at the ends and working inwards in a criss-cross pattern loosening the bolts a quarter turn each time.
    7. Lift off the covers and remove the camshaft.
    8. Lift off each valve cover using a magnet pick up tool and place it and the shim into your numbered box/container. Input the shim thickness into the Excel calculator. The shim will have a number etched into one face ... 182 is 1.82mm for example. If the number is unreadable use a set of vernier callipers to measure the thickness.
    9. The Excel sheet will calculate minimum and maximum value of the shim to be inserted to give the correct tolerance.
    10. Place the new sized shim onto the valve stem and replace the valve cover bucket for each of the 16 valves. You normally need a shim kit with a range of sizes for this project. Most Jap bikes use 7.48mm diameter shims.
    11. Smear some Moly grease onto the bearing surfaces and replace the camshafts and cam covers.
    12. Tighten the covers from the centre outwards in a criss-cross pattern a quarter turn at a time.
    13. Do the final tightening with a torque wrench. Usually about 10Nm to 14Nm.

    It's important not to get the valve cover buckets and existing shims mixed up so you need the partitioned container.
    Last edited by Scott52; 01-01-2014, 08:31 PM.
    I'll be riding for you #52, my dear son, Cameron Taylor Elliott 1985-2009
    2008 CBR600RR and 2010 GSXR750 Track Bikes, KTM530EXC Enduro bike wrist breaker

  • #2
    But the maths to calculate shims is so simple its worth doing as a brain exercise.

    Did you pull the shims from the old engine to try to avoid buying a kit?
    Being an Australian is not an excuse for being dumb and racist.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by darkfibre View Post
      But the maths to calculate shims is so simple its worth doing as a brain exercise.

      Did you pull the shims from the old engine to try to avoid buying a kit?
      Yes we did.

      The maths are simple but using a spread sheet calculator that we tested first to make sure it was error free made the job far quicker and less chance of making errors. You'd be surprised how many find it so complicated when it's straight forward.

      All we did was input the clearances and the existing shim size and the table gave us the thinnest and thickest shim we could install to be within tolerance. It's a better way of doing it trust me. However if people are happy to sit there with their oily fingers bashing away on a calculator that's not a problem. It's each to his own.

      If I could attach the Excel file to this post I will or I can send it to any interested parties.

      Unfortunately we ended up needing 4 x 198-200 shims that we didn't have.
      I'll be riding for you #52, my dear son, Cameron Taylor Elliott 1985-2009
      2008 CBR600RR and 2010 GSXR750 Track Bikes, KTM530EXC Enduro bike wrist breaker

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Scott52 View Post
        However if people are happy to sit there with their oily fingers bashing away on a calculator that's not a problem. It's each to his own.

        I wasn't suggesting a calculator, Use the pen and paper that was used to record the clearances.

        I suppose the only important thing is the end product after all.

        Another option in most manuals is a chart like this:
        Being an Australian is not an excuse for being dumb and racist.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey Scott,

          Do you really have to pull out the camshafts to change a shim?
          On most engines I've ever seen with valve shims, including a Yamaha XJ, you just use a pry tool to compress the valve spring a little and pull the shim out.
          What's so different about an R6?

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome to shim UNDER bucket.

            Shim over bucket are larger diameter 25mm + And shim under bucket are under 10mm diameter.

            Newer engines are tending toward using the bucket as the shim, and you have to change the whole bucket to a different thickness one. Toyota and Kia do this, but you need to measure every kia one as the stamped thickness does not always measure up as accurate.
            Being an Australian is not an excuse for being dumb and racist.

            Comment


            • #7
              It's been a long time since I did shims on a multi but I was thinking the other day that a spreadsheet would be handy when it comes to swapping the shims around. I remember I had a few spare shims and clearances the could be sorted by swapping shims over. I had a page full of calculations.
              -

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by darkfibre View Post
                I wasn't suggesting a calculator, Use the pen and paper that was used to record the clearances.

                I suppose the only important thing is the end product after all.

                Another option in most manuals is a chart like this:
                Yes the R6 manual my mate has had that table in it. I guess the difference is it gave us the minimum thickness and maximum thickness you could use. Also it's easy to make an error with the table by selecting the wrong column.

                Can you attach an Excel file to a post?

                - - - Updated - - -

                Originally posted by henrys View Post
                Hey Scott,

                Do you really have to pull out the camshafts to change a shim?
                On most engines I've ever seen with valve shims, including a Yamaha XJ, you just use a pry tool to compress the valve spring a little and pull the shim out.
                What's so different about an R6?
                As eluded to by Darkfibre just about all modern sports bikes have a bucket/cover that sits over the valve with the shim underneath. It's just not possible to remove that bucket without first removing the cams.
                I'll be riding for you #52, my dear son, Cameron Taylor Elliott 1985-2009
                2008 CBR600RR and 2010 GSXR750 Track Bikes, KTM530EXC Enduro bike wrist breaker

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought this was pretty clever...........

                  ذ?ذµر€رپذ¾ذ½ذ°ذ»رŒذ½ر‹ذ¹ رپذ°ذ¹ر‚ - Universal shim claculator (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki)

                  and having a .ru the .zip, .rar and .exe were virus free.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GreenMeanie View Post
                    I thought this was pretty clever...........

                    ذŸذµر€رپذ¾ذ½ذ°ذ»رŒذ½ر‹ذ¹ رپذ°ذ¹ر‚ - Universal shim claculator (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki)

                    and having a .ru the .zip, .rar and .exe were virus free.
                    I thought Kawasakis didn't need shims...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rich... View Post
                      I thought Kawasakis didn't need shims...
                      Only one valve out of 16 don't require them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've always used spreadsheets just because I am recording the numbers in there anyway - that way I can quickly see changes over time outside of overall trend for individual valves.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rich... View Post
                          I thought Kawasakis didn't need shims...
                          That's only because you replace the camshafts instead as they wear so quick
                          #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
                          Originally posted by Phildo
                          Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
                          Originally posted by filbert
                          i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

                          98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
                          Ozblackbird.net Administrator

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This is the best Valve shim calculator i have come across.
                            Triumph Universal Valve Shim Calculator Tool
                            Tutorial Valve Shim Calculator - no Excel required, Triumph optional. - YouTube

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here's the Excel Calculator I made when helping a friend do his R6. It's a keep it simple style rather than some of the rocket scientist versions out there.

                              http://rapidshare.com/share/9BD89CCB...F358154EF2F454

                              Hopefully this link to Rapidshare works for any interested parties.
                              Last edited by Scott52; 25-01-2014, 01:33 PM.
                              I'll be riding for you #52, my dear son, Cameron Taylor Elliott 1985-2009
                              2008 CBR600RR and 2010 GSXR750 Track Bikes, KTM530EXC Enduro bike wrist breaker

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X