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  • How to change your Oil and Oil Filter

    This is a basic "How To" guide to be able to change the oil and oil filter on your motorcycle. This is generally done as part of a service requirement of your bike, at intervals defined within the motorcycles Owners Manual. Generally if you ride your bike a bit harder, or race your motorcycle, it is a good idea to change your oil more regularly, to help reduce wear and tear on your engine.
    The torque specs for tightening bolts mentioned within this "How To" guide are for a 2007 Yamaha YZF-R6. I would recommend you refer to your owners manual to find the specifications recommended for your motorcycle.



    Further how to guides will be able to be found at www.wtf-racing.com in the future......


    Recommended Tools / Equipment:

    Basic Spanner Set
    Basic Socket Set
    Basic Screwdriver Set
    Torque Wrench
    Oil Filter Wrench (optional)
    Oil PanFunnel
    Rags
    Rearstand (optional)
    Newspaper
    Aluminium Foil
    New Oil
    New Oil Filter


    Step One: Set-up Your Bike.

    Position your bike on flat, level ground that will allow you to move around and access your bike comfortably, as well as confined spaces make it both difficult to work on your bike, and increase the chance of breaking something due to limited access. If you have a Rear Stand I would suggest you put the bike up on the rearstand for the first part of the job as it will allow you to undo bolts, fasteners etc without fear of pushing the bike over.

    Step Two: Remove the Fairings

    Remove the fairings from the appropriate side of your bike to be able to get access to both the oil drain bolt, and the oil filter. Follow the instructions outlined within your owners manual.

    I suggest you have a small container that you are able to put all the loose fastners and bolts into to ensure they don't get lost. Once all the bolts & fasteners are removed, carefully remove the fairings and place them on a soft surface to ensure that they are not scratched accidentally.



    Step Three: Ensure Access to Drain Bolt and Oil Filter.

    Ensure you have complete access to your Oil drain Bolt, and the Oil Filter. As you can see I had to remove the shifter rod of the rearsets some drainage hoses to be able to get complete access to the Oil Filter.


    Step Four: Protect Headers.

    You may find that the position of the Oil Drain Plug, or the Oil filter may allow oil to run down and over the headers/engine of your bike. I suggest that where possible youe prevent this happening by using some aluminium foil to protect these items. There is almost nothing worsde than completing an oil change, and then smelling burning oil for the next 20km's as it is burnt off the headers or engine.

    At this point you have everything set-up, and you should be able to begin to change the oil. Before draining the oil, it is recommended that you run the engine for a few minutes to allow it to get warm. Oil gets thinner as it is heated up, so warming up the oil allows you to remove more of the old oil from the system before it is replaced with new oil.

    Step Five: Drain the oil.

    Run the engine for a few minutes until it gets to operating temperature, and then turn of the motorcycle. You then need to open the oil filler cap. This should be easily accesible on the right hand side of the motorcycle. This is opened to allow air into the oil system of the motorcycle, and reduce the amount of mess that may occur while draining the oil.

    Once the oil filler cap is removed, place newspaper underneth the bike to protect the ground from contamination, and position the Oil Pan underneth the Oil Drain Plug. Once these are in position, you can carefully remove the Oil Drain Plug. Watch the flow of the oil to ensure it won't miss the Oil Pan.


    Step 6: Remove the Oil Filter.

    While the oil is draining from the sump, you can remove the oil filter. If you have the Filter wrench, this is a little easier, however there is a simple alternative. Using a screwdriver and hammer, carefully pierce the Oil filter in the end, and then angle it through and pierce it out the side of the filter. This will give you enough leverage to be able to unscrew the old Oil Filter. Once it is off, ensure that the filter mating surface on the engine has no muck on it.

    Once this has been let drain a bit, the new oil filter can be installed.

    Step Seven: Install the new Oil Filter.

    Before installing the new filter, compare it to the old one. As can be seen, the new filter I have chosen is slightly different, because it has a tightening nut on the end of it. It is also cross drilled to allow easy wiring for racing.

    The new filter needs to have a thin coat of oil applied to the o-ring before installation. Initially install the new filter by hand to ensure it is not cross-threaded, and that the o-ring is seated correctly. Once this is done, the filter can be tightened to the torque specified within your owners manual (For the '07 R6, this is 12 ft-lbf).

    Step Eight: Installing the Oil Drain Plug.

    This is simply a reversal of the removal process. Before putting the plug back into the sump, check the washer for damage, and replace it if necessary. Once this is checked, put the Oil Drain Plug back into the sump, being careful not to cross-thread it. Once it is finger tight, use the torque wrench to tighten it to the manuals specifications (for the '07 R6, this is 31 ft-lbf).


    Step Nine: Filling With New Oil.

    All that is left to do is to fill the engine/gearbox with new oil, and check the level. Using a Funnel, fill the bike with the recommended amount of oil. For an '07 R6, this is 2.4L for just an oil change, and 2.6L for an oil and filter change.
    Once you have put in the recommended amount of oil (being careful not to spill any), it is time to re-install the oil filler cap, and then run the engine until the new oil is warm. As the engine is running, check for any oil leaks. Once it is warm, turn off the engine and remove the bike from the rearstand, and check the oil level. This may be done by either checking through the clear window on the RHS of the bike, below the Oil Filler Cap, or using the dipstick provided (refer to your owners manual to find out which is applicable for your bike). If the oil is low, top it up, and re-check the level.

    Step Ten: Re-install Fairings, Gear Selector Rod & Hoses.

    All that is left to do is return the overflow hoses back to their original position around the filter, re-install the gear-selector rod, and re-install the fairings. Remember, if you have a bolt left, there is something missing. Do this very carefully, and there should be no bolts/fasteners left.

    There you have it, you should have successfully completed an oil and filter change on your bike.

    Cheers

    Simmo
    Sponsored by:

    Billetta Imports, Motorcycle Panel & Paint, Pirelli, YAMALUBE

  • #2
    Thanks for posting that.

    Saf had spoken about running a new oil through, running then flushing again. Would the filter also need to be replaced twice if you did this or is that overkill?
    This is general advice only and does not take into account your individual objectives, financial situation or needs (your personal circumstances). Before using this advice to decide whether to purchase a product you should consider how appropriate it is in regard to your personal circumstances.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think you do that before you remove and replace the filter. I have to admit I use a full 4 litres to change the oil, mainly because I run about 1 L of new oil through the system before I pull off the filter, replace it, and then put in the drain plug.

      Every manual I have read doesn't seem to say anything about the need to flush the system. This is something that Saf does. I don't necessarily see the need, as long as you change your oil regularly. If you buy a bike with an unknown service history, it may be a good idea to do this, however I can't justify the time or cost, when I'm changing oil every 3,000 km's, the Filter every 6,000km's, and the old oil looks a similar colour to the new oil already.....

      Race bikes are a different, in that they are changed even more regularly (After every meet hopefully.)

      I don't think a single motorcycle mechanic will flush the system before re-filling it, unless it was for a race-bike that they were responsible for. It can end up being a huge additional expense both in time and consumables. If your Yamaha/Honda/ Kawasaki/Suzuki mechanic doesn't do it, and they see only minimal failings across the life of a model, why pay the additional expense yourself, when if your are changing your oil/filter, you are already doing it more regularly than the recommended service periods.....
      Sponsored by:

      Billetta Imports, Motorcycle Panel & Paint, Pirelli, YAMALUBE

      Comment


      • #4
        Another tip which will help slightly with making oil pressure earlier is to partially/completely (depending how messy you're prepared to be) fill the oil filter with oil before installation.

        Partially (like 1/2 full) is probably enough - this will wet the filter and prime it a little so there needs to be less oil pumped into it before you make pressure...

        Probably won't make a HEAP of difference, but yeah....


        Also, if you crank it for a little bit with the kill switch OFF, it will help the bike get some oil pressure before starting it.



        edit:
        AS to flushing, priming, running oil pressure up before starting, etc... the manual doesn't make mention of any of that. It's all small things you can do to perhaps prolong your engine life further than the baseline oil change will...

        Remember, the procedures in the manual are about ensuring you don't make a claim during the warranty period. The bike will probably last longer than that, but really - it's not in Yamaha/honda/Suzuki's interests to have your bike last forever now, is it?
        Last edited by thro; 18-10-2007, 02:03 PM.
        “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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        • #5
          What's the point of priming a filter if you half do it? Just fill it up, let it settle, and do it again... until it's full. There, primed.

          How do you crank an engine with the kill switch off? Doesn't that stop it from cranking?

          Pull the EFI fuse. 'crank/start' the engine until the oil pressure light turns off. Plug your fuse back in and Robert's your mother's brother.

          If you got any oil on the floor or tyres... you can do a few hot laps around the street and try and get your knee down. That oil will come right off!

          Comment


          • #6
            My 600rr cranks with the kill-switch flicked, it just won't start.
            “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

            Comment


            • #7
              Must just be me then.

              As you were.

              Oh btw. If you also have a front stand and set your height up properly, you don't need to drop your bike down to check your levels

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah, your bike may vary, etc.

                I've been kill-switched enough times to know it cranks
                “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                Comment


                • #9
                  The other thing that gets lots of people is when you remove the old oil filter, and the o-ring stays stuck to the engine casing. Then when you put on the new filter you suddenly have 2 o-rings on there, and are left wondering where that puddle of oil is coming from.
                  For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
                  For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If it's a new bike don't go for fully synthetic oil for say the first 3,000k. Mineral based oils are generally better at bedding an engine in than synth.

                    My racebike gets new lube after a race day & a track day. The oil that comes out looks as good as it did when it went in. When I took a look inside the cases while changing the clutch the internals looked pristine clean, no gunk buildup at all. This has to help longevity.

                    Dont skimp on da oil peeps, especially if the bike is gonna be a long termer.
                    .. and thats Racer # 193 to y'all; my fabulous sponsors (who all do good shit) are: Graeme Fleming IT Consultants, Vision Image, Pacific Safety Wear, Excess Power Equipment, Pro Photo Booth

                    .. and according to Sean'o: 'get the Kwaka (never thought i would say that!)'

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a question: old oil, what to do with it? also stuff like old brake fluid, dirty kero, coolant to I suppose... not the kind of thing you want to pour on the garden or down the drain.
                      Would most service centres be happy enough to recycle your gunk? I notice on some itemised service invoices there is an entry for "environmental recovery cost" - about $5, is that what this is?
                      "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        great write up simmo

                        just a thought. some people may read that you check the oil level while the bike is running

                        mockery- some councils collect oil as part of recycling rubbish collection. just leave it next to your recycling bin/bag. i have left brake fluid out and they have taken it aswell. not sure about coolant. i dare say there is a webpage that i cant be arsed finding that says what councils do what.
                        Respect is earned, not enforced.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by thro View Post
                          My 600rr cranks with the kill-switch flicked, it just won't start.

                          I thought all bikes did this. This is what I used to do when I hadn't started my bike for a while to make sure there was pressure before firing it up. Now i've got a kick start so don't bother.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ^^ more to the point, your bike now is 2 stroke, so the oil is burnt with the fuel anyway...
                            “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by speed3 View Post
                              I thought all bikes did this. This is what I used to do when I hadn't started my bike for a while to make sure there was pressure before firing it up. Now i've got a kick start so don't bother.
                              May just be Ducati that doesn't?

                              Or it's just the dodgy wiring that everyone keeps banging on about -

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