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  • Anodising a aluminium frame....

    Hi all,

    Anyone re anodised a rgv frame? I am curious how they work around the inserts.

    Thanks
    Tony
    Last edited by topcat; 26-11-2013, 06:49 PM.

  • #2
    Think you might have to drill them out and put new ones in after the frame has been re-anodised. This is what I am doing on a swing arm, drilled the inserts out, just need to get the arm re-anodised and fit new inserts.

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    • #3
      We're the inserts easy to find?

      Comment


      • #4
        I believe that the frame is made of both Cast and Extruded sections......so unless you are Happy with a Two-tone colour scheme in it's natural finish, it might be better in a Darker shade OR even Painted/Powder-coated
        Rules are for the Obedience of Fools and the Guidance of Wise men. Douglas Bader.

        Only two things are Infinite, the Universe and Human Stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. Albert Einstein.

        Three can keep a Secret, if Two of them are Dead. Benjamin Franklin.

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        • #5
          I just have a few shiny spots on a frame it looks like the anodizing has worn off and i want to get a clean look..... maybe i am being too pedantic.....

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          • #6
            You can get a rivnut kit from Coventrys. There are 2 types of rivnuts, thin sheet which have a very thin head, and the standard ones which have a head about 1.2mm ( at a guess ) thick. If you have a kit but the wrong inserts, you can buy the inserts individually or in pacs or 10 from Covs. 6mm thinsheet was 28cents each I think it was.

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            • #7
              Bought a rivnut kit online from a uk seller, came with the tool and lots of alloy and steel inserts, great bit of kit.
              Lovely 1974 Honda Mt250 For Sale! (See my website below

              Click to see My Projects: Yamaha RZ350 F1 YPVS, Honda XL500R, SL125, KTMaha Supermoto, RD350LC Hybrid - Athena 421cc, Honda MT250

              My other interests: PloProf.com and DeskDivers.com

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              • #8
                But how do you get the remaining rivnut out of the frame, when they anodise the frame it will react and damage the aluminium it is in contact with... And rattle as well

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                • #9
                  Before you go to time and effort sourcing and removing rivnuts, call an anodiser or two and tell them what you're after. I found that they'll do extruded (tube) style swing arms, but most won't touch cast aluminium due to the finish being unpredictable. The one company I did find did a cast alloy top triple clamp for me, the result was less than impressive. This is why I chose to have my RS250 frame painted instead.
                  Click Link for My Bikes:

                  Aprilia RS250
                  1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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                  • #10
                    As above, I've not heard of a success story yet.

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                    • #11
                      Probably also worth noting that the anodising creates a reaaly hard surface layer, not sure how this will affect a flexing frame - could it cause a reduced fatigue life? or increase it? I know hard things don't like to flex, so It could start micro-cracks in the surface, which will propagate... That being said - treatments like shot peening (also creating a hard surface layer) are known to increase fatigue life in steels...

                      It would be interesting to see any studies into it.

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                      • #12
                        It came from the factory anodized, and Majestic Aluminium Anodizing in the UK can do it. so it must be able to be done.
                        RGV Frame & Build Progress - RGV Engine & Electrical Problems - RGV250 Forums

                        I've emailed Amir at Majestic and he suggested vapour blasting prior to anodizing.

                        "Hi Craig,

                        Apologies for the delay in getting back to you. I have been away for a couple of weeks and only returned to work yesterday.

                        It’s not something we usually do but looking at your situation, I will offer you some advice on this occasion. You should try vapour blasting the part first prior to the anodising process. With casts you generally get a lot of silica coming of the parts which will leave you with a very dull finish. The vapour blasting may just solve this issue for you. One of the other reasons we are able to process these frames correctly is that we manufacture all our chemicals in house and this plays a big part with different grades of aluminium during the anodising process.

                        Good luck with the anodising and the Ashes."

                        I'm going to do some more research on the net (remember Americans spell it "aluminum" and "anodizing") and try to sort out in my own head how to do it, then email Amir again and tell him my plans and ask if he thinks that's the right way to do it. I'll offer to pay for his advice too.
                        Then I'll go back to Anomed Industries (Bill, from memory) in Osborne Park and ask if he can have a go at it.
                        1993 Suzuki RGV250SP (VJ22)
                        1996 Suzuki RGV250 (VJ22)
                        1996 Suzuki RGV250SP (VJ23)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by guppy View Post
                          It came from the factory anodized, and Majestic Aluminium Anodizing in the UK can do it. so it must be able to be done.
                          RGV Frame & Build Progress - RGV Engine & Electrical Problems - RGV250 Forums

                          I've emailed Amir at Majestic and he suggested vapour blasting prior to anodizing.

                          "Hi Craig,

                          Apologies for the delay in getting back to you. I have been away for a couple of weeks and only returned to work yesterday.

                          It’s not something we usually do but looking at your situation, I will offer you some advice on this occasion. You should try vapour blasting the part first prior to the anodising process. With casts you generally get a lot of silica coming of the parts which will leave you with a very dull finish. The vapour blasting may just solve this issue for you. One of the other reasons we are able to process these frames correctly is that we manufacture all our chemicals in house and this plays a big part with different grades of aluminium during the anodising process.

                          Good luck with the anodising and the Ashes."

                          I'm going to do some more research on the net (remember Americans spell it "aluminum" and "anodizing") and try to sort out in my own head how to do it, then email Amir again and tell him my plans and ask if he thinks that's the right way to do it. I'll offer to pay for his advice too.
                          Then I'll go back to Anomed Industries (Bill, from memory) in Osborne Park and ask if he can have a go at it.
                          Bill's a good bloke - he helped me decide on a course of action with my RS250 frame and swingarm, as did Advanced Anodizing and Electro Plating in Kelmscott. He also did the top triple clamp I mentioned above. Here are some things to consider:

                          The Aprilia's frame and swingarm were both made of cast sections and extruded sections.
                          Bill helped me determine that some sections were anodized, others not.
                          AAEP wouldn't touch either the frame or swingarm due to the cast sections and also the rivnuts being likely to blow a hole through the aluminium.
                          Bill needs to strip the old anodizing prior to anodizing the bare aluminium.
                          Stripping the old anodizing involves acid-bathing the frame/swingarm.
                          Acid bathing destroys polished finishes, including bearing journals, so you have to spend a fair amount of time doing these again.
                          And even after all of this, the anodizing looks dull and patchy on cast surfaces.

                          To me, it's not worth the time and effort for the risk involved in getting a poor outcome. I'm sure it can be done. But just like having Nikasil-lined cylinders re-plated I don't think that WA is the place to be for it.
                          Click Link for My Bikes:

                          Aprilia RS250
                          1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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                          • #14
                            Yeah I may well just end up having to powdercoat the frame and swingarm.
                            I agree that "I don't think that WA is the place to be or it" - but that's not good enough, in my opinion.
                            If I gave up that easily I wouldn't have a vj23...

                            anyway, does anybody have any smashed frames or swingarms I can trial with?

                            and topcat, sorry for hijacking your thread, I'll be looking into this properly once I've finished rebuilding the "unserviceable" rear shock (assuming I don't stuff it up). i'll pm you once I get into it to see if you're interested in nutting this out too.
                            1993 Suzuki RGV250SP (VJ22)
                            1996 Suzuki RGV250 (VJ22)
                            1996 Suzuki RGV250SP (VJ23)

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                            • #15
                              I like your attitude. I wanted a Fiat 20V Coupe at one stage - genuine WRX beaters. In the UK they were selling them to the government as part of the Cash In A Wreck scheme. Here in WA, $20,000+. "Not in WA" isn't an excuse, it's a realisation based on economics. Besides, having had my RS250 frame painted I'm happier than I would have been with it re-annodized back to standard.

                              Same case with the Sachs rear shock - also considered by some to be "unserviceable". It's not, it's just that I bought a far superior Nitron shock for the same price to pay someone to rebuild the Sachs here in WA.
                              Click Link for My Bikes:

                              Aprilia RS250
                              1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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