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what to do and have if you want to work on your bike.

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  • what to do and have if you want to work on your bike.

    Thought of throwing it up as I have been about trying to help a few people in need of getting their bike going again.
    I seem to run into the same obsticals over and over again;...

    First of all you are going to need a manual for your bike.
    Secondly you need tools and I mean tools that are in good working order and are usefull.
    Not a bag or box full of rusty shitty useless crap mixed liberaly with rainwater/garden leavesgrass clippings etc.
    Without the correct tools and knowing what to do to get to the problem one is at a distict disadvantage.
    If you do not want to invest in and look after your tools then PAY a mechanic the $$ he wants to do the job for you!
    a clean tool bag/box with the propper tools in it stored in a clean envoirment will $ave serious $$ if you want do your own bassic servicing. Over the years will be a top investment if you keep looking after them.
    The other thing that will happen is that you will get to know your bike well and can ,by servicing it reguarly prevent small issues become BIG expen$ive ones.
    You also will gain confidence and pride in your ride.
    Please feel free to put up your own view esp. if you do not agree with the above points, so more people will be able to make the step of looking after their own bike

    We could try to create a list of gear/tools/gadgets that can help you build a propper toolbox and maybe some supplier could do a special deal with PSB, who knows what where it might lead to?

  • #2
    I like "metatools", tools which can be used to make the special purpose tools for things like suspension nut removers and so on rather than buying the manufacturer ones.

    But the things you need most, I reckon, are:
    1. Another form of transport; and
    2. Somewhere you can set up your bike and tools and leave them in half built condition.

    ESPECIALLY when you're starting out, or if you're doing something new (hunting down an intermittent issue or getting into parts of the bike you've not worked on before), the thing that will kill you is rushing the job. You need to be able to do a little bit at a time as time allows without a sense of urgency that will cause you to make mistakes.

    Also - a compact camera, notebook, and big packet of ziplock bags so you can take photos of where bolts are, how bits fit before you remove them, cable routing, etc; take notes on placement issues and bolt lengths; and put sets of bolts together in labelled bags.

    This way if it takes 2 months to get parts or time to finish a job, you will still be able to put it back together afterwards and know that it's going to run!!
    "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

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    • #3
      floodlights or worklamps also help

      if you are working away busily and notice the sun going down, you don't want to be hurrying what you're doing to beat the setting sun.

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      • #4
        A clean work area!! Also put a drop cloth or something similar down. You will drop things and having a clean open area makes them so much easier to find. The floor of the gagage is painted white and alwasy gets a quick sweep before I begin.

        ... also an assortment of screw drivers, they're not one size fits all.

        I would also reccomend a good trourque wrench and get into the habbit of tightening to the correct tension. With time this will become less important as you start to get a feel for it.

        I know a lot of people will disagree with this but put all your shifters away. Where possible use the correct sized spanner for the job you're working on.

        I always break stuff when I'm being lazy or trying to take shortcuts which results in the jobs taking sooo much longer.


        Originally posted by Captain Starfish View Post
        Also - a compact camera, notebook, and big packet of ziplock bags so you can take photos of where bolts are, how bits fit before you remove them, cable routing, etc; take notes on placement issues and bolt lengths; and put sets of bolts together in labelled bags.
        This is good advice too!
        Last edited by apples; 18-09-2009, 12:52 PM.

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        • #5
          Manual.
          Dry clean place well lit to work on.
          propper bike stand/worktable so bike is secure.
          set of spanners, socket set, srewdrivers and pliers of different variety.
          cleaning rags and degreaser.
          oilcatch tray, funnel and oilfilter spanner.
          Measuring bowl.
          (Cheap) multimeter.

          help me please to mke list better.
          and for once do not take the piss or tread bomb it.
          Mods feel free to DELETE!

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          • #6
            a set of drifts and punches, quality screwdrivers and a gympie hammer.

            240, 600 and 1200 grades of wet and dry, gasket stock and gasket goo.

            miscellaneous collection of metric nuts, bolts, screws, hex heads and washers.
            Originally posted by Bendito
            If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

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            • #7
              if working on older bikes in particular an impact driver is worth its weight in beer

              patience

              phone a friend #'s if ya come unstuck
              .. and thats Racer # 193 to y'all; my fabulous sponsors (who all do good shit) are: Graeme Fleming IT Consultants, Vision Image, Pacific Safety Wear, Excess Power Equipment, Pro Photo Booth

              .. and according to Sean'o: 'get the Kwaka (never thought i would say that!)'

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              • #8
                Decent set of tools (you really do get what you pay for) i.e. no Bunnings shit or the like

                Rear stand

                Collection of bolts, nuts, loctite, inox or WD40

                Manual

                Hex socket set (or allen key set if you dont mind taking forever getting fairing bolts out)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by smeghead View Post
                  if working on older bikes in particular an impact driver is worth its weight in beer

                  patience

                  phone a friend #'s if ya come unstuck
                  THIS!

                  Knowing a mechanic or someone who is cluey with bikes, even for simple shit like changing oil or brake pads. Having someone to guide you for the first time is very valuable.

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                  • #10
                    Hanging fuel container/tank with hook fitted with a long hose and a tap.

                    Great for running the bike with the tank out of the way.
                    Being an Australian is not an excuse for being dumb and racist.

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                    • #11
                      ThreeBond sealant
                      Loctite thread lock
                      Rags

                      Not sure what they are called, but one of my favourite "tools" are the hex-to-square adaptors so you can use a drill to turn a socket. Really convenient when removing/installing engine covers, cam caps, head etc.
                      Respect is earned, not enforced.

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                      • #12
                        Rubber or better still a Copper mallet and soft drifts.
                        Good quality allen keys
                        Flexible magnet, flexible light, flexible grab claw
                        Circlip pliers
                        It has a dual purpose. ~ Tom Smitheringale

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                        • #13
                          tools as above but the number 1 thing to have is a psb acc

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                          • #14
                            2. Somewhere you can set up your bike and tools and leave them in half built condition.
                            This. A thousand times this.

                            I've spent more time disassembling and reassembling the bike to do piddly shit that took 30-45 minutes to do than I can count, and due to having time constraints, quite frequently, two very similar jobs that should have been done at the same time have required two completely separate disassemblies.

                            Only time I was left hanging so far was when I broke my clutch plate thingy, but even that was just a factor of trying to work quicker versus diminishing daylight.

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                            • #15
                              Lets keep it in first instance by bassic maintenance and maybe a small breakdown if there is such a thing?
                              And the tools needed to fix this

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