Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do instructors really look for in a test?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What do instructors really look for in a test?

    Hello hello

    Im looking to sit my test soon, and have a few lessons lined up. Just curios, what do instructors really look for?
    I have been told a number of things like confidence and checking mirrors when overtaking etc. But are there any little things that they look for like, which side you get onto your bike, what foot you put down when stopped (ie, should you always have your foot on rear brake? or should you have foot on gears?)

    And a quick question, when riding in a single lane, it is correct to stay to the left of the 'oil strip' .. but on a dual lane road, you stay closer to the centre line?

    Thanks guys! Cant wait to get my license!!

  • #2
    you must read this http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...-e-test-26065/ if you haven't already.

    Your MC Instructor should be instructing you in the ways of riding correctly, this should allow you to pass your test.

    Head checks are a must, keeping the right foot on the brake while stopped is another must. Getting on the bike from the right only if you parked close to something and you got off this way, otherwise you're looking for a stack

    Left handside only when no traffic, then change to right handside when you get within 30m's of traffic in single lane.

    I think you need to talk to your Instructor are you ready, how much riding have you been doing, do you have a bike? If so grab a shadow from the shadow thread and get out there for some extra riding, they have a wealth of knowledge and will let you know if you are doing something wrong that will put you or someone else in danger.
    Last edited by Stoneville; 24-10-2007, 02:03 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      WSS

      Also book your test ASAP as there is quite a long wait for spots.
      Last edited by Hellboy; 24-10-2007, 02:01 PM.
      Down Under Riders - Motorcycle training and tuition
      Specialising in City West, Midland & Morley licensing centres
      Text or call 0404805085 Or visit www.downunderriders.com.au

      Comment


      • #4
        Basically, you need to demonstrate that you are not a danger to yourself or anyone else.

        ie, you need to be able to control the bike, position it so that you are safe, do head-checks properly and deal with situations as they are presented to you.
        “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

        Comment


        • #5
          Get plenty of riding time. Comfort and confidence on the bike will go a hell of a long way over just 'knowing' how to operate the vehicle.
          "No machine has a soul until a man shares his own with it."

          Comment


          • #6
            do head-checks properly and deal with situations as they are presented to you.[/quote]

            ....and that means do head checks ridculously obviously so that test guy riding behind you can see them and be convinced !?
            Life's short, stay close to the things that make you happy!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Like thro said, prove you aren't a danger to anyone including yourself. I think the main points are:

              a) Road awareness including head checks everywhere including side streets, mirror looking etc
              b) Good road craft via where you put yourself on the road in different situations and
              c) Good bike control - stopping, slow turning...

              All of above are alot easier with the more experience you have, such that everything is done naturally rather than thinking, look here, move over here, do this....

              Not that I'm experienced but just putting in my 2 bob

              Comment


              • #8
                Browneyedgirl - another one of my fav avtars ;P
                "ohh bartender another pint of kitty please" (even better would be if that's a middy)
                "Redlines are merely suggestions"
                "Stroked is fun, but I'ld rather get blown"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks guys

                  Ye I read Jo's thread, but thought Id ask a few other questions that were of concern to me. I have a bike, but have not been out on a real lesson yet. I have ridden with my mate and feel confident on the road (been motocrossing for over a year, so pretty good at handling my bike)
                  I just wanted to know some rules now so I can practice them with my mate.. and it'll be a good habit. I got a lesson coming up, so Ill ask him then! Im just eager to know now!!

                  Thanks!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I heard they were coming down hard on people leaving their indicators on after turning because of the number of bikes accidents these days... I can't remember the exact number but it was something like if its more than 7 flashes after a turning and its a instant fail. Well thats what I was told when I got my RE this time last year at city west.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jezzza View Post
                      Thanks guys

                      Ye I read Jo's thread, but thought Id ask a few other questions that were of concern to me. I have a bike, but have not been out on a real lesson yet. I have ridden with my mate and feel confident on the road (been motocrossing for over a year, so pretty good at handling my bike)
                      I just wanted to know some rules now so I can practice them with my mate.. and it'll be a good habit. I got a lesson coming up, so Ill ask him then! Im just eager to know now!!

                      Thanks!!

                      OK, if you have dirt bike experience, then you will probably feel comfortable on the bike already (and will need less kays to get used to it).

                      I'd practice:

                      - e stops. If you're comfortable with the front brake, etc you may be able to knock that one off in a morning. the 12 metres you need to beat is really pitiful on a half decent bike with good technique.

                      - o turns - keep your head up, look where you're going, make sure you indicate and head check properly (have someone watch you and honestly tell you whether or not you are)

                      - be hungry for information. head check religiously before shifting lanes or shifting in your own lane. look down side streets - if everything in front and to the sides looks cool, perhaps head check behind you for that dickhead in a commodore who's about to run you over, etc. look for people trying to kill you, and you will find them.

                      - get someone experienced, or ideally an instructor to give you the run down/tips/supervision on road positioning - and if it's not obvious, ask the question "why is this position the best one to be in". once you get the idea of what you're trying to do (basically, create the biggest buffer between you and obstacles, and keep escape routes open) it will make more sense and you'll start doing it at more of a subconscious level, rather than trying to remember (by rote) "on a road with no traffic island, i should be further left" etc...

                      if you're comfortable on teh bike and can control it - you're halfway there. however, it's the other half (roadcraft) thats more likely to save your arse.
                      Last edited by thro; 25-10-2007, 01:22 AM.
                      “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What thro said.

                        Regarding getting on the bike, a "good" stopping distance from the curb is that you should be able to get off your bike, stand facing your bike and not be standing on the curb when you do it.

                        Do some work with shadows where possible. 9zero was brilliant for me - didn't teach me any roadcraft because he didn't want to influence my learning, but he did spot me on all of my errors, headchecks, laugh at me when I almost fell or hit curbs, teach me how to do a slow speed turn into a 10؛ hill, teach me how to ride on footpaths...

                        ... ignore that last one. Point is, they spot you on your errors and it's great fun doing it.
                        Dual sport riders do it in the dirt

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Supercharged1600 View Post
                          Browneyedgirl - another one of my fav avtars ;P
                          "ohh bartender another pint of kitty please" (even better would be if that's a middy)

                          ...makes me laugh too !
                          Life's short, stay close to the things that make you happy!!

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X