Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ducati Monster 696

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Halo_2 View Post
    Pretty shitty consider you can get parts from usa in four days.

    Surely USA parts are cheaper??
    The same parts from the US are $US47.21. Plus postage.

    However, I've just hand the fuel tank off, and it turned out to be one stuffed o-ring.
    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

    Comment


    • #17
      Ludiwicis or similar will size it for you.
      In sterquiliniis invenitur.

      Comment


      • #18
        Monday, 25th July, 2016

        Tonight I wanted to identify the reason for the fuel leak underneath the fuel tank. After watching one particular YouTube video I figured it wasn’t going to be anywhere near as complex as I’d earlier suspected.



        I started by removing the screws that hold the plastic covers on to the fuel tank. These screws require a 3mm allen key, which I don’t have a socket version of. Luckily, I still had a long one that I used a while go for a computer processor upgrade. It was fiddly having to rotate it constantly but at least I could remove the screws.



        I also removed the screw at the back of the fuel tank.



        Once I had removed all of the screws for the plastic covers I slid each one back. There is a tab on each cover that slides into a slot in the fuel tank.



        The bike, with the plastic covers removed.



        Then I removed the plastic tray that is behind the fuel tank. There are two bolts holding this tray in place.



        I could have removed the cable that feeds into the tray, but decided to just move the tray to one side instead so that I wouldn’t have to stuff around putting the cables back into place.



        I then removed the bolt that is underneath the seat area.



        There are two tubes that connect to the top of the fuel tank that need to be removed. I was careful with doing this to make sure that I didn’t snap off the plastic tubes on the fuel tank.



        I left that tubing hanging to one side, out of the way.



        On each side there is one bolt that goes through a mount on the frame, through to a bracket that is attached to the fuel tank. My bike was missing the bolt on each side, which was the first indication that someone has previously removed the fuel tank.

        And, if they were careless enough to not put the bolts back then they might have also been careless enough to not take care with jolting the fuel likes and breaking the plastic fuel elbows underneath.



        I could now separate the fuel tank from the rest of the bike. I was careful to not put any stress on the fuel lines underneath as that can result in the plastic elbows breaking.



        Once I had a look underneath the fuel tank I could see the source of the fuel leak - one of the elbows. I was also extremely relieved to see that there were no signs of damage or cracks in either of the two plastic elbows. This had been a concern as they are a) expensive, and b) not currently in stock in Australia. To replace them would require a month-long wait for parts to be sent from Italy.



        For this bike the plastic elbows aren’t available on their own. They come with the attached fuel hose, which makes them also more expensive. On almost other Ducatis they use the same elbow which is available as a separate part.

        However, if it had have turned out that one of the elbows was broken then I would have had a go at either detaching the hose from the broken elbow, or getting a new elbow and some new fuel injection hose.

        Part numbers:

        Item: Fuel delivery pipe
        Part Number: 590.1.329.1A

        Item: Fuel return pipe
        Part Number: 590.1.330.1A

        The part number for the plastic elbow (on its own) that is used on other Ducatis is 814.4.010.1A.



        Another angle showing how the plastic elbows connect into the base of the fuel pump.



        I disconnected each of the elbows and was extremely relieved to find the fault - just one broken o-ring. This meant that I could get the fuel leak problem resolved straight away.



        I had gone to Corse Motorcycles in the afternoon and got four new o-rings. These are suitable for use in petrol environments.



        Another photo of the damaged o-ring.



        Although only one o-ring was damaged I replaced all four of them as a precautionary measure.



        The two plastic elbows slide into these holes on the bottom of the fuel pump.



        I sprayed some silicon spray on to the o-rings on each elbow, as well as into the holes in the bottom of the fuel pump. Silicon spray is extremely slippery.

        Pretty much any sort of lubricant will do (ie grease) - it’s all about not tearing the o-rings when pushing the elbows into the fuel pump. There is a lot of friction between the o-rings and metal of the fuel pump, which could result in damaging an o-ring as each elbow is slid back into place.



        Once I had both elbows back in place I sprayed the area with a brake parts cleaner aerosol can to remove the previous fuel residue. This means that if there is a leak there again in the future then I’ll be able to spot it straight away.



        Another photo of the elbows in place. There was small writing on each elbow, possibly a part number? The writing was PA6-GF30.



        While I was there I noticed the fuse box, which is located on the right side of the bike. I’ll make a note of which fuses are there and carry spare ones on the bike in the future.



        For re-mounting the fuel tank, these metal pins slide into the rubber guides. I also sprayed some silicon spray into each one to ensure that the pins would slide in easily this time, and would also be easy to remove next time.



        The two fuel lines clip into this bracket on the bottom of the fuel tank.



        I checked the air filter, which looked like new.



        There is a plastic cover which is missing from the bike. This cover attaches to the bottom of the fuel pump. It holds a couple of cables in place, and shields them from the heat from the exhaust. As the present the cables rest directly on the exhaust pipe, which would result in them being burned through if the bike runs for more than a couple of minutes.

        I pushed these cables up out of the way and started the bike. I was pleased to see that there was no longer a fuel leak.



        There’s a bit of rust on the chain. This is no big deal, but seeing as the bike was running and on a paddock stand I put it in gear and held a drill with a wire brush against the chain to removed some of the rust.



        Not a huge difference, but at least it looks a bit better. I’ll put some chain lube on when I’ve got the bike running properly.

        One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

        My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

        Comment


        • #19
          Then it was time to flush the brake fluid. I use DOT 4 brake fluid on my cars and bikes, and flush it regularly on each vehicle.

          The syringe is a 60mL one that can be bought from most veterinary surgeries for a few dollars. I have attached to it a small length of clear tube that I got from a hardware shop.

          I use a 10mm/11mm ring spanner for loosening and tightening bleed nipples. As I’m often flushing brake fluid on cars, this ring spanner accesses the nipples easily and gives good leverage for loosening and tightening the nipples.



          The existing rear brake fluid didn’t look too bad, but I wanted to make sure that it had fresh stuff anyway.



          Getting carried away, I removed the rear brake fluid reservoir and cleaned it out with brake parts cleaner. Whenever possible, I clean reservoirs out to ensure that the new brake fluid doesn’t get contaminated by any of the previous stuff.

          I used the syringe to drain the old brake fluid.



          It actually took a fair while to get the fresh fluid through, which will be because it was routed through the ABS unit that is underneath the fuel tank.



          I did an engine oil change as soon as I got the bike home last week and was frustrated to see that I had overfilled it at the time. However, as I had now run the engine the oil went below the sight window (ie filling up the oil filter and circulating through the engine). I topped it up to a suitable level.



          I then removed the front brake master cylinder cap. The brake fluid looked fairly clean, but I was going to make sure that it had fresh stuff anyway.



          As with the rear brake, I used the syringe to drain out the old brake fluid. I then poured in fresh fluid, swished it around and then drained it to minimise contaminating the new fluid with previous stuff.



          I then started flushing brake fluid through on the left caliper (ie furtherest from the master cylinder). With brake nipples, I always use a 6-sided socket to initially loosen the nipple. This is to ensure that I don’t round off the nipple with the ring spanner if it’s too tight.



          The right caliper was pretty much already flushed after I had already done the left one.



          I tried to start the bike with the keys that were supplied by the auction place. This bike was stolen from the original owner, and whoever ended up with it has had some replacement keys made up.

          These keys started the bike - which wasn’t meant to happen. The Monster 696 has an immobiliser system, and these keys sure don’t look like they were cut the proper way.



          One of the original Ducati keys and one of the supplied keys. Although overexposed, you can see how precisely the Ducati key has been cut.

          I will end up getting the ignition switch set back to suit the genuine Ducati keys, including getting the keys coded to the immobiliser.



          It was time to knock off the the night. I left the bike partly in pieces because I’ll have to buy and fit the plastic cover that goes between the fuel pump and exhaust pipe.



          One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

          My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

          Comment


          • #20
            Is there any place SOR i could get replacement fuel o rings, noticed inside my quick my connector it looks pinched but isn't leaking for now.
            "Some people are like clouds. When they disappear it's a beautiful day"

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Halo_2 View Post
              Is there any place SOR i could get replacement fuel o rings, noticed inside my quick my connector it looks pinched but isn't leaking for now.
              Transeals in Welshpool would be my guess. Don't know of anyone further south
              I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people, I'm just saying lets remove all the warning lables and let the problem sort itself out...
              - Sarcasteacher

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Halo_2 View Post
                Is there any place SOR i could get replacement fuel o rings, noticed inside my quick my connector it looks pinched but isn't leaking for now.
                Originally posted by shaynus View Post
                Transeals in Welshpool would be my guess. Don't know of anyone further south
                This. Transeals springs to mind.

                I got lucky with those o-rings last night. I went to see Anthony at Corse Motorcycles yesterday and he supplied the correct ones. Saved me having to remove o-rings and then go match them up at Transeals, meaning that I could fix the fuel leak straight away.
                One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                Comment


                • #23
                  [MENTION=5471]Halo_2[/MENTION] Ludowici Seals are in Canning Vale.
                  In sterquiliniis invenitur.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Crobbo View Post
                    Halo_2 Ludowici Seals are in Canning Vale.
                    Ludowici Sealing Solutions

                    Address: 57 Tacoma Circuit, Canning Vale WA 6155

                    Phone: (08) 9468 4500

                    https://www.ludowiciseals.com.au
                    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Just went to Transeals, shame about $10 min now i have a shitload.
                      "Some people are like clouds. When they disappear it's a beautiful day"

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Thursday, 8th August, 2016

                        When I removed the fuel tank I found that there was a plastic cover missing that goes over the fuel pump, and also keeps a couple of cables away from the exhaust pipe.

                        There were no new ones in stock in Australia, and it took me a couple of weeks of looking around to finally find one secondhand. This meant that I could put the fuel tank back on properly.



                        The plastic cover forces the two fuel pipes to the front and upward, along with the power cable for the fuel pump.



                        The plastic fuel tank is much easier to work with than the usual steel tank. This also meant that I didn’t have to be concerned with scratching the tank whenever I was moving it around.



                        I forgot to take a photo of the plastic cover before putting it on, but here it is in place. The cable for the oxygen sensor is also routed around the outside of the plastic cover, keeping the cable off the exhaust pipe.



                        The fuel tank mounting bolt was previously missing on each side, so I bought new ones.



                        I reconnected the two breather hoses on top of the fuel tank, taking care not to stress and break the plastic tubes on the fuel tank that they slide on to.



                        There is one bolt that is fitted from underneath the rear mudguard, and feeds into the back of the fuel tank.



                        Having got the fuel tank properly mounted I could then put on the two plastic shrouds.



                        And then the central plastic cover. I was now finished messing around with the fuel tank for now.



                        I poured some graphic powder down the ignition switch to lubricate it. Being a dry lubricant, it won’t get sticky and jam up like a liquid lubricant normally would.

                        I also took the keys that came with the bike to a locksmith and had them scanned. This confirmed that they contain a T5 immobiliser chip, confirming that someone had somehow successfully recoded the Ducati system to accept those keys. So much for Ducati’s anti-theft intentions.

                        I’m still looking for a seat lock. Once I find one of those then I’ll get that and the ignition switch reset back to accept the original Ducati keys.



                        I put the seat back on the Monster and it was now back in one piece. All it needs now is a pair of mirrors and it’s ready for licencing. I’ve got a set of original Monster mirrors on the way, which should be here any day now.


                        In the background is my Aprilia SXV550 motard bike. This bike is a problem - it wants to do all sorts of things which will get me into trouble. I’ll probably keep the SXV forever - it’s too much fun to sell and there’s nothing suitable to replace it. However, riding the SXV is all about time and place - and there are very few times and places these days where I can get away with the things that bike does.



                        Apart from the mirrors, the only thing missing now is the seat lock. I’ll find one secondhand sooner or later.



                        The tip of the rear brake lever has been bent upward, so I’ll bend that back into place later.

                        One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                        My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Good write up uncle Phil, but please stop telling people you own my SXV. It adds to their confusion
                          Rest in Peace

                          #294

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I poured some graphic powder down the ignition switch to lubricate it. Being a dry lubricant, it won’t get sticky and jam up like a liquid lubricant normally would.

                            Ducati locks come new covered in a white grease , adding graphic just makes grinding paste it was never ment for auto type locks .

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Monday, 8th August, 2016

                              On the day that I picked up the Monster there was also a set of mirrors listed for auction on eBay. I got them extremely cheap at $20 for the pair.

                              After I didn’t hear back from the seller for a few days I rang him. He also had two K&N KN153 oil filters, so we did a deal to include them as well.

                              However, the parcel went missing, and i was getting frustrated because the seller hadn’t sent it via Registered Post like I’d asked. This meant that it couldn’t be tracked.

                              Finally, the box turned up on the front porch. It had been addressed to the wrong street name (ie misspelling), and someone else had handwritten on the box to try my street.

                              Excellent. The mirrors were the last thing I needed to get the bike licenced.



                              I already had new bolts and washers from Ducati for mounting them.



                              The mirrors are like Mickey Mouse ears - they extend out past the ends of the handlebars.



                              The bolt for the right-side mirror has a left-hand thread (ie the opposite to normal).

                              One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                              My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Phildo View Post
                                The mirrors are like Mickey Mouse ears - they extend out past the ends of the handlebars.

                                Yeah I can see the similarity

                                #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
                                Originally posted by Phildo
                                Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
                                Originally posted by filbert
                                i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

                                98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
                                Ozblackbird.net Administrator

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X