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  • Chain Installation, shortening

    Well I've got a new chain for the VFR and was trying to install it tonight;
    it needs 16 links removed to get from 120 to 104. This has proved so far to be unfruitful.
    I thought all I needed to do was grind off the head of the rivet then punch it out with a drift. Didn't work, so I did all 4 rivet heads, punched both from each side, but still nothing budges.
    So, am I missing something? Do I just need to grind more? cut the link itself? If so, how then do I remove the last bit?

    I did manage to get the old chain off previously, but had no qualms about completely butchering it, so that's what I did. I would rather shorten the new chain in a more elegant way, without damaging it...
    "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

  • #2
    You need to grind em in a fair bit, then punch em out.
    Should be fairly straight forward.
    Give it a fair whack with a hammer and a centre punch.

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    • #3
      Or do it properly and get a chain tool Motion Pro Tools - Chain
      #1 Gold Ticket Holder for the Barfridge Fan Club
      Originally posted by Phildo
      Noted. We'll check back on that one in three years
      Originally posted by filbert
      i'll pretend you didn't know she was 13

      98 BADASS TITANIUM BLACKBIRD - Past bikes 1982 XS250 Yamaha & 1983 CB750F with 900 motor
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      • #4
        Grind slightly into the face of the link plate then tap a screwdriver between the link faceplates to remove then tap the pins across. Sounds like your not gringing into the plate far enough.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Para045 View Post
          Or do it properly and get a chain tool Motion Pro Tools - Chain

          You saying you can't do it 'properly' without a chain tool?

          Just do what Desmo and Blackzook said Mockery. Mo' grind

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          • #6
            You need to grind the plate flat till you cant see the pins in the plate.

            Then insert vertically a large flat blade scredriver between the sideplate link and the rollers on the inner and give it a tap. The sideplate falls off effortlessly.

            I dont use a chain tool, over-rated.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Desmogod View Post
              You need to grind em in a fair bit, then punch em out.
              Should be fairly straight forward.
              Give it a fair whack with a hammer and a centre punch.

              have you been watching the Honda mechanics again. why use a grinder when a tool has been made for the job. forget the grinder, just use a gas axe..
              Atlas Performance, dyna pumps, " your name goes here"

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              • #8
                Dont grind the wrong link

                :whistles innocently:

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                • #9
                  Okay, thanks guys. Looks like it's back to the grind then...

                  and yes, i made damn sure it was the right link about 6 times before and during cutting!
                  "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

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                  • #10
                    If you're doing your front sprocket... loosen that before you break the chain too

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                    • #11
                      it's okay, the old chain and sprockets have been off for weeks.
                      I found the engine resistance in 1st gear was sufficient to tighten the front sprocket though

                      juuust waiting on HEL to return my rear brake line after shortening it a bit, then I can finish bolting up the rear hub and maybe ride the bike for the first time in months!
                      "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

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                      • #12
                        I found the engine resistance in 1st gear was sufficient to tighten the front sprocket though

                        That doesnt sound tight enough. Engine compression would not offer enough resistance to properly tighten the front sprocket bolt. Use a torque wrench and tighten it to sec with the chain on and the rear brake held on by a mate.

                        Or just crank it till your AC joint snaps.


                        I have the correct chain tools and they are useless. The grinder is the only way. I do like the idea of the oxy but it might bruise the O rings a bit LOL

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                        • #13
                          Torqued up to 55 Nm, with torque wrench, I didn't think it would be enough either, but gave it a shot and, click-click it was fine.
                          Tightening is going against the normal drive direction, maybe that helped, 'cos I def. had to use the rear brake when I undid it.
                          "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mockery View Post
                            Well I've got a new chain for the VFR and was trying to install it tonight;
                            it needs 16 links removed to get from 120 to 104. This has proved so far to be unfruitful.
                            I thought all I needed to do was grind off the head of the rivet then punch it out with a drift. Didn't work, so I did all 4 rivet heads, punched both from each side, but still nothing budges.
                            So, am I missing something? Do I just need to grind more? cut the link itself? If so, how then do I remove the last bit?

                            I did manage to get the old chain off previously, but had no qualms about completely butchering it, so that's what I did. I would rather shorten the new chain in a more elegant way, without damaging it...
                            I did this last night. Had a hell of job with it. I even blunted my tungstan tipped centre punch.

                            The problem was I did not have the chain straight/level. The tollerence on some of these chains is almost an interference fit. After about 10 mins hammering I gave up. I picked it up to put it away till the weekend and the troublesome link fell out itself.

                            Keel

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