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  • "Waxing" tyres?

    So I preface this thread by saying it's entirely possible some shit was lost in translation, but I'm still curious.

    One of my mums workmates rides a Duc (she doesn't know which one, I know, really narrows it down right, but apparently it's "big" - der) and so they often have a bit of a yarn about bikes as my mum used to ride a little Yammie 250 back in her hey-day before I was born, and now with me riding also I suspect she may ask him a few bike-related things now and then, to make sure her daughter is keeping on the straight and narrow .

    Anyway. Apparently he just got 2 new tyres for the Duc and the place "waxed" them, and subsequently there was a run-in period where he is to ride upright, or something along those lines.

    What the hell is this about, I thought maybe it was a track thing but she confirmed it is not a track bike and is simply his regular commuter, and I can't understand what the fuck anyone would "wax" motorbike tyres for?

    Does this make sense to anyone, or has the whole lot simply been lost in translation from A (knows heaps about bikes) to B (knows not very much about bikes) to C (Lady J, who knows nothing about anything...lol)?
    AKA Lady Jonas

  • #2
    It's the mould release from when the tyres were manufactured...

    It's slippery and needs caution while it wears off...

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    • #3
      Ah, thanks Rich! So this isn't something that the tyre place specifically puts on the tyres for some reason? She said he was really unhappy about it and wouldn't be going back to the same place again, so I assumed it was something external added to the tyres that shouldn't/wouldn't normally be put on there.
      AKA Lady Jonas

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      • #4
        shops don't wax tyres probably something lost in translation there.

        tyres are very slippery when new and need to be carefully scrubbed in. some people say its cos of the release compounds the makers coat the tyre moulds with and the lay term for this is 'wax'.

        below shows just how slippery they can be and what happens if you dont 'carefully' scrub them in.




        Originally posted by Lady Jonas View Post
        She said he was really unhappy about it and wouldn't be going back to the same place again
        *sigh*
        Last edited by g0zer; 11-12-2012, 08:41 AM.
        Originally posted by Bendito
        If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

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        • #5
          +1 For Rich's comment.

          You'll find out very quickly how slippery the release mold is on the tires are if you decide to go fast around corners.
          You don't need to ride in a straight line until it wears off, just take corners carefully and more gradually.

          I was told by a few people could be up to 100-200kms to wear off.

          Can you scrub it off if you really want to?

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          • #6
            Cool, thanks a lot guys, appreciate it. In hindsight I do remember being told to take it easy around corners on my bike when I first got it as the tyres would be slippery, I guess that's why!
            AKA Lady Jonas

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=g0zer;2732539]shops don't wax tyres probably something lost in translation there.

              tyres are very slippery when new and need to be carefully scrubbed in. some people say its cos of the release compounds the makers coat the tyre moulds with and the lay term for this is 'wax'.

              below shows just how slippery they can be and what happens if you dont 'carefully' scrub them in.



              Fuck, that would be devastating. I think I'm even more scared to ride now than I was before, if that was even possible!

              I should say I don't know whether it was the "wax" issue that was the reason he said he wouldn't go back, or if there was another reason. Seh said it cost him around $500 for the 2 tyres, which I thought sounded about right, but perhaps that's more expensive than it should be?
              AKA Lady Jonas

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              • #8
                Funny how most shit themselves with new tyres... I personally love the fact that you can take off from the shop, doing all of 10kph and the back wheel is doing 160kph.
                Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

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                • #9
                  It isn't like the tyres are lubed up or anything. Plus if you think about it, if it truly were that treacherous and you HAD to keep the bike upright during run-in period or risk sliding around, wouldn't the sides be just as slippery the moment you leaned the bike over AFTER the run-in period?
                  Just lean it over gradually, smoothly.
                  $500 for tyres is pretty normal from a shop inc fitting and balancing.
                  If you love your motorcycle, set it free. If it comes back, you probably high-sided.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TurboR1 View Post
                    Funny how most shit themselves with new tyres... I personally love the fact that you can take off from the shop, doing all of 10kph and the back wheel is doing 160kph.
                    yup, did that on my old zx10 way back....was completely accidental
                    "I think she's kinda sweet...but she makes her living catching cum in her mouth and i'm sensing that's a problem with you"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mould release compounds are no longer used in motorcycle tyre manufacture.

                      The reason why the tyre surface is smooth and 'waxy' is two-fold:

                      1. The mould is polished so the new tyre surface is smooth;

                      2. All rubber products are loaded with an antioxidant product to preserve the tyre and particularly to reduce oxidisation during the high temperature manufacturing process.

                      This product is not soluble in rubber so it diffuses out and some of it (a layer a few molecules thick) ends up on the new tyre surface. This boils and scuffs away when the tyre is ridden and heated up to operating temperature.

                      Because this product is integrated into the rubber, sanding the tyre or wiping the tyre with cleaning agents doesn't really remove it. Only riding the bike will do the job properly.

                      But yes, a new tyre can be slippery - especially on a wet road!
                      "Live Long and Prosper"

                      Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Spock View Post
                        Mould release compounds are no longer used in motorcycle tyre manufacture.

                        The reason why the tyre surface is smooth and 'waxy' is two-fold:

                        1. The mould is polished so the new tyre surface is smooth;

                        2. All rubber products are loaded with an antioxidant product to preserve the tyre and particularly to reduce oxidisation during the high temperature manufacturing process.

                        This product is not soluble in rubber so it diffuses out and some of it (a layer a few molecules thick) ends up on the new tyre surface. This boils and scuffs away when the tyre is ridden and heated up to operating temperature.

                        Because this product is integrated into the rubber, sanding the tyre or wiping the tyre with cleaning agents doesn't really remove it. Only riding the bike will do the job properly.

                        But yes, a new tyre can be slippery - especially on a wet road!
                        Michelin still run mold release compound but their tyres are generally the roughest texture with the most grip straight out of the shop, they use a powder made from minerals.

                        The surface of the tyre is super smooth and the road isn't, since grip relies on surface area contact for friction, the skin on the surface needs to cut, scuffed and generally broken so that it can conform to the surface, the heat smooth the surface during the molding process and creates a lack of grip just as much as any chemical used or even rubber oils rising to the surface, just as old tyres going hard have less grip from the oxidation creating a skin of hard rubber.
                        Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                        when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by filbert View Post
                          Michelin still run mold release compound
                          I wonder if they only use mould release in the sidewall as some manufacturers do to ensure that engraving in the sidewall (with tyre size, inflation pressure, etc.) looks nice.
                          "Live Long and Prosper"

                          Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

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                          • #14
                            Yes you have to "scrub" new tyres in beacuse they can be slippery! I suspect that the guys at Tyres for Bikes have seen a lot of stacks not far from the shop.
                            Spiral out, keep going...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Spock View Post
                              I wonder if they only use mould release in the sidewall as some manufacturers do to ensure that engraving in the sidewall (with tyre size, inflation pressure, etc.) looks nice.
                              [MENTION=8900]shan[/MENTION] and I did some research on this once before when the question came up and pirelli pride themselves on not running a mould release and instead having super smooth, super clean moulds so the tyre doesn't stick, they would be one of the slipperiest IMHO before scuffing but most others are doing the same, michelin however run the mould release powder so their tyres are ready to hit the road minus the smooth surface and you can see the difference on the rack or the bike, I'll try to find more info later if you're interested, I'm supposed to be sleeping
                              Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                              when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

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