Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dirt bike riding tips

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dirt bike riding tips

    Today I rode along some sections of dirt road that was more like a slushy than gravel. My bike kept feeling like both the front and rear were going to wash out - but in opposite directions. Letting the bike just do its thing had me heading towards a water pipe - steering was really tricky.

    I had no idea where to position my weight either. As trying all variations (centre, standing, over front, rear) didn't result in better handling. Nor did speeding up or slowing down. Constant pace going down or up hill being tricky to do of course.

    Any tips?

  • #2
    Picking a decent line usually helps when you hit the deeper pea gravel. I tend to lean back and ride the bike off the rear wheel. Keep the front a little lighter and you can move your weight around to steer. I use the same style in deep sand as it usually effects the bike the same way. I also try not to chop the throttle too much but can give it some stick to get the arse end to slide to the line I want. You tend to countersteer a whole lot more on the dirtbike. I wouldn't worry where the arse end is aslong as the front is tracking straight

    this works for me. Hope it helps

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Taint.

      When I put my weight towards the back I feel like I am yanking the handlebars up. How do I keep the front grip relaxed or is this feeling of pulling upwards normal?

      Comment


      • #4
        There shouldn't be too much tension in your arms otherwise you end up forcing the bars around. I try to control the bike with my legs and weighting the pegs. Distribute your weight through your legs so you are not applying too much pressure on the bars otherwise when the front wheels skips to one side you end up pulling it back even further.

        Comment


        • #5
          Also keep the speed up and try not to turn unless you have to. The aquaplaning effect will keep you from bogging into it, also stay off the brakes if you can, simply rolling of fthe throttle and sinking in a bit will brake the bike to a decent degree.

          It will help to some degree, but if you want to ride through that terrain fast what you really need is the correct tyres and suspension setup. An agressive but well washing tread - it should be able to evacuate the mud from between your knobs easily but still bite in well. Suspension - from memory a softer setup works better in mud... sure someone will correct me if I am wrong there though.

          My guess what is happening at the moment is your tyres are getting blocked up with mud - meaning nothing really works because you have no grip whatsoever.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by out_in_front View Post
            My guess what is happening at the moment is your tyres are getting blocked up with mud - meaning nothing really works because you have no grip whatsoever.
            Good advice except there was no mud. It was as dry as a bone and very dusty out there yesterday.
            "Live Long and Prosper"

            Bayswater Martial Arts and Yoga Centre

            Comment


            • #7
              ride loose and grip with your legs , look ahead an dont look down your front guard

              Comment


              • #8
                i'll ask a silly question, but since you mention pulling back on the bars when moving your weight back, are you trying to move your whole body back?
                I usually just slide my butt back down the seat, keeping shoulders forward and end up in more of a crouched position when standing.
                I'm also of the school of thought "sit when you can, stand when you HAVE TO" very rarely find me standing up on smooth or boggy terrain unless there are whoops and bumps to bounce me off the seat, in that case stand just enough to let your legs do some of the suspensions work but not upright.
                Last edited by filbert; 26-04-2010, 01:01 PM. Reason: poorly worded
                Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by filbert View Post
                  silly question since you mention pulling back on the bars when moving your weight back, are you trying to move your whole body back?
                  What makes you the arbiter of a good question? Especially when you make the statement and then follow it up with one yourself.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i should reword that, i meant i felt i was asking a silly question.

                    and moving your weight back can be done with the hips keeping your shoulders in roughly the same position, i don't know how you ride or how much experience you have offroad, so i felt my question was silly not yours.
                    Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                    when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      oh okay - sorry about the misunderstanding then I am a noob at offroad. I have done a one day ride with West Coast through Nannup Balingup etc which covered varied terrain - sand, rocks, hills, mud, scree, water, single track.... It was awesome and successful if not exhausting. But then I had a bad tumble in a rut a few months later and have struggled to get my confidence back as I keep remembering how bad my poor leg felt when it crushed into the rut wall - it could have been concrete it was so bloody hard.

                      Anyway, I think my riding success to that point had been based on lady luck rather than any talent, so now I'm taking it slowly and 'trying' to develop some skills.
                      Last edited by Lolly; 26-04-2010, 01:08 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That misunderstanding was definitely my bad when i read it again after your post it sounded downright nasty lol, i raced MX as well as bush riding from 5 years old so very hard for me to explain technique or picture what it is that makes you feel uncomfortable getting your weight back, and for all i knew you could have been at or above the same level i peaked at so i was actually trying to avoid offence.
                        I've ridden with a lot of friends as new riders and they do seem to try to move their whole body back and end up arms straight pulling the bike up as though trying to wheelie, where if you bend at the hips but keep your arms relaxed and bent, you end up shoulders and head lower down with your butt just off the very back of the seat and it's quite stable and comfortable. If you can find a way to hold the bike upright safely you can practice moving your weight forward and backward on the seat and get a feel for what i mean, if you run a few searches on youtube for mx riders etc you should be able to see it clearer.
                        Do you remember the good old days before the internet?

                        when arguments were only entered into by the physically or intellectually able.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          .
                          Last edited by Uni; 26-04-2010, 02:25 PM. Reason: stupid injured-net
                          ^WHS

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by filbert View Post
                            i'll ask a silly question, but since you mention pulling back on the bars when moving your weight back, are you trying to move your whole body back?
                            I usually just slide my butt back down the seat, keeping shoulders forward and end up in more of a crouched position when standing.
                            Moving your main mass will have a bigger effect for a smaller movement, but of course, this comes down to personal preference.
                            A Proper standing position (well, attack position) is kind of a standing crouch as a rule.

                            Originally posted by filbert View Post
                            I'm also of the school of thought "sit when you can, stand when you HAVE TO" very rarely find me standing up on smooth or boggy terrain unless there are whoops and bumps to bounce me off the seat, in that case stand just enough to let your legs do some of the suspensions work but not upright.
                            I agree with your school of thought but it's your own riding style that dictates where this occurs. I stand pretty much stand everywhere at speed, it becomes habit. I'll sit for a tight flat corner or a berm and then use the next bump to stand up (a thousand squats in a day gets bloody tiring).
                            ^WHS

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Aaah - when you said 'slushy' i though you meant it was wet / muddy....

                              If you are talking about sand sections, again tyres could be a problem, also correct stance will help - with your arse hanging over the rear end of the seat to keep weight on your rear wheel and off the front (as Uni said)
                              Hard sections - If you are having the same problem, i really have no idea what is going wrong.... If it was rutted, chances are your wheels were going in seperate ruts, only experience will help there.

                              BTW what bike do you have and what tyres (and how much have they worn / what pressures)? would be usefull - if it's a chinese bike I would probably tell you to go and check every nut to see if some parts have come lose. If it's a jap bike it's probably more about the tyres than anything else, still could be a good idea to check wheel bearings / spoke tension etc.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X