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  • Looking at rgv tomorrow

    hey

    I'm going to go have another look at a 1995 rgv tomorrow, its done 30,000 km and looks to be in good nick. if all goes well, get monies together and pick her up Wednesday.

    anyway is there anything in particular to rgv's that i should look for before i buy.

    it felt like there was a bit of oil on the forks last time i was there but the light was bad, have another look tomorrow in the day light. not sure how much it is to fix?

    looked like it has had a minor drop, just a few scratches on the right mirror, pegs, and zorst. the fairings looked in great nick for its age.

    also any tips for riding it will be my first ride on a 2-stroke

  • #2
    Don't worry about cosmetics, that's easy.
    How mechanically apt are you mate, if you aren't, be prepared to learn quick.
    If it's been looked after, you are due a set of rings at those kays, if not (which is more likely) you are looking at a top end rebuild that will cost you c$500 in parts.
    Be careful of over rattly engines.
    If you can be arsed, and the buyer will let you (should do if you rock up with the cash), pull the fairings off, pull the front pipe off and have a look at how much gunk comes out.
    If it's heaps, it's not been looked after too well.
    This also gives you the chance to look into the port with a torch and check out the condition of the piston and rings.
    Whilst the fairing is off, check for any cracks in the engine cradle around the front engine mount points, caused by an over tightened chain.
    Other than that, just check what you would check on any bike.
    Oh yeah, brakes and suspension are spongy and crap on pretty much all bikes, this can be fixed so don't let it put you off.

    Comment


    • #3
      ^^ what he said.

      The mechanical thing isn't too bad, if you've never worked on engines before don't be put off too much - they're pretty simple machines, if you get a workshop manual and are willing to put in the effort you'll be fine.

      They're an old bike now so most of the "old bike" stuff applies (condition of chain, shocks, head stem bearings, etc) - but they're a fun little bike and worth the effort, if you have the $ to spend on maintaining it properly.

      You'll be very lucky to find one that hasn't been dropped, so i'd not be too put off with minor cosmetic damage.

      Oil film on forks = fork seals gone maybe, about 200 bucks ish to fix.

      As to riding it - let it warm up properly, then ride it hard. They don't like being lugged around and there is no power below 7000 rpm. The clutch is your friend...
      “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

      Comment


      • #4
        This completely rebuild Yamaha TZR250 is in this weeks Quoka, licensed till december 2009

        together with the KTM 540 enduro.
        So ..if some one wants a fun 2 stroker!

        Comment


        • #5
          meh

          dosen't matter anyway someone beast me to it. but ill keep the advice in mind when im looking at others

          Comment


          • #6
            How much are you asking for the TZR bert?

            Comment


            • #7
              Quoka price $4500

              Comment


              • #8
                Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm..........
                “The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is. - W Churchill”

                Comment


                • #9
                  i would whack a compression tester on it, compression test should be done at WOT and kicking hell out of it- not too sure what an RGV should blow.. somewhere between 120 and 130psi would be my guess and the two cylinders should be within a couple of psi of each other.

                  the thing thats always turned me off about rgv's is the cost of power valves and the mode of failure for worn power valves is to drop inside the running motor and nuke it.

                  the other thing about them is the nikasil cylinder sleeves. if they become scored from a siezure or worse, then they can be expensive to replace. the bikes are getting old as well- hence the requirement for compression testing. if they are down on compression it could just need new rings, or maybe the bore has been ruined from a past seizure.

                  if you can get a cheap one thats in running condition then there is no reason not to spend some money renewing it, they are good bikes.

                  for diy

                  $300 for fork rebuild with new springs
                  $300 for rear shock rebuild with new spring

                  $2000 if new barrels, pistons and crank rebuild are required
                  $1000 for power valves if they need replacing

                  another $200 for brake lines
                  another $1000-ish for nice tyga expansion chambers
                  another $1000-ish for tyga plastics

                  total rebuild price ~ $6000

                  imho an rgv that is running complete and original but at the end of its life is worth about $1500
                  Originally posted by Bendito
                  If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by g0zer View Post
                    i would whack a compression tester on it, compression test should be done at WOT and kicking hell out of it- not too sure what an RGV should blow.. somewhere between 120 and 130psi would be my guess and the two cylinders should be within a couple of psi of each other.

                    the thing thats always turned me off about rgv's is the cost of power valves and the mode of failure for worn power valves is to drop inside the running motor and nuke it.

                    the other thing about them is the nikasil cylinder sleeves. if they become scored from a siezure or worse, then they can be expensive to replace. the bikes are getting old as well- hence the requirement for compression testing. if they are down on compression it could just need new rings, or maybe the bore has been ruined from a past seizure.

                    if you can get a cheap one thats in running condition then there is no reason not to spend some money renewing it, they are good bikes.

                    for diy

                    $300 for fork rebuild with new springs * plus oils etc.
                    $300 for rear shock rebuild with new spring * plus regassing, revalving etc,etc!

                    $2000 if new barrels, pistons and crank rebuild are required * plus gasket set, and all sorts of incidentals!
                    $1000 for power valves if they need replacing

                    another $200 for brake lines *plus fluids etc.
                    another $1000-ish for nice tyga expansion chambers * plus cans, gaskets and postage for
                    another $1000-ish for tyga plastics

                    total rebuild price ~ $6000

                    imho an rgv that is running complete and original but at the end of its life is worth about $1500
                    Only if you want to go that way, staying standard with standard plastics and pipes etc is a much better$$ option and the bike will be easier to sell in standard form.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by g0zer View Post
                      the thing thats always turned me off about rgv's is the cost of power valves and the mode of failure for worn power valves is to drop inside the running motor and nuke it.

                      the other thing about them is the nikasil cylinder sleeves. if they become scored from a siezure or worse, then they can be expensive to replace. the bikes are getting old as well- hence the requirement for compression testing. if they are down on compression it could just need new rings, or maybe the bore has been ruined from a past seizure.

                      Yep, powervalves are a big ticket item. even with the current exchange rate, you're looking at around a grand for the cougar valves. There is a cheaper option in the form of the billet centre blades, but not much cheaper really.

                      I have to defend the nikasil barrels though. they mean that you don't have to have to have them resleeved or bored if they are in good nick, which they should be unless something drastic has gone wrong. you still can buy brand new barrels from suzuki if you want for around the $600AUD mark, which isn't that bad really and definitely cheaper second hand. also, being a V-twin, there is the possibility of only needing 1 new barrel.

                      I certainly wouldn't be looking at the nikasil lined bores as a disadvantage.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jamathi View Post
                        Only if you want to go that way, staying standard with standard plastics and pipes etc is a much better$$ option and the bike will be easier to sell in standard form.
                        Plastics maybe, but stock pipes are restrictive and heavy, I doubt you'd sell the bike quicker without aftermarket pipes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jamathi View Post
                          Only if you want to go that way, staying standard with standard plastics and pipes etc is a much better$$ option and the bike will be easier to sell in standard form.
                          i agree totally with keeping bikes original- just that from what ive seen of 2nd hand rgvs the plastics are usually trashed and the pipes dented in and scraped too.
                          Originally posted by Bendito
                          If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by WIGARUS View Post
                            Plastics maybe, but stock pipes are restrictive and heavy, I doubt you'd sell the bike quicker without aftermarket pipes.
                            Maybe , but,.. with after market pipes comes a complete rejet, or re carb plus a new design inlet filter house.
                            This is timely and expensive as going the wrong way will do serious damage and a new rebuild needed.
                            keeping it stock with a play arround in the jetting department keeping it on the right side of rich keeps the engine live happy for a long time.
                            riding it on the street in full bomb race mode with alll the peakyness that comes with it is NOT an easy and enjoyable ride! trying to keep one self alive and in licence!
                            Realism has to be considered.

                            Sorry to say; but, to think that someone knows more about a 2 stroke street bike than say Yamaha with all there expirience is in my way dreaming a wet dream!

                            The bike I am selling is stock with a detailed jetting done to it, it will do lotsa KM's without blowing up if you ride it sensible AND warm it up propperly before setting off screaming down the road!
                            once warmed up and all the tolerances are there it will be reliable due to the reserves that are build in because of the millions and decades spend by the R&D department of Yamaha.
                            Last edited by Jamathi; 24-08-2009, 03:04 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jamathi View Post
                              The bike I am selling is stock with a detailed jetting done to it, it will do lotsa KM's without blowing up if you ride it sensible AND warm it up propperly before setting off screaming down the road!
                              once warmed up and all the tolerances are there it will be reliable due to the reserves that are build in because of the millions and decades spend by the R&D department of Yamaha.
                              did you put a rebore and new pistons in those barrels jamathi?

                              this is what i like about steel sleeves, reboring is cheap and once rebored they are back to factory spec.

                              i am dubious about whether a nikasil sleeve that has done 50,000km is going to be as tight as original factory specification.
                              Originally posted by Bendito
                              If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

                              Comment

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