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the perceived pressure to get a BIG bike after 12 months.

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  • the perceived pressure to get a BIG bike after 12 months.

    Just finnished an interesting conversation with a fellow PSB er who is still on Restricted license.
    It is widly preceived that once the 12 mnds are done the race is on to get R class license and one seems to feel obliged to get a BIG bike!
    Why would you buy a bigger bike if you feel happy punting your VTR/ZZR or what ever you have while being on a open licence.
    Or wait till the need comes to get the bike YOU dream off.
    The above mentioned bikes, and all the others not mentioned ,are more that powerfull enough to satisfy a fair few motorcyclsts in their choosen ride style.
    Might be a little bit the same with some who want to ride the latest bike out.
    If you want to do that great, but if you do not then that should be it.
    My "newest" bike I have is from 1998 and I do not see myself getting a much newer one sometime soon.
    OTHER THAN THAT WINNING ONE!!
    I think that the individuallism of ridding what YOU want is the BIG attraction of riding and feeling FREE.
    feel free to discuss this at invernatum and do not forget to buy plenty of tickets for the sensational MAD R1 Rossi replica!
    Last edited by Jamathi; 01-10-2009, 05:47 PM. Reason: spellung

  • #2
    for me i think it was choice of bikes available.
    now i can legally ride whatever the hell i want regardless of size.
    Need a website designer? PM me for a quote.
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    • #3
      Lots of people think that a bigger bike will disguise their lack of ability on a bike. And it does, in a straight line, until they get to a corner.

      Also bikes are largely about image and ego, so combine these factors together, and the quintessential R1 squid is born.
      For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
      For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

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      • #4
        Not sure if most other people notice this, but it's mainly people that don't ride bikes that start the whole ego thing of "why didn't you get a litre bike"...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by swish50 View Post
          Not sure if most other people notice this, but it's mainly people that don't ride bikes that start the whole ego thing of "why didn't you get a litre bike"...
          you mean people who hear you talking about your bike and butt into your conversation with a "oh i had a mate at work with an R1...blah blah blah... oh you've only got a 600 hmm ..."??????
          Need a website designer? PM me for a quote.
          Here are some sites I've done recently - Velocity Race Team | Business Insurance | West Perth Insurance Broker | Labour Hire | Final Trim Operators

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          • #6
            I've started a bit of a storm in the 250 pictures thread, for suggesting that I trade my CBF250 in with only 3 months on my R-E, to go back to Ls for the last 9 months. The reasoning behind my thoughts:

            My friends all suck to ride with - they have far quicker bikes, and don't want to wait around while I ring it out in every gear to make it to 110, so:
            (1) Riding with my friends sucks. Therefore, going back to my Ls, meaning that I can't ride with them is fine by me.
            I want to be able to do highway work, and the CBF can't keep up with me sitting on it.
            (2) Riding where I want to be riding sucks, therefore going back to my Ls, meaning that I can't ride there without a shadow is an improvement, because when I do get to go, I'll be a lot more comfortable.
            I happen to hate this style of bike. It's a great, cheap commuter, but I can't commute on it, because I have to drive computers and monitors around.
            (3) I don't like my bike, and it's not all that functionally useful to me.
            (4) Given the above, the sooner I get rid of the CBF, the less I lose on the deal.

            They probably aren't great reasons in the scheme of things, but they are enough to make me think about changing.
            '====
            //`
            -Magilla
            They observe my perambulations upon my gyroscopically-balanced personal transportation device, and I perceive at my core that they have thus concluded that I am Caucasian, and, while intelligent, I am also somewhat socially inept. - Peculiar Alfred
            Eligible to shadow R & R-E NOW

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            • #7
              i got my bike for travel to work and the 250 is doing great but after the 12 months is up the choice to go bigger bikes would be great but for one thing is money hard enough to covince the wife to get a 250 and fork out for lessons and tests so to do it again in 12 months little bit to much money to out lay until the 250 dies
              I HAD A BREEZE UP MY SHORTS AND IT FELT LIKE CHRISTMAS!!

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              • #8
                It's not a perceived pressure at all, it's a "Bigger, better, faster, MOAR!" mentality from the rider himself.
                I don't think it's peer driven in the slightest.

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                • #9
                  I've bought an RS125 couple of weeks ago because I wanted something a little bit "sportier" while I'm on my RE. After talking to a few people around here I might just decide to keep it for years now.

                  I really like the styling and the weight (lack of), plus there's a bit of room to get a few more herbs out of it should I choose once the skills pick up. Sure I'll never get it up over 200km/h but I'm sure it will eventually make a fun, lightweight, alternative track bike in 2 or 3 years.

                  And save the 848 Duke for wheelies, impressing the ladies, the lady boys, and the street cred.



                  My 2c
                  Ass is back on a Super Sport!!!

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                  • #10
                    Desmo jim it was expressed in the conversation that there seems to be this preasure.
                    I do not feel it and maybe it is not there (for some/most of us) ,but.....
                    some people do seem to feel it I think maynly with the people who have started riding not so long ago, or at least questioning it as being unsure what to do or if it is the natural path of becoming a MC rider.

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                    • #11
                      I just got my R class today and already have a new bike in the works (just need finance to come through ) and I find the people who put the most pressure on us to upgrade are non riders. I waited long enough for my gpx to get boring and feeling sluggish before I decided to upgrade, which was around 18 months or so.

                      The pressure is there from the outside community (mainly friends), but if your smart enough to wait until YOU are ready for the upgrade then thats the best way to go about it imo.
                      Originally posted by browncow
                      Sometimes, I see you post, and I understand what all the individual words mean, but I have no idea what you're actually saying.

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                      • #12
                        If you feel pressured seriously man up and grow a pair.

                        Ride what you want kids, I'm thankful for the advice my riding peers have given me. I went from the raptor to the 954 because the model gave me wood and I trusted myself enough to be able to handle it, turns out in my opinion it's easier to ride than the raptor. I bought myself the raptor as my first big bike as the thought of 150hp scared the fuck out of me and no amount of "get a gixxer 1000 you homo" quelled the fear

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                        • #13
                          I think Desmo's a bit closer to home. It's the want of faster,better etc. I would've been happier with my cbr250 if it had better suspension with much more room to adjust it, a bit more power for down the main straight at barbs, and it looked a bit better. Since there was nothing in the 250 range that satisfied me, and nothing in the 400 range I really wanted either I went the 600. I might've stayed longer if there happened to be an kawahondasuki inline-4 250cc which had all the updated technologies of todays 600s and 1000s. Commuting is a whole different story.

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                          • #14
                            I've had my RE about 3 months now and i cant wait till i can go for a big bike, mainly due to physical size of the bike.
                            I am comfortable on my 250 but i do feel a lil bit like donkey kong sittin on it.

                            I will most likely go for a litre bike, i considered something around the 600-750cc but firgured i would buy something like that then in a year or so want to sell and get the litre bike. Probably selling the mid sized bike at a loss so there is also the financial aspect of it.
                            B19 Oakford V.B.F.S

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Desmogod View Post
                              It's not a perceived pressure at all, it's a "Bigger, better, faster, MOAR!" mentality from the rider himself.
                              I don't think it's peer driven in the slightest.
                              I half agree.
                              I wouldn't call it a peer pressure thing, but the 12 month rule definitely creates a situation where you almost feel expected to upgrade at the end of it.
                              I've been riding my GPX for 2 and a half years now, partially because I can't afford a new bike, but also partially because I still have the time of my life riding it. I still do my fair share of excessive speed, and throwing a lightweight bike around a tight corner is still just as thrilling. But I can't count how many times I've been asked "why haven't you upgraded yet?", and "aren't you bored of how slow they are?", and told "when you ride a big bike you'll be sick of the 250".

                              For the record, I HAVE ridden big bikes and it didn't make me love my GPX any less.
                              - Spuddy: Music, motorbike, gaming, socialising and drinking enthusiast. Man about town!
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