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  • #16
    What...???? you crashed..?

    I need SpecSavers..FFS
    " Imagination is the seed of life..."

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    • #17
      Bummer about the crash, seems you're alright which is lucky.

      Now that the bike has crashed it's probably a bit late to try and diagnose what mechanical issues may / may not have contributed.

      You're going to want to check everything during the repair anyway. Brake discs, forks, bearings, tyres, wheel balance, etc.

      Are you fixing it yourself or getting it done elsewhere? Insurance or not?
      Click Link for My Bikes:

      Aprilia RS250
      1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Loud View Post
        Bummer about the crash, seems you're alright which is lucky.

        Now that the bike has crashed it's probably a bit late to try and diagnose what mechanical issues may / may not have contributed.

        You're going to want to check everything during the repair anyway. Brake discs, forks, bearings, tyres, wheel balance, etc.

        Are you fixing it yourself or getting it done elsewhere? Insurance or not?
        I'm doing it myself where possible and not under insurance at this stage. Just trying to source parts from wreckers at this stage

        Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

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        • #19
          My bet.. Tyre pressure low.
          " Imagination is the seed of life..."

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          • #20
            You don't need to lift the front wheel off the ground to start/maintain a tank slapper, just the front getting light is enough to do it or going light over ripples in the road. If the front wheel was off the ground, or even mid tank slapper if you can lift the front wheel off the ground again it goes away.

            The first of the R1s were notorious for tank slappers, as they would lift the front wheel, the Yamaha engineers figured it would be a good idea to install longer forks so that the front wheel would be in touch with the ground for longer. the result was a bike that would be light and skim the bumps and shake angrily at 1/2 hearted acceleration attempts.

            I doubt very much that there was anything wrong with your bike, and I'm 99% certain that your resulting tank slapper was entirely of your own making, tough way to learn that lesson.
            Last edited by TurboR1; 27-08-2018, 04:17 PM.
            Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

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            • #21
              I'm with The shed, low front tyre pressure, and not so refined technique

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Water pig View Post
                I'm with The shed, low front tyre pressure, and not so refined technique
                Would definitely agree technique had a large effect. I will be checking it out mechanically in the near future. The only concern was how quickly the shake became uncontrollable. There didn't seem to be any prelim shakes or shudders, just an immediate lock to lock shake

                Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JoshuaB View Post
                  Would definitely agree technique had a large effect. I will be checking it out mechanically in the near future. The only concern was how quickly the shake became uncontrollable. There didn't seem to be any prelim shakes or shudders, just an immediate lock to lock shake

                  Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk
                  it's possible that your damper is old and could've done with a service or a replacement. I intend on buying another Daytona this year, and when/if I find the one I'll be replacing things like the damper with items that are easier to fix/maintain like a top-mount damper. Anything with oil in it should have the oil changed as part of a regular maintenance schedule (akin to motor oil, fork oil, etc) and I would hazard a guess to say the oil in yours is probably from 2008. As Mr Bean said, you could always replace it with a better and newer aftermarket model to give you some certainty.

                  On a slightly different subject, if you need some new parts I may have bits and pieces that you need laying around as unused spares. If you send me a message with what you need I can see if I've got anything I can sell you cheaply to get your bike back in action
                  Rest in Peace

                  #294

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                  • #24
                    While we're at it.. Good place in Perth to service a steering damper? (Hyperpro)

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JoshuaB View Post
                      Would a better quality steering damper help? I only weigh 55kg so using my weight Doesnt have a large effect
                      Pay attention to Mr Bean's post. There are many variables to this beyond bike. Yes, make sure it is set up properly, including if needed getting someone to set the suspension for your weight. A heavy rider has less problems but the suspension needs to be individually tailored.

                      Also think about weight distribution in day to day riding. The bars are for steering not 'hanging on'. Your hands should be light on the bars. A rigid death grip is no good for anything. Riding around with your heels hooked on the foot pegs might seem ok but usually means your weight is on your arse/seat which raises centre of gravity.

                      Riding with the balls of your feet on the pegs allows leverage to adjust the amount of pressure that considerably changes weight distribution when facing changing conditions.

                      More downward pressure lowers centre of gravity. Your mass is on the pegs. The bike can move under you and self correct if you are not in some type of rigid death grip experience.

                      Your upright body does not become part of the oscillating mass contributing to the bike's movement. That's where leaning forward when it happens helps.

                      Use your calf, thigh and gut (core) muscles, to 'hold' onto the bike. It helps in all riding conditions.

                      Your attitude is good. Learn from the experience get your bike sorted and back on it.
                      The crux of the biscuit is the apostrophe.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by AZAZL View Post
                        Pay attention to Mr Bean's post. There are many variables to this beyond bike. Yes, make sure it is set up properly, including if needed getting someone to set the suspension for your weight. A heavy rider has less problems but the suspension needs to be individually tailored.

                        Also think about weight distribution in day to day riding. The bars are for steering not 'hanging on'. Your hands should be light on the bars. A rigid death grip is no good for anything. Riding around with your heels hooked on the foot pegs might seem ok but usually means your weight is on your arse/seat which raises centre of gravity.

                        Riding with the balls of your feet on the pegs allows leverage to adjust the amount of pressure that considerably changes weight distribution when facing changing conditions.

                        More downward pressure lowers centre of gravity. Your mass is on the pegs. The bike can move under you and self correct if you are not in some type of rigid death grip experience.

                        Your upright body does not become part of the oscillating mass contributing to the bike's movement. That's where leaning forward when it happens helps.

                        Use your calf, thigh and gut (core) muscles, to 'hold' onto the bike. It helps in all riding conditions.

                        Your attitude is good. Learn from the experience get your bike sorted and back on it.
                        I imagine the suspension setup would've had an effect. I currently ride as light as humanly possible on the bars and hold on with my knees. Pretty sure I do all of that at the moment.

                        Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Triple View Post
                          While we're at it.. Good place in Perth to service a steering damper? (Hyperpro)
                          [MENTION=76613]Chain Reaction[/MENTION] Motorcycles
                          “How people treat you is their karma; how you respond is yours.”

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JoshuaB View Post
                            I'm doing it myself where possible and not under insurance at this stage. Just trying to source parts from wreckers at this stage
                            What parts are you chasing? I've had a few 675's over the years and have some bits and pieces laying around. I've also raced and rebuilt 675's. I have an intimate knowledge of first and second gen Daytonas. I can also steer you in the right direction for any parts you need.
                            Send me a PM if you want any help.
                            Do you have any photos of the damage?
                            “How people treat you is their karma; how you respond is yours.”

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                            • #29
                              Once back on the road take it to MartyMoose to get the suspension baselined for your weight & an education on what to change & why.

                              Getting the bike setup to suit you makes a world of difference.
                              .. and thats Racer # 193 to y'all; my fabulous sponsors (who all do good shit) are: Graeme Fleming IT Consultants, Vision Image, Pacific Safety Wear, Excess Power Equipment, Pro Photo Booth

                              .. and according to Sean'o: 'get the Kwaka (never thought i would say that!)'

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by smeghead View Post
                                Once back on the road take it to MartyMoose to get the suspension baselined for your weight & an education on what to change & why.

                                Getting the bike setup to suit you makes a world of difference.
                                Have spoken to Marty and he has said I'd need to go elsewhere for my setup


                                Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

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