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Brake Fluid Refill and checking Transmission Fluid

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  • Brake Fluid Refill and checking Transmission Fluid

    Hi,

    I was just wondering if i could just refill the brake fluid myself or do i have to take it to a shop n get them to pressurize it so i dun get any air in my brakes??

    Also there is no dip stick to check Transmission fluid levels.. so how do i know if i'm low n need to top up??

    Plus wat's the best brands for brake n transmission fluids?

    Thanks
    RiDe HaRd n RiDe FaSt Or DoN't RiDe At AlL!!!

    I dunno wat i'm doing >_<

  • #2
    on a bike the transmission fluid is the engine oil. so all ya have to do is keep the oil toped up and it all good.

    Re brake fluid,

    jsut keep it between the max and mix leves and your resviour. As the pads wear, the pistions have to move further to contact the pad to the disc, so you fluid will drop. If your just toping the system up, you dont need to do anything other than opening up the resiviour and pouring the stuff in.

    too easy

    pease out

    TRX

    (\__/)
    (='.'=)
    (")_(")

    Comment


    • #3
      bleeding brakes (borrowed from somewhere i cant remember)

      ...you can do it without unbolting the caliper as well, just skip steps 6-11 people sometimes clean the pistons usually on older bikes where pitting or rust my have started


      1. Loosen the bleed nipple on the calliper.
      2. Bleed some fluid out of the master cylinder, but not all of it - about half.
      3. Nip the nipple back up.
      4. Loosen the banjo bolt on the master cylinder (the bolt that bolts the brake cable to the master cylinder)
      5. Nip it back up.
      6. Unbolt the calliper from the forks.
      7. Remove the brake pads.
      8. Pump the pistons out a little (not to much, just one pump)
      9. Clean the rim of the piston with a bit of wet and dry sand paper.
      10. Using a G-clamp, push the pistons back into the calliper (best use and old pad between the piston and the clamp and a piece of cardboard between the calliper and the and the clamp) only use the clamp to puch the pistons back, don't tighten it up. Leave the clamp there while bleeding.
      11. Pump the brake lever and hold it down
      12. Loosen the banjo bolt at the master cylinder until fluid and bubbles escape (best to use a rag to catch it)
      13. Nip master cylinder banjo back up.
      14. Repeat steps 11 - 13 until no bubbles are seen.
      15. Tighten the banjo bolt right up.
      16. Using a piece of transparent pipe and a tin (pipe has to be able to slip over the bleed nipple firmly and a tin with a hole for the pipe will catch the fluid) place the pipe over the nipple.
      17. Hold down the brake lever.
      18. Loosen the bleed nipple and the fluid will flow through the pipe
      19. Check for bubbles.
      20. Tighten the nipple.
      21. Release the brake lever.
      22. Repeat steps 17 - 21 until no bubbles are seen.
      23. Remove the clamp.
      24. Replace the brake pads.
      25. Bolt the calliper back onto the forks.
      26. Watching the brake fluid level, pump the brakes until they are firm again (normal)
      27. Replace cover on master cylinder.
      28. DONE

      as for your gearbox oil, youve got a 2 stroke so the gearbox oil is only for the gearbox not the whole lub system like on 4 strokes. shoot down to a bike shop ans ask them for some 2 stroke gearbox oil, theyll sort you out

      Comment


      • #4
        or if you have to ask whether to "just top it up or whatever" , then I'd get it done at a shop coz your brakes need to be done correctly....

        And the shop will also sort you out with gearoil.
        There may be an inspection glass on the side of the gearbox which will indicate your gear oil level. Check the owners maunal if ya got one.

        Comment


        • #5
          sweet.. thanx guys
          RiDe HaRd n RiDe FaSt Or DoN't RiDe At AlL!!!

          I dunno wat i'm doing >_<

          Comment


          • #6
            hi guys,

            i wanted to ask if it's tru if brake fluid is exposed to the air it's no good?

            cheers
            RiDe HaRd n RiDe FaSt Or DoN't RiDe At AlL!!!

            I dunno wat i'm doing >_<

            Comment


            • #7
              hi guys,

              i wanted to ask if it's tru if brake fluid is exposed to the air it's no good?

              cheers
              Ummm its exposed to the air when you put it in... so I cant see that being a problem.

              UV (Sunlight) exposure is a different thing. UV light will begin to break down the brakefluid, but the process is very slow you wont notice it much unless you never change your fluid.
              If you can... you MUST!

              Comment


              • #8
                hi guys,

                i wanted to ask if it's tru if brake fluid is exposed to the air it's no good?

                cheers
                Ummm its exposed to the air when you put it in... so I cant see that being a problem.

                UV (Sunlight) exposure is a different thing. UV light will begin to break down the brakefluid, but the process is very slow you wont notice it much unless you never change your fluid.
                Perhaps what your confused about is air in with the fluid,

                Ambient air around the fluid ie, in the tin or fluid resivior is ok but getting air in the brake lines is not.

                So exposing it to air ( breaking seal and pouring ) is ok.
                But mixing it with air by shaking the bottle or allowing air gaps to get into the brake lines when bleeding will cause lots of problems, from no brakes, spongy or soft brakes to brake fade.

                As I said before if you are unsure about this get it done by a pro or atleast a compitent friend that does'nt know about any inheritance you might be up for

                BRAKES SAVE YOUR ASS DONT FUCK WITH THEM

                Comment


                • #9
                  lol i guess i didn't give a very clear question.

                  coz my friend said if brake fluid is exposed to the air for a substantial amount of time ie. brake fluid container is not completely sealed up and air can get into the container, then the fluid is useless.

                  but you've answered my question

                  hhrrmm find a competent friend eh.... will u be my friend??

                  cheers
                  RiDe HaRd n RiDe FaSt Or DoN't RiDe At AlL!!!

                  I dunno wat i'm doing >_<

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air - thus reducing the boiling point. The longer it is exposed, then the more moisture it gets... Also, the moisture can corrode the intenals of your brake system, so you shouldn't use fluid from an open bottle that you don't know the age of. If in doubt, get some new stuff and throw the old fluid away.

                    Aim high and consider yourself worthy of great things

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hhrrmm find a competent friend eh.... will u be my friend??
                      Gordo is anything BUT competent!
                      If you can... you MUST!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        oh Klinky I see your mums been feeding you brave pills again

                        I'm thinking you require your left one inflated ya cheeky carnt

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          alritey,

                          so how old is too old??
                          RiDe HaRd n RiDe FaSt Or DoN't RiDe At AlL!!!

                          I dunno wat i'm doing >_<

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If your not sure how old it is, or if it is any good, then buy some new fluid. It's not that expensive...

                            Aim high and consider yourself worthy of great things

                            Comment

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