Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do you adjust chains?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do you adjust chains?

    I realise this probably seems like a stupid fucking question but I've only ever owned shafties fot the last 20 years.

    In my dim dark memory the method was to tighten it until it has about an inch and a half free play. Is that right?

    Also, are sports bikes any different to chook chasers?

  • #2
    25mm free play...better looser than tight and use a vernier gauge on the end of the adjuster block to make sure. Also use a second spanner on the adjuster bolt when you tighten the lock nut to prevent it turning...always recheck when done as they tend to appear right until you tighten the spindle/axle bolt.
    Smoke me a kipper...I'll be home in time for breakfast

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by BusaSteve View Post
      25mm free play...better looser than tight and use a vernier gauge on the end of the adjuster block to make sure. Also use a second spanner on the adjuster bolt when you tighten the lock nut to prevent it turning...always recheck when done as they tend to appear right until you tighten the spindle/axle bolt.
      Pretty much although I think my manual says 30mm but it also says while standing upright NOT on the stand
      #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
      Originally posted by Phildo
      Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
      Originally posted by filbert
      i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

      98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
      Ozblackbird.net Administrator

      Comment


      • #4
        Depends on a lot of things RTFM.
        -

        Comment


        • #5
          Or just use this to take all the guess work out of the adjustment and do it right every time.

          Comment


          • #6
            http://www.letmegooglethat.com/?q=ho...otorbike+chain

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Hati View Post
              Or just use this to take all the guess work out of the adjustment and do it right every time.
              Rubbish! It might work to a degree if everyone does their chain on a side stand but if it was used on a bike with a centrestand or rear stand it could still be way too tight once the tyre is back on the ground
              #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
              Originally posted by Phildo
              Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
              Originally posted by filbert
              i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

              98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
              Ozblackbird.net Administrator

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Para045 View Post
                Rubbish! It might work to a degree if everyone does their chain on a side stand but if it was used on a bike with a centrestand or rear stand it could still be way too tight once the tyre is back on the ground
                I'm sure one manufacturer specifies that the chain should be adjusted with the rider sitting on the bike.
                The only thing wrong with a perfect ride to work is that you end up at work.
                G T

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Green Trident View Post
                  I'm sure one manufacturer specifies that the chain should be adjusted with the rider sitting on the bike.
                  Ideally you compress the rear till the centres of the drive sprocket, the swing arm pivot point, and rear sprocket are all in a line...

                  Rotate chain to find the tightest spot...

                  Set tension to have a little bit of slack...

                  Which the manufacturer did then put it back on the side stand and checked the measurement of slack up and down...

                  Then they made a sticker and put that measurement on it and stuck it to the chain guard...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Para045 View Post
                    Rubbish! It might work to a degree if everyone does their chain on a side stand but if it was used on a bike with a centrestand or rear stand it could still be way too tight once the tyre is back on the ground
                    My, still original, set of sprockets says otherwise after 50000 km ridden, mostly two up. Rubbish my ass... Maybe you should read the instructions available on the website before you make comments like that

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      tighten until chain is playable like a guitar string, a solid D is what your after

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hillz View Post
                        a solid D is what your after
                        That’s what all the girls say.
                        Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Green Trident View Post
                          I'm sure one manufacturer specifies that the chain should be adjusted with the rider sitting on the bike.

                          +1


                          Originally posted by Hati View Post
                          My, still original, set of sprockets says otherwise after 50000 km ridden, mostly two up. Rubbish my ass... Maybe you should read the instructions available on the website before you make comments like that
                          What on your scooter? So going by that with my BB's chain and sprockets at nearly double that (~96k) I must be doing something wrong eh? Particularly given 3 times the HP, my weight, the hard launches, constant wheelies and 2 up riding I think not

                          FYI maybe IF they actually had instructions on the website it may offer some clarity BUT there are no instructions on that website apart from the stupid one size fits all video clip you have to search to their main .com site to find them and they still don't offer anything apart from a comment at the bottom saying "You may need to apply rider’s weight during adjustment. Consult your manufacturer’s manual"!
                          Which is really the point, if you go by your specific owners manual rather than some random instructions on the web


                          Originally posted by Hillz View Post
                          a solid D is what your after
                          I sort of figured you as a Double D kinda guy
                          #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
                          Originally posted by Phildo
                          Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
                          Originally posted by filbert
                          i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

                          98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
                          Ozblackbird.net Administrator

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am beginning to see why young Ryan has it in for you, but I'll play along and work on your ignorance...

                            Originally posted by Para045 View Post
                            So going by that with my BB's chain and sprockets at nearly double that (~96k) I must be doing something wrong eh?
                            Never said that, simply stated that I have been using the Chain Monkey for close to 50 k that seems to prove that the tool works, otherwise chains and pinions would not last.

                            Speaking of use. This tool takes the variable (the eye of the "mechanic") out of the equation. You still do the chain adjustment by whatever method your bike's instructions call for, side stand, centre stand, sitting on it, whatever. It doesn't matter. What matters is that you apply the correct amount on slack for the size of the chain and measurement given by the manufacturer. You set the tool based on a table that comes with the tool, fit it onto the chain and tighten tool to setpoint. Then tighten chain fully. Remove tool and behold the perfect slack. 100% repeatable time and again and makes setting the rear wheel straight a piece of cake. But hey, each to their own.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hati View Post
                              I am beginning to see why young Ryan has it in for you, but I'll play along and work on your ignorance...

                              Ryan is just a poor deluded millennial who refuses to believe that others just have more experience in most matters than he does

                              Never said that, simply stated that I have been using the Chain Monkey for close to 50 k that seems to prove that the tool works, otherwise chains and pinions would not last.

                              It "may" work to a degree or it may also be luck/coincidence and a very good chain I've had good quality chains on bikes last over 50k with minimal lubing or maintenance

                              Speaking of use. This tool takes the variable (the eye of the "mechanic") out of the equation. You still do the chain adjustment by whatever method your bike's instructions call for, side stand, centre stand, sitting on it, whatever. It doesn't matter. What matters is that you apply the correct amount on slack for the size of the chain and measurement given by the manufacturer. You set the tool based on a table that comes with the tool, fit it onto the chain and tighten tool to setpoint. Then tighten chain fully. Remove tool and behold the perfect slack. 100% repeatable time and again and makes setting the rear wheel straight a piece of cake. But hey, each to their own.
                              The point I'm trying to make is that the notion of "do it right every time" if just by going off the posted video doesn't take into account all the variables involved in adjusting a chain for a particular model of bike and doesn't remove the need to go by the manufacturers recommended procedures

                              Just going off that video it may be that the chain is actually too tight IF the adjustment/measurement is required while vertical and a rider onboard as some require
                              Adjusting the chain for most bikes with dual swingarms is not really rocket science but I guess maybe there are a lot of incompetent people out there that need a magic wand to do simple jobs
                              Last edited by Para045; 19-02-2019, 03:50 PM. Reason: Decided to be nice
                              #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
                              Originally posted by Phildo
                              Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
                              Originally posted by filbert
                              i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

                              98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
                              Ozblackbird.net Administrator

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X