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Aprilia RSV4 x limited edition

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  • #31
    They only depreciate if you sell them.
    “How people treat you is their karma; how you respond is yours.”

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Mr Bean View Post
      They only depreciate if you sell them.
      And if you keep them long enough, and buy something reasonably niche, they appreciate again


      V4s, 2 strokes, triples.... anything other than the brain-out sport bike formula of "japanese 4 stroke inline 4" (which from a performance standpoint is of course cheap bang for buck) imho will eventually appreciate.
      “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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      • #33
        Seems funny talking about value of bikes because we don't buy them to make money (I don't regret one cent I've spent on bikes). If making $ was our intent, there's definitely better investments to be made.

        Agree with them only technically depreciating if you sell them. If you know it's a keeper, sure; but often those that appreciate in value likely go through many owners before people retrospectively realise their value/worth compared to what has subsequently been released, and then become a keeper. Similarly, while something may appreciate, again only relevant if you sell. I guess with manufacturing restrictions getting tighter and with all the rider safety bs, older bikes look increasingly attractive. I guess also you don't know that the tech development at that time, while possibly groundbreaking is not to be developed further/made again etc.
        There's also nostalgic childhood dream bikes people buy which may have no monetary value - my childhood dream bike was a green kwaka ninja... I clearly had no taste
        To date, I don't regret selling any of my bikes. A few were harder to sell than others because of my personal attachment to them, the others were easy. None of them unique though, or likely to be sought after in future.
        Last edited by Kristy; 07-04-2019, 11:05 AM.

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        • #34
          Buying to make money is of course dubious.

          But if you can get something that is fun to own and ride and not lose money or maybe even come out in front - essentially free money vs. buying a new jap inline 4 like everyone else and taking the massive depreciation hit.

          Had this discussion with a mate regarding cars.

          If you want to find out what's going to be worth a mint in future, probably talk to kids age 6-12 and see what they dream about owning today. Then buy it in 5-10 year's time while its still cheap

          I remember when the VL walkinshaw came out for example. A lot of adults at the time called it the plastic fantastic and crapped on it.

          Now? worth heaps. One recently sold for $340k
          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Kristy View Post
            There's also nostalgic childhood dream bikes people buy which may have no monetary value - my childhood dream bike was a green kwaka ninja...
            Case in point, me buying a ZX7R last year as I always wanted one when I first started riding but couldn't afford it. Knowing that back in the day they were a great handling, powerful race bike.

            However after a decade of riding and racing R1's, ZX10R's and any number of other 1000cc super bikes, jumping on a 20year old design bike, while still fun, was hardly the experience that my rose coloured youth painted it out to be.
            Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

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            • #36
              Originally posted by TurboR1 View Post
              However after a decade of riding and racing R1's, ZX10R's and any number of other 1000cc super bikes, jumping on a 20year old design bike, while still fun, was hardly the experience that my rose coloured youth painted it out to be.
              Because...

              Originally posted by thro
              anything other than the brain-out sport bike formula of "japanese 4 stroke inline 4"
              we have inline 4 sports bikes that are far more capable today.

              buying an old one is just... buying something less advanced. for the most part. old versions of exactly the same formula are imho always going to be a disappointment.

              probably doesn't help that it would have about 2/3 the horses at the wheel of your ZX10... at best
              “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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