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TWTK - Big bikes limited or 250cc restriction?

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  • TWTK - Big bikes limited or 250cc restriction?

    I was talking to a German student at Curtin yesterday, and he was saying that in Germany rather than being forced to ride a 250cc bike, you could just go and buy a bigger bike and a power limiter was applied to the bike, limiting it to 37 hp or something like that (about 27kW). After your "limited licence" period expired you could get the restriction removed. It got me thinking about the advantages and disadvantages of each approach:

    250cc bike, then big bike:
    Pros: 250cc bikes are lighter and cost less to service. They're easier to maneuver and you don't feel as bad about crashing them. They're very efficient in fuel.
    Cons: They're 250's. Once you're out of your R-E's you probably won't use them again. They sound like lawn mowers.

    Big bike limited, then unlimited:
    Pros: You only have to buy one bike. They look better. You get to learn on the bike you'll most likely be riding for a while. Bigger bikes often have more technology put into them, for example EFI. I'm yet to see a 250 fitted with ABS. There's a wider range of big bikes from different makes.
    Cons: if you crash it, you feel really bad about it. They're more expensive to service, and as a novice rider you're more likely to damage a big heavy bike than a smaller lighter 250. Some people would remove the restrictions themselves. Fixed horsepower restriction, but weight is variable - litrebikes would be at the disadvantage compared to smaller bikes that weighed less. Some people say that having a small bike to learn on makes it more enjoyable than just going straight to a big bike too.

    So basically, each one has its own pro's and con's. I'm wondering what you would have preferred - your big bike straight up, limited, or a small bike limited to 250cc then your bigger bike?

    The mental image of a Hayabusa, Gixxer or ZX-12R limited to 37hp makes me laugh and cringe at the same time too.
    Dual sport riders do it in the dirt

  • #2
    Originally posted by Tenchi View Post
    I was talking to a German student at Curtin yesterday, and he was saying that in Germany rather than being forced to ride a 250cc bike, you could just go and buy a bigger bike and a power limiter was applied to the bike, limiting it to 37 hp or something like that (about 27kW). After your "limited licence" period expired you could get the restriction removed. It got me thinking about the advantages and disadvantages of each approach:
    Lol yeah spoken to another german about this

    guess whats the first thing they do when they get said restricted bike...

    silly and unworkable ^_^

    Comment


    • #3
      LAMS, They have it over east. Restricted to 35Hp

      You have to take in your license to get it derestricted (if you do not have the tech know how)

      Edit:

      I am going to assume that they have a list of approved bikes that they can choose from, same as over here. It would not be feasible to mess with all the available bikes and get them to run correctly

      Comment


      • #4
        Don't forget gearing plays a huge role. I'd love to see a litre bike that is geared for 150+ km/h in first try to operate with only 37hp.
        For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
        For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

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        • #5
          Tis the same in the UK.

          Just think tho, 1000cc bike, 250odd kg plus fuel, 37hp.


          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, that's what makes me laugh... wide ratios... 250cc powah... ouch. It'd never get out of 1st.
            Dual sport riders do it in the dirt

            Comment


            • #7
              Hyo 650 available in the East, comes restricted, get it de-restricted later, makes sense rather than having to buy 2 bikes

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Stoneville View Post
                Hyo 650 available in the East, comes restricted, get it de-restricted later, makes sense rather than having to buy 2 bikes
                list of LAMS approved MC's
                Approved motorcycles for novice riders

                Comment


                • #9
                  Eligible Motorcycles in the category 0-260ml. All models with the exception of: Suzuki RGV250 Kawasaki KR250 (KR-1 and KR1s models) Honda NSR250 Yamaha TZR250 Aprila RS250
                  BOO!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shane1 View Post
                    Eligible Motorcycles in the category 0-260ml. All models with the exception of: Suzuki RGV250 Kawasaki KR250 (KR-1 and KR1s models) Honda NSR250 Yamaha TZR250 Aprila RS250
                    BOO!!!
                    power/weight ratio's apply

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Other than that i would say its better.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by barfridge View Post
                        Don't forget gearing plays a huge role. I'd love to see a litre bike that is geared for 150+ km/h in first try to operate with only 37hp.

                        Wouldnt be too bad.. i'd be surprised if my 600rr is making 37hp at say 7000rpm... which is 130-135km/h in top (it can do 115 in first).


                        Riding it around "normally" day to day i'm probably using less than 40hp 90% of the time.
                        “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think in terms of acceleration you'd find they'd lose out a little, but other than that it's ok. It'd be a nice, even pull once it got to that 37hp which would be nice, and it's likely the pull would go through most of the rev range too, unlike a 250 where you usually have to rev it up half way through the rev range before you get anything at all.
                          Dual sport riders do it in the dirt

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Put it another way....

                            My 600rr makes near on 120hp at something like 14,000rpm.

                            That's 100% throttle at 14,000.

                            40hp restriction (assuming it's via an inlet air restrictor that just caps airflow) would roughly be equal to say, 1/3 throttle at 14,000 or ~100% throttle at 5000-6000.


                            Either way, that's still pretty damn quick compared to a 250 -in normal street use (ie, not being an idiot) i'm rarely turning the grip more than 20-30%..
                            “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yep the same in the UK, you have a choice of 2 different tests though if your over 21, if your under 21 you can only do a restricted (33 bhp) licence, and be restricted for 2 years, if your over 21, you can do the restricted, or "direct access", which is exactly the same test as the other but training and test are done on a bigger bike e.g. 400-500cc, and when you pass you can ride what ya like unrestricted . I done the direct access at 21, piece of piss

                              As for the "restricted" bikes, you can have whatever you like (or what you can insure, remember no insurance = no ride, over there ), Be it a VFR 400 to a Busa, aslong as you have the T.U.V stamped certificate, saying there is a restrictor kit fitted to the bike, the kits were normally around £150 ish to supply and fit, but could be supplied for nearly any bike!. My dad's R6 "allegedly" had one fitted as he done a resticted licence, he even had the certificate supplied by the dealer, but funnilly enough it went the same as a stock one, well it did when I rode it

                              There was a magazine article I read once a while ago in the UK, where they tested a stock Busa, to a restricted (33bhp) Busa, surprisingly, upto around 100 mph (160 kph), there wasn't much difference in the way the bikes rode, apart from obviously, the restricted run out of breathe at a ton, and the stock went onto warp speed 10, but acceleration wasn't affected as much as you might think, probably due to it being played with mechanicaly, I will see if I can find the article for ya all!
                              Designed by a Genius.
                              Built by Craftsmen.
                              Ridden by a TWAT!

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