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Cbf 250 U-Turns

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  • Cbf 250 U-Turns

    Well I passed my test in March on a Cb 250 and passed the o-turns with flying colours and for the first time since I tried to do a u-turn on a road 5-6m wide on my own Cbf 250 and almost dropped it. I can't remember how wide the o-turn distance in the test was since it has been a few months but should I be able to do a u-turn on a road 6m wide without nearly dropping it and I have lost the ability to do that due to not using it and have to now practice to get it back or do Cbf's not turn as quickly as cb's or was the road just to thin?

    As a bit of extra information, my Cbf 250 has 300k's on it and the problem I had doing the turn was that it felt like it was going to stall and I had to clutch in which meant I lost power and the bike stopped (this is when I nearly dropped it). On the instructors bike I used to just drag the back brake in first without any throttle when doing O-turns but on my bike I am 100% sure it will stall if I do this.
    Originally Posted by Maxo
    do people around you constantly wear their palm on their face?
    to Butters

  • #2
    slip the clutch and keep the revs up, whilst dragging the rear brake slightly through the corner...

    the road was fine, its just the technique, get out there and practise some more

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    • #3
      yeah i found cbf250s a lot revvier and had a stronger back brake than the old cb250, you'll find it a lot different to do but still just as easy. try being a little lighter on the back brake and engage and disengage over and over to get a feel for it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by -Stevo- View Post
        slip the clutch and keep the revs up, whilst dragging the rear brake slightly through the corner...

        the road was fine, its just the technique, get out there and practise some more
        as Stevo said and,
        I generally teach my students to have the rear brake dragging slightly before they begin the O turn (so the bike is settled and you are also prepared). And Turn your head BEFORE you Turn the bike, that way you are looking at where you want to go and not looking at the KERB..
        where you look is where you go..

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        • #5
          get to just past friction point, with plenty of revs (say 2000-3000 on a 250?)
          control speed with rear brake (leave throttle and clutch alone as much as possible).

          dont be afraid to use more revs, the bike won't go anywhere without you letting the clutch out and the brake off....
          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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          • #6
            You should be able to do o-turns within 2m both sides, ride the rear brake whilst having enough speed to turn (If you a trying to do a sharp u-turn I pull the clutch in and roll riding the rear brake) and ride the clutch if you need more speed.
            Pieceapiss
            Degreaser?

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            • #7
              Thanks for the tips everyone. I went down to a deserted car park after posting that to get a better feel for low speed manoeuvres and found the bike can go a lot slower then I thought (when I tried the u-turn and nearly dropped it was going 18kph when I started the turn). In the car park I practiced full lock turns and found I could also turn a lot tighter then I thought (massively out of practice) but was still nowhere near being a 2m turn. :o
              Originally Posted by Maxo
              do people around you constantly wear their palm on their face?
              to Butters

              Comment


              • #8
                You should be able to a full u turn in a width of roughly 1.5 car bays(instead of estimating 2m), i managed it on a cbf easily. It's a little bit harder on the gpx, but still possible.

                When I was learning, I practiced u-turns ridiculously often, just keep at it and it gets easier

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gixxerguy View Post
                  ... and found the bike can go a lot slower then I thought (when I tried the u-turn and nearly dropped it was going 18kph when I started the turn).
                  You should be able to manoeuvre your bike at walking speed. it's really worth learning how.

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                  • #10
                    For my test, I did them at about 5 km/h, and they were well inside a car length.

                    I was on a CBF250 with 380km on it.
                    '====
                    //`
                    -Magilla
                    They observe my perambulations upon my gyroscopically-balanced personal transportation device, and I perceive at my core that they have thus concluded that I am Caucasian, and, while intelligent, I am also somewhat socially inept. - Peculiar Alfred
                    Eligible to shadow R & R-E NOW

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                    • #11
                      I was practising the other day, getting to be a real smartarse about how slow I could do it, and tried it just that little bit too slow.

                      Overbalanced, and only managed to hold it up thanks to the footpeg.

                      That said, it's a commuter bike, and therefore I'd imagine it'd be one of the best bikes for manouvres like that.
                      Originally posted by Dragunov-21
                      If you want me to answer a question, I want you to ask one that doesn't put words in my mouth that were never there.

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                      • #12
                        The rear brake thing works a charm. I remember having troubles nailing it every time, and soon as I started riding the rear brake I found it so much easier.

                        I have to do the test again soon on the ZX..... not looking forward to it. Trying to do U turns within the allocated distance on that thing is a mole. Just need more practice on it myself I guess.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by blacky View Post
                          You should be able to manoeuvre your bike at walking speed. it's really worth learning how.

                          This. Its all about keeping the revs up and riding that brake... Once you get good at it you should be able to do it slower than normal walking pace, even...
                          “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Long long time ago, when I was taught the U-turn, I was told to start practicing with wide ones and start narrowing down. Worked really well for me. Worth giving a try.

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                            • #15
                              ^^ also, its good to just practice riding slow. Even if you're not doing u-turns, just see how slow you can ride. This will give you a feel for how to keep the bike stable at low speed.

                              Whenever i come to a red light or stop sign, I'm usually seeing how slow I can get before stopping and having to put a foot down....


                              Its just practice.....
                              “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                              Comment

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