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New to Riding? Looking for a 250? A guide for n00bs..

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  • #91
    I've managed to get a Westpac Flexiloan I reduced to $7,500. Now I'm considering a 2010 Kawa ninja 250r, it's a black one that's got 4 thou on the clock for sale at $6400. Showroom condition.

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    • #92
      when i was looking for my 250 i looked around on gumtree and went and had a look at some of the bikes and got one at realy good price just think if the bike can make it thru the first year you will probaly sell the bike and get a bigger one when you get you r class so no point buying a brand new bike as a 250 as save your money for the bike you realy want when you go bigger class my 2 cents is buy a 250 you can afford and ride for the year then get r class and buy the one you want to ride
      I HAD A BREEZE UP MY SHORTS AND IT FELT LIKE CHRISTMAS!!

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Reggex View Post

        EDIT: Another noob question regarding gear if you guys don't mind. I didn't know where else to put it. What do you guys think about this jacket and these kevlar pants?

        Reg
        kevlar pants you can get from kitbag just near midland for $99 and riding jackets you can get for $150 from 5 star yamaha near freo go try them on and save some coin too
        I HAD A BREEZE UP MY SHORTS AND IT FELT LIKE CHRISTMAS!!

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        • #94
          Originally posted by lippy View Post
          kevlar pants you can get from kitbag just near midland for $99 and riding jackets you can get for $150 from 5 star yamaha near freo go try them on and save some coin too
          I'm about 5 minutes from kit bag. as soon as I read that I headed straight over but they were shut

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          • #95
            Originally posted by Reggex View Post
            I've managed to get a Westpac Flexiloan I reduced to $7,500. Now I'm considering a 2010 Kawa ninja 250r, it's a black one that's got 4 thou on the clock for sale at $6400. Showroom condition.
            sounds pretty good to me, give it a test ride. i loved the ninja but i only had 4k and that had to include gear. one thing you should take into account is gear if you dont already have it, i dont believe that you should look for an old cheap bike if you dont have to, if you have the money get what you want you are the one who is going to ride it. but consider the fact that a 2010 ninja is pretty much the same as an 08,09 ninja, so go see if you can find one cheaper, i have found alot on the net around australia for 5.4k with less kms then that and in showroom condition
            Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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            • #96
              I'm looking more at resale value. Although the bikes are extremely similar throughout the years, somebody a year and a half or so from now would buy a 2010 over a 2008 come time for me to get my bigger bike. There's a few red and blue 08-09's floating around for $5,5 but I'm very partial to the green and black. Thanks for the heads up with the gear. I've taken that and insurance into account. Expensive stuff. Hopefully I never have to experience what it's built for

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              • #97
                were you gonna get full comp, cause ninjas are a bit dear, plus try get a package deal if possible for gear, picked up 900 dollars worth of gear for $700 but i did buy a bike from the dealer. you could be a prick and go and try everything on in a store and get your size for everything and then get it all on ebay, i have seen alot of new cheap stuff on ebay.

                p.s i dont really think you will lose to much on resale if you keep it in good nick, you should be able to get 4-5 for it in a few years. one thing i noticed about learner bikes is over time depreciation is very low, there is rapid depreciation for the first 2-3 years then it just evens out, look at the old ninja models they still cost a bit for there age. which is a pain in the ass if you are trying to get a good cheap bike.
                Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

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                • #98
                  Cheers mate, definately a big help : ).

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                  • #99
                    Resale on 250's is generally pretty good in WA at least. I know some of our dealers do guaranteed buy by back on bikes that haven't been dropped. Not sure what other brands or dealers offer, although I think if a dealer can afford to do it then you would probably get more privately. Hunters come with 2 years unlimited kay warranty and its transferable to the new owner. Do you still only have to have your licence for a year before you can go open class?

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                    • hi ya all. I have'nt been on a long time, because i moved to Sydney and now i am back. I have been eying on the 2011 Honda CBR250R. I got told by Honda the price will be direct competition with Kawa's 'Skittle' Ninja 250! I heard some good review and wonder if anyone else got good and bad comment. As i'm 110kg, a 125c.c just won't do me any more.

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                      • Originally posted by HONDA CBR125R View Post
                        hi ya all. I have'nt been on a long time, because i moved to Sydney and now i am back. I have been eying on the 2011 Honda CBR250R. I got told by Honda the price will be direct competition with Kawa's 'Skittle' Ninja 250! I heard some good review and wonder if anyone else got good and bad comment. As i'm 110kg, a 125c.c just won't do me any more.
                        Get the ninja.

                        Edit: http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...ctures-117086/
                        Originally posted by JIM.55
                        knowlage dosnt always trumph

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                        • umm why, how much longer have you got on your RE?? Wouldn't it be better to sava da money and get a 600->1000cc bike?

                          Or are you new to bikes?? if so, buy someone else's cast off 250 and then do the above

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                          • ^^ this.

                            for the cost of the CBR250R you could get a secondhand 600 or thou which will be far more capable of happily dealing with your size/weight.
                            “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                            • Nice work Aphex - bloody good write up. Even if my brain is partly melted from looking at your avatar for too long.

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                              • Just passing this on...

                                Hey guys, I wrote this for a mate and his old man who are in the process of getting their L's but thought it may be helpful to others.

                                Okay so here's the basics.... This stuff pretty much relates to all size bike engines but of course the bigger the donk the more power produced generally speaking and each make has its own characteristics.

                                Single cylinder, eg Yamaha Scorpio 225: Less maintenance due to less moving parts. Simple/cheap to service. Average amount of power output but hey all 250s are slow compared to 'big' bikes. I believe the new Honda CB250R is a single cylinder 250cc faired sporty machine but what i have heard of them is a general bad reaction to the styling/concept. Less power on a 250 can be good to learn technique safely then when u get the R6 you hone those skills. I have never ridden a single cylinder bike - disclaimer disclaimer disclaimer.

                                Summary: Simple, cheap, get the job done kind of bike.

                                Twin cylinder - usually v-twin in a 250cc bike, eg Honda VTR 250 can be parallel twin in bigger bikes (The Yammie TDM 900 I showed you is a parallel twin). I will focus on V configuration here: Looks like this I front on or like this V side on, hence the name. Sounds the f'n bomb!! Twins are the 'rumbling' engines... like Harleys and other cruisers are v twins for example. They go 'patoom patoom patoom patoom' like a heart beat. The VTR is slick man, slick. It isn't a cruiser though but what they call a 'naked sports bike'. Looks hot, all the girls will want your babies - it is 'naked' - no plastics, as opposed to 'faired' - plastic encasing the frame/engine (the R6 is a faired sports bike). Advantages = less to repair if you unfortunately drop it. Plastic (called fairings) on bikes = $$$ to fix. Naked bikes are easier to service as you don't have to spend time removing the fairings. Twins have lots of torque, that is, usable power at low engine revs. That means you don't have to make it scream its box off to get it moving. V twins are very forgiving. This means for example at a roundabout when u must go fairly slow PLUS you have the complication of leaning AND turning, if you are in too high a gear (say u have it in 4th for example where as 2nd would be better) you will get round safely enough with a bit of control and medium revs. On other bikes 4th gear needs lots of revs, therefore bike stalls, and a stalled bike with no power to keep it balanced and rolling = a horizontal bike = OUCH! Do you get the idea that I like twins!!!!! And bikes with two cylinders are good too ;-) (I dated a twin once but that's a whole other email) So what’s the disadvantage? Relatively expensive for a 250, which most people hang on to for only 12 months. But wait there is another advantage... they hold their value pretty well so look after it and you will re-coop a decent proportion of your outlayed coin. If you feel like having every Tom, Dick and Harry pull the piss out of you then buy a Hyosung GT250 Comet (naked) or GT250R (faired sports). They are quite large framed for a small capacity bike, I believe the frame size is the same as their 650cc bikes so more suited to taller peoples. They are Korean hence the piss-pulling but they are a cheaper option with decent kit as standard and a stack of newbies seem to be buying them and are actually happy with their toy. Your choice.

                                Summary: Distinctive engine note (especially when down-shifting through gears), more pricey but popular enough to gain good resale, forgiving from a gearing point of view but at the same time has character.

                                Triple cylinder – no 250 or similar size I know of is a Triple. Triples are mainly the domain of Triumph, a UK built bike and they start at 675cc... u heard of a Daytona? If u like the R6... the Daytona may appeal to you also. They are an ‘inline’ 3 cylinder configuration like this III looking front on. They have a sound somewhere between the rumble of a twin and the familiar whine of a traditional 4 cylinder sportsbike ie – the beloved R6 (see down below). I have not ridden one, only alongside and mainly behind one who is my mate that came along for the test ride of my current SFV650. Let me just say that acceleration-wise it left mine for dead (either that or I really am a pussy!) and in the Graham Farmer tunnel that thing sounded Demonic! An acquired taste quite possibly, but those that own one seem converted to never own anything else again.

                                Summary: Read again in at least 12 months time...


                                Four Cylinder – Firstly the most common configuration is an ‘inline’ 4 cylinder, that is 4 cylinders across the bike in a line like this IIII looking front on. This makes for a wide engine so best suited to ‘faired’ bikes where the plastic will shield the rider from heat and direct air around the block for dynamics. These bikes are generally considered the smoothest to ride, basically because the working load is spread out over four smaller cylinders as opposed to a couple or even one bigger cylinder. This your R6. You will hear people say twins have a lot of ‘low down’ power delivery with not much at the ‘top end’ whereas in-line 4cyl engines have a more ‘linear’ power delivery and quite often liked being revved hard to give you great ‘top end’ power. What this means is as alluded to in the Twin Cylinder section, you’ll get away with a high gear at low revs/low speed. A 4 cyl however operates better at high revs in a high gear and starts to develop more power in the higher rev range as you twist the throttle more. A twin will start to lack power at higher revs, so in-line 4’s make for great Superbikes... you know the R6/R1 of course, then there is the Suzuki GSX-R600/750/1000, the Kawasaki ZX10-R (Ninja) and the Honda CBR1000RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR to infinity (jokes). These are your whining, slick looking, racy, faired Rossi/Valentino bikes. My real world experience on this type of bike is the Suzuki Across 250cc which was my learner steed for 17months or so. I liked the bike itself, but my taste was for naked twins (how YOU doin?) so I saved my coin, passed my R class and got a SV650. Good solid motors, proven reliable, and popular. The bad: Like to be revved hard so can be hard to master if you don’t have an understanding of gear ratios. For 250cc’s........As they like to be revved it will sound like you are doing 160kph when in reality you are accelerating to 80kmh to get away from the Volvo driving soccer mum who thinks she is the only vehicle on the road. More moving parts = more maintenance $$.

                                Secondly there is the ‘V4’ configuration looking like II front on or V side on. It is two V-twins next to each other... kinda like the engine in your ute chopped in half!!! Not any V4 250s that I know of. In big capacity bikes there is the Honda VFR800 and newly released VFR1200 that I am familiar with. They offer some characteristics of a twin, with the advantage of more cylinders to smooth the ride. The V4’s are often a ‘sports/tourer’ type of bike with fairings and luggage options – aimed at mature travelling gents basically. Come back and read in 30 yrs time.

                                Summary: Okay, so you love the R6.... Thes in line 4’s are your territory then. Here is a guide to some 4 cyl inline 250’s:

                                Kawasaki: ZZR (Ninja) – heavy and underpowered – pretty good looking

                                GPX – a dressed down ZZR, lighter, looks good still, heaps for sale at decent prices

                                ZX2R – Quick for a 250, sporty looks, getting a bit old but still fetch top dollar. My bro-in-law owned one for like 2 years and now he rides a beasty TL1000R V-twin Superbike... so he must have learnt something about how to ride on his ZXR.

                                Suzuki: GSX250F Across – Good all round 250. Has a locker where fuel tank normally is that can store ur Lid (helmet’s are commonly called a ‘Lid’ by riders) or some groceries. Fuel goes under the seat and is therefore smaller capacity but still adequate. This was my first bike and I liked it. I got a decent enough one for under $2,000.

                                Honda: CBR250R/CBR250RR – Popular sports bike, looks the business, a million modifications available to make them ‘one of the quickest 250’s’ as you will see in ads.

                                CBF250 – Naked, more upright seating position. Sports bikes tend to have you positioned so ure leaning forward and the weight down ur arms can lead to sore wrists.


                                So that pretty much exhausts my knowledge on the subject. There are bikes out there that may be suitable which I have not mentioned. Some will be imports that I have little experience with – I think the ZX2R may be an import. Some may be rare or no longer produced but still a viable option if picked up at the right price... Some people swear by the Kawasaki Balius and Honda Spada for example... google them J You will notice the majority of this is centred around Japanese bikes... because they dominate the Australian market. This is due to good trading practises in place, good dollar rate and our 250cc restricted licence rules in WA. Not too many, if any, European manufactures do 250cc road bikes... the rules are different there and they can hop on bigger capacity bikes that have been de-tuned to limit their power output. Similar to what is called LAMS (Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme) in almost every other Oz state bar Wait Awhile (W.A.)



                                Now get out there, get your L’s if you’ve not done so already and ride every bastard you can until you find the one that............... as we say on PSB........ “Gives you the biggest boner!”



                                Ace.
                                Be patient or become one.

                                Ride with Passion. Ride with Purpose. Ride with Pride.

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