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MrMWTK-kite boarding

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  • MrMWTK-kite boarding

    Anyone here kite board?
    Every few months the idea pops in my head that I'd like to give it a go, I love snowboarding and use to skate heaps as a teenager and I believe I have pretty good balance and co-ordination.
    Was up Seabird over the weekend and was looking out over the sea thinkin how awesome it would be to be able to get out in such a great spot on a kite board.
    Would be lookin at buying 2nd hand gear initially is it worth getting proper lessons first or is it pretty easy to pick up with a bit of common sense?
    B19 Oakford V.B.F.S

  • #2
    Definitely worth learning the first few basics professionally - things like kite control, launching, getting up on the board and self recovery stuff. Once you're up and going lessons aren't as important.

    My brother runs/owns Perth Kitesurfing School. Good spot to learn down there at Woodies.

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    • #3
      [MENTION=25838]Asegai[/MENTION]
      interested in giving it a go myself but worried about picking up another expensive hobby

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      • #4
        I thought about doing the switch from windsurfing to kite boarding back in the late nineties ish, IMO a few lessons in kite theory and control definitely worthwhile and would cut the learning cycle quite a bit, I've heard of guys getting dragged down the beach and beyond. and you'll pickup some pointers on what sort of gear to buy to get you going so you don't buy someone else's unusable pro gear.

        i gave the idea away because it seemed just as expensive
        I cant help it if your perceptions don't match my reality


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        • #5
          Originally posted by =Stevo= View Post
          My brother runs/owns Perth Kitesurfing School. Good spot to learn down there at Woodies.
          Does he live in kallaroo?

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          • #6
            Lessons are a must. The sport is a high capital expense but there are no on going costs other than yearly WAKSA membership (get this for insurance). If you look after your gear it will last many years of use.
            Please contact the Administrator if your date of birth has changed.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by marras View Post
              Does he live in kallaroo?
              No, although one of the previous owners might have. (he only just took over the company)

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              • #8
                Everyone I know who's given it a go has gone back to windsurfing after a season - apparently good for a giggle and a bit of a challenge to learn, but then it gets boring as batshit.

                "teabagging", they call it.
                "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Captain Starfish View Post
                  Everyone I know who's given it a go has gone back to windsurfing after a season - apparently good for a giggle and a bit of a challenge to learn, but then it gets boring as batshit.

                  "teabagging", they call it.
                  "teabagging"

                  its a real shame windsurfing went the direction it did, the best quote i heard to sum it up was "in the beginning windsurfing was so easy and cheap that everybody could do it and in the end we made it so hard and expensive that no one could do it"

                  in its heyday apparently around 25% of homes in western Europe had a windsurfer, now? it'd be less than 1, I used to be an instructor and the cross section of people wanting to learn was huge, the books were always full
                  I cant help it if your perceptions don't match my reality


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                  • #10
                    I did a lot of windsurfing as a kid, whole family was into it. I gave it away when I started uni, a combination of getting sick of 4 rigs between 5 people and the resulting fights and, well, girls.

                    My sister went on to become a competitive wave sailor before some serious spinal issues put paid to that. My parents still sail regularly and I shudder when a new board appears because I know that's another big chunk of my inheritance gone.

                    My brother is insane, up there with the world's fastest sailors, rocking out 40+ knots with a weight jacket to hold down more sail, has his own board design in production and makes crazy good carbon fibre fins for sale.

                    I have occasionally tried to get back into it but quickly give up. Not at all like riding a bike, it would seem. Becoming an utter n00b, dropping every gybe and generally being too out of balance to even get the harness locked in means every sail is an exercise in exhaustion and frustration so I piss it off pretty quickly.
                    "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Captain Starfish View Post
                      Everyone I know who's given it a go has gone back to windsurfing after a season - apparently good for a giggle and a bit of a challenge to learn, but then it gets boring as batshit.

                      "teabagging", they call it.
                      I was more keen on it due to a board riding background, and I see this as a more regular and cheaper option that continual trips to the snow or buying a wake boat and gear.
                      B19 Oakford V.B.F.S

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                      • #12
                        Used to do it a fair bit up in Port Hedland, but haven't had much of a go in Perth yet.
                        Seems to be a fair few guys who get out on the river when the wind picks ups.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Captain Starfish View Post
                          I have occasionally tried to get back into it but quickly give up. Not at all like riding a bike, it would seem. Becoming an utter n00b, dropping every gybe and generally being too out of balance to even get the harness locked in means every sail is an exercise in exhaustion and frustration so I piss it off pretty quickly.
                          yeh, spot on. its just too fucking hard to jump back on at the level of gear you used to be at and i cant find a decent priced learner to intermediate transition board package ( or the time these days ) to get my base skills and fitness level back to a point i could get back in the waves, which is what i want to do, so i let it go

                          but the yearning to get back into it remains, for me teabagging **giggle** not an option
                          I cant help it if your perceptions don't match my reality


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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Heretic View Post
                            yeh, spot on. its just too fucking hard to jump back on at the level of gear you used to be at and i cant find a decent priced learner to intermediate transition board package ( or the time these days ) to get my base skills and fitness level back to a point i could get back in the waves, which is what i want to do, so i let it go

                            but the yearning to get back into it remains, for me teabagging **giggle** not an option
                            Or you step onto a hire <whatever passes for a Clubman now> and fall off after ten minutes because you're bored shitless.

                            The middle ground is hard to find as loan or hire gear, either you're back on a barge or on a borrowed sinker but that middle ground is hard to find without fully committing and buying the kit.
                            "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

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                            • #15
                              I ride at least 3 days a week this time a year. I've been kiting since 2010 and I ride wakestyle mostly at Woodies. If you have any specific questions feel free to ping me a PM. it's a great sport but not as safe as you might think. There has been 3 deaths and many serious injuries (some permanent) in the last 2 or 3 years in Australia. Quality lessons from a reputable school are a must. It'll reduce your learning curve drastically as well.

                              It's great fun. Budget $600 for lessons and another $1500 for good secondhand gear (one kite, board, bar, harness). It gets expensive though. I take on average one kite trip a year and have tons of gear.
                              EXPERIENCE: noun: Knowledge or skill derived from actual participation or direct contact rather than mere study, interest, or internet.

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