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  • Ducati Monster 696

    Wednesday, 20th July, 2016

    Having heard about a 2012 Ducati Monster 696 being sold at auction, I went to the inspection and had a look.

    Information about this bike was posted on PSB, and I had been curious about the Ducati Monster range in recent weeks.

    I have my Aprilia SXV550 motard bike, but it is designed to go fast. Riding that thing legally is torture and requires massive amounts of self-control. I’ll be keeping the SXV, but that bike requires a very careful selection of time and place. I figured that something like a Monster would be useful for more times and more places.

    I ended up buying the Monster 696 at the auction the next day. I’ll get it on the road, ride it for a while and see what I think of it. If I like it then I’ll keep it, and if I don’t take to it then I’ll resell it. It’s a bit of an experiment - I have an off-road background and have never got the hang of a sorts bike chassis and handling. Although a dedicated road bike, the Monster has a riding posture more like that of an off-road bike.

    Photos at the inspection:







    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

  • #2
    Friday, 22nd July, 2016

    As this bike was originally stolen, the original owner still had the original Ducati keys. Whoever had the bike had tried the get the bike running with a different set of keys, which would also involve a different ignition switch.

    However, the 696 has an immobiliser system and the bike has not been started since it was stolen. Thus, I was confident that there was no engine or transmission damage.

    The previous owner spent $900 on the 12,000km service only a few days before the bike was taken. Ouch. This service included fitting new belts, spark plugs and checking the valve adjustment. The bike had covered 371km since that service.

    It appears that whoever then had the bike had tried to get it going with a different ignition switch and set of keys, but failed to get the bike running because of the immobiliser. I’ll have to figure out how this works, and get the bike running with the original Ducati keys.

    I picked the thing up from Manheim auctions. This involved a lovely “discussion” at the pickup gate as I was wearing thongs, and enclosed footwear is required on site. After extension negotiations the site manager brought the bike out to me. He hung it from a forklift with straps, which was an added bonus because then it could be dropped straight into the back of the ute, instead of me wrestling it up a ramp on my own.

    I’m always up for a good laugh, so I stopped by Fraser Motorcycles to get some pricing on genuine Ducati parts. Yup, bloody hilarious.

    In the photo, the sidestand is partly down to stop the ramp sliding out the back.











    The first job was to give it a wash. Nothing fancy, just the usual CT18 in a weed sprayer bottle and a brush. The bike had been sitting in storage for about a year, so was fairly dusty.



    I went over the bike with CT18 and a brush, before rinsing it off with the garden hose.



    I got the genuine keys from the original owner, but the bike also came with another set of keys that someone has made up. These keys are different to the original ones.



    The next job was to do an oil change.



    I bought a genuine Ducati oil filter to go on. Although I knew that it wouldn’t be necessary to remove the oil pickup screen, I was curious and did so anyway.



    There were a few very minor bits of debris on the oil pickup screen, but nothing major. I cleaned it with some brake parts cleaner before drying it.



    I used a Snap-On TECH3FR100 digital torque wrench to tighten the oil pickup screen to Ducati’s specified 42Nm. This torque wrench vibrates as it approaches the set Nm and then beeps when it reaches the setting.



    There was a sticker wrapped around the front brake lever that I had tried to remove with eucalyptus oil aerosol spray. This didn’t work, so I figured I’d have a go with a heat gun and see if that would melt the sticky residue enough to remove the sticker. This actually worked very well, and I had the sticker off within a few minutes.



    I always keep an aerosol can of Bosisto’s Eucalytpus Spray in the house. It’s useful for things like this, and the front brake lever came out like new and without any sticker residue left on it.



    A massive thank-you to Anthony at Corse Motorcycles. The bikes was missing the red rear reflector, and I knew that I’d have to fit one to get the bike through a licencing inspection. I also figured that this reflector would be hugely overpriced as a Ducati genuine part.

    Anthony gave me a licence plate holder that still had the reflector on it. Bloody rapt with that.



    The reflector was then put on the Monster licence plate holder. It attaches with two 7mm lock nuts. Who the bloody hell keeps a 7mm socket in their toolbox? Luckily, I do.



    I removed the seat cowling. This is so that I can convince gullible women that this an exotic European bike and that they should come for a ride with me.



    The seat lock is missing, but the cable is still there. The cable was stuffed back through the hole and underneath the seat. I’ll go looking for a replacement lock later.



    Unfortunately, the original Ducati toolkit is missing. Bugger.



    Having left the oil to drain for a while, I put new oil in and cleaned around the drain bolt area with some aerosol brake parts cleaner.



    The battery is flat, and is buried underneath the fuel tank. A quick browse of the Ducati service manual indicates that it requires an engineering degree and an obsession with masochism to remove the fuel tank, so I’ll have a go at removing the fuel tank some other time.

    This meant that I couldn’t jump start the bike, but there was a connection there for a trickle charger. I checked my shed and found a trickle charger that I’ve been meaning to throw away for years - it came with another bike and I never used the charger. Finally, hoarding paid off.

    Once I plugged the charger in the bike started. I didn’t expect this because of the bike requiring the original keys with the correct immobiliser chip. I held one of the original keys next to the ignition switch and then turned the switch with one of the dodgy keys.

    Within seconds there was steam coming out of the back of the bike. Initially I thought it was water from when I washed the bike, but then I had a look around and saw petrol gushing out of one of the two plastic elbows underneath the fuel tank. Petrol pouring on to a hot exhaust pipe did not appeal to me so I turned the bike off and was ready to make a sprint for the garden hose if it caught fire. Luckily, it didn’t.



    Once some of the steam cleared I had a closer look. Maybe I’ll get lucky and it’s just an o-ring. You can’t just buy the plastic elbow on its own - it comes with the rubber hose as well. It’s not cheap.

    Looks like I’ll be learning how to remove this fuel tank in the near future after all. The air filter is underneath the tank, so at least I’ll get to check and possibly replace that.



    There wasn’t much else I could do for the night so left the trickle charger plugged in and called it a night.

    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hold the old key next to the ign while turning it on with the new key , you might get lucky

      whoops I see it is running , pop the lock of and I will rekey back to the old keys
      Last edited by keys; 24-07-2016, 07:10 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        nice looking duke, thanks for popping around with it !

        seeya for a Latte sometime


        Straightline2ten your motorcycle and motor car repairer for smash repairs

        insurance or private work, plastic welding,resprays, restoration and classics

        dianella 93703770

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by keys View Post
          Hold the old key next to the ign while turning it on with the new key , you might get lucky

          whoops I see it is running , pop the lock of and I will rekey back to the old keys
          You were first stop-off on the list, but the fuel pissing out of the fuel pump has relegated you down to second place.

          You will be meeting the bike as soon as I figure out that fuel elbow.

          Although, there's no reason why [MENTION=7104]Desmo[/MENTION] can't sort it out in his lunch break...
          One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

          My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Phildo View Post
            The previous owner spent $900 on the 12,000km service only a few days before the bike was taken. Ouch. This service included fitting new belts, spark plugs and checking the valve adjustment.
            Well, it seemed like money well spent at the time. If I had know it was going to be stolen, I think I may have delayed doing the service for a bit. :-)

            Originally posted by Phildo View Post
            I got the genuine keys from the original owner
            Was nice to meet you and put a face to the name.

            Originally posted by Phildo View Post
            Unfortunately, the original Ducati toolkit is missing. Bugger.
            Bugger indeed. I keep a $50 note in my tool kit. I'm guessing the bastards who stole it were pretty happy to find that :-(

            Originally posted by Phildo View Post
            Once I plugged the charger in the bike started. I didn’t expect this because of the bike requiring the original keys with the correct immobiliser chip. I held one of the original keys next to the ignition switch and then turned the switch with one of the dodgy keys.
            Ha! I was right! So happy for you. :-)
            Originally posted by mekon
            Why are pirates called pirates?
            Because they Arrrrrr

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds like you picked up a bargain with the fuel clips you just need to replace the quick connectors or find the right size o'ring

              FYI these are the biggest power to cc bikes that ducati made so they pick up and go quite well

              Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MikeL View Post
                Was nice to meet you and put a face to the name.
                Hope you were sitting down, he can be a bit scary looking the 1st time

                Good pickup Phildo
                #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
                Originally posted by Phildo
                Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
                Originally posted by filbert
                i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

                98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
                Ozblackbird.net Administrator

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Para045 View Post
                  Hope you were sitting down
                  Sitting down?

                  On what?

                  Phil would have talked the legs off all the chairs in no time...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Those plastic elbows are notorious and considered single use items. I remember hearing Triumph ones fit, and are reusable metal
                    For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
                    For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Barfridge View Post
                      Those plastic elbows are notorious and considered single use items. I remember hearing Triumph ones fit, and are reusable metal
                      Ive just been play with a street triple and the triumph ones are better LOL but harder to clip off, but also plastic.
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        On many new guzzis the elblow is part of the fuel pump. Really easy to snap by lifting the tank too high to get at the ironically named quick release coupling.
                        The crux of the biscuit is the apostrophe.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A quick look on the parts diagram shows;

                          Part No: 590.1.329.1A
                          Item: Fuel delivery pipe

                          Part No: 590.1.330.1A
                          Item: Fuel return pipe

                          Local pricing is only moderately offensive ($62.65 for each one), but the month-long wait to get the part from Italy is definitely offensive.

                          These are items 3 and 4 in the diagram:
                          One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                          My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Phildo View Post
                            The previous owner spent $900 on the 12,000km service only a few days before the bike was taken. Ouch. This service included fitting new belts, spark plugs and checking the valve adjustment. The bike had covered 371km since that service.
                            Originally posted by MikeL View Post
                            Well, it seemed like money well spent at the time. If I had know it was going to be stolen, I think I may have delayed doing the service for a bit. :-)
                            Future Ducati anti-theft protocol: Leave a note on the bike at all times saying it's due for a service next week, along with a $1,000 quote.
                            One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                            My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Phildo View Post
                              Local pricing is only moderately offensive ($62.65 for each one), but the month-long wait to get the part from Italy is definitely offensive.
                              Pretty shitty consider you can get parts from usa in four days.

                              Surely USA parts are cheaper??
                              "Some people are like clouds. When they disappear it's a beautiful day"

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