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  • Write Off's

    I've just become aware of the legal difference between a statutory write (not registerable) off and a repairable write off (registerable).
    I know you can't buy a repairable write off on HP but not much else.
    I guess this has been discussed here before so if anybody, in the know, would care to comment or link in relevant threads etc I would be grateful.
    The only thing wrong with a perfect ride to work is that you end up at work.
    G T

  • #2
    I don't understand what you're asking mate. You want to know how to register a repairable write off or are you wanting to know if there's any way of getting a loan to buy one?
    Click Link for My Bikes:

    Aprilia RS250
    1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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    • #3
      OK Loud I'm on a laptop now and a little less lazy with the keyboard...
      Yesterday I was in JCS's looking at a Rocket 3, it's secondhand and is classed as a repairable write due to previous damage. It looks OK, at a glance, the price is good, and I was told finance was not available because of it being a repairable write off. Finance is irrelevant because I will being paying cash for my next bike.
      What I want to know is what are the pluses and minuses of buying such a bike as opposed to one that has not been through the mill so to speak. Do these bikes have limltations to their warranty etc...
      What are the traps for "young" players?
      I'm not so young but do want to have a go on a Rocket 3 before I get too old to handle one, basically it will be up for sale as soon as I buy it. The first asking price will be just above the cost and will come down gradually until I let it go. I'll want to put 2 or 3 tyres on it at least, even more if I'm having fun on it.
      So there you have it, please tell.
      The only thing wrong with a perfect ride to work is that you end up at work.
      G T

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      • #4
        I reckon there are two pluses:

        1 Buyers (you and anyone you sell it to) can use the "WOVR" to screw the price down as far as you can.
        2 It means the bike had insurance at the time it was crashed so the owner was likely to have been taking care of it.
        3 Someone repaired it well enough to get it registered again.

        From there it's all speculative. Were there any corners cut in the repair? Is there paperwork to go along with the repairs and re-licensing? Etc.

        Basically just take the bike on its merit and get it for as little as you can. But really give it a good look over and take in to account all of the information and missing-information before you sign on the dotted line.
        Click Link for My Bikes:

        Aprilia RS250
        1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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        • #5
          What are the implications for insurance....surely any company would decline to insure it at all?
          Smoke me a kipper...I'll be home in time for breakfast

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          • #6
            Insurance shouldn't be a problem if its been repaired and inspected properly prior to licensing. Friend has one that is registered now, no issue.
            '13 YZF-R1 // '00 RZ Supra // '72 XA Fairmont Sedan (Resto Project)

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            • #7
              The previous insurance company de-registers the vehicle once it is entered on to the WOVR - which lists the type of damage involved.

              To get it re-licensed it needs to be thoroughly repaired and go through the formal re-inspection and licensing process. This involves photos and receipts for the parts used in the repair, I believe sometimes even the VIN of the vehicle the parts came from if they're second hand. They're trying to weed out inter-state rebirthing and dodgy repairs

              Once it is registered again then it should* be eligible for full insurance again.

              *I'd definitely check with your insurer first as I'm sure that some will have exceptions.

              Also if you decide to "streetfighter" a supersports to save on costs of repair then you'll have to declare the modifications and probably take a hit on the value they will insure it for - if they insure modified vehicles at all.

              The above post is all from prior experience and may have been superceded so don't come at me if things have changed
              Click Link for My Bikes:

              Aprilia RS250
              1985 GSXR750 "Slabbie"

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              • #8
                I'm currently riding a WOVR Daytona, no stress with insurance at all, like loud said , it gets inspected for everything that is in the insurance report as well as the use of photos of all damage prior to repairs.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the replies everyone, I've learned a fir bit I wouldn't have otherwise known. I doubt this bike will be still available when I'm ready to move but I do want to have a Rocket 3 but not as a keeper. I want to experience such a behemoth because I can...err because I think I still can. I'm close to retirement and motorcycle riding is high on the agenda.
                  As far as insurance goes I only do third party so there's no issues there, back in the 70's when the British Motorcycle industry was self destructing the insurance co's cancelled all Brit bike insurance beause of the high rate of theft at the time, I've been "self insured" since and am now ahead of the 8 Ball. I don't want to lose one but I can afford to.
                  The only thing wrong with a perfect ride to work is that you end up at work.
                  G T

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