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  • Dual citizenship

    So, I just got back from Europe.
    I am planning to do a huge bike trip within the next 5-10 years. All depends on if/when I get made redundant. But I like to prepare for things. Just in case.
    A European passport would make my life much easier when the trip comes around.

    So for any Italians out there-
    My nono (grandfather) and nona (grandmother) from my father's side were Italian citizens that moved here after WW2 in 1952.
    My father was born in 1954. My grandparents became naturalized Australian citizens two years later in 1956.
    So, at the time of my fathers birth (In Australia) my grandparents were still Italian citizens. So that means that, technically, my father was an Italian/Australian dual citizen at the time of his birth (as his parents were still Italian citizens living in Australia). As he was born here, he got Australian citizenship by default, and then, like I said, two years later my grandparents became citizens.
    My father has never revoked his entitlement to Italian citizenship (as in, he has never been naturalized as an Australian as there was no need- he was born here. He automatically became Australian at birth on australian soil). Which in turn means that I, too, could be regarded as an Italian citizen also as I have never renounced my right to hold an Italian citizenship.
    Does that sound right? I've been doing some research on different consulate sites etc and apparently all should be good (provided I can find the 90 year old birth certificate of my grandfather).

    I will be giving the Italian consulate here in Perth a call on Monday/Tuesday to go over everything.... but is there any way in which I wouldn't be entitled to hold dual citizenship ??? I'm just putting this out into the PSB collective to see if anyone here has some insights/have been through it.

    All help appreciated

  • #2
    Pretty sure your parents have to have lived there/have a passport to get one yourself, at least in the UK

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    • #3
      From what I've read about Italian citizenship, as long as you can prove that your father/ their father/ their father etc etc etc were italian citizens at the time of each child's birth, then the right passes on forever, until the citizenship is renounced formally (through naturalization).
      UK is different. My brother in law is from the UK and I was speaking with him earlier. He pretty much said it's difficult. But like I said, for an Italian passport/citizenship it's different...

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      • #4
        I have dual US Australian citizenship because I was born there, I left at one year old. I got dual citizenship for my kids based on the fact that one parent and two dead grandparents were Americans. It had to be processed before they turned 18, other than that they needed to live there for quite a few years before the age of 14. Many other countries have the same requirements. Do it.
        Last edited by agrid; 09-11-2013, 09:13 PM.
        -

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        • #5
          If Italian citizenship works the same as UK citizenship (which as EU states I believe they do) then you don't give up european citizenship when naturalised as an Aussie.

          Our daughter was born here so has dual citizenship, her kids will not automatically get dual citizenship unless she moves to the UK and they are born there.
          Not my circus, not my monkeys

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rorschach View Post
            Pretty sure your parents have to have lived there/have a passport to get one yourself, at least in the UK
            Not entirely true, you used to be entitled to British citizenship if one of your grand parents was British or if your parent held a British passport but this was removed within the last 10 years. Now you are only entitled to citizenship if your parent was a citizen born in the UK; my grandkids will not necessarily be entitled to a UK passport, whether my daughter has a UK passport or not.
            Not my circus, not my monkeys

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SH00TA View Post
              If Italian citizenship works the same as UK citizenship (which as EU states I believe they do) then you don't give up european citizenship when naturalised as an Aussie.

              Our daughter was born here so has dual citizenship, her kids will not automatically get dual citizenship unless she moves to the UK and they are born there.
              Just because its called EU, it doesn't mean that all EU countries are the same. In Germany for example, are very few instances where you can have dual citizenship...
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              • #8
                Interesting, I thought that was one of the first things they standardised across the EU so that you wouldn't be able to get in through the "back door" of a soft country
                Not my circus, not my monkeys

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                • #9
                  I'm a dual citizen with Italia, I'll double check the requirements but I think you qualify too. They may have changed things in the past 4 or 5 years though.
                  :stupid:

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wedge View Post
                    I'm a dual citizen with Italia, I'll double check the requirements but I think you qualify too. They may have changed things in the past 4 or 5 years though.
                    That would be great if you could check!

                    I've been talking with the old man. We tend to think finding my nonno's birth certificate and marriage certificate will be the problem. But I'm gonna give it a try...

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                    • #11
                      I'm looking at this too (Australia and UK) for myself.

                      This is one of those situations where you need to pick up the phone and get a 100% correct answer to your own specific circumstances from the appropriate Italian immigration office, rather than asking people on the internet.

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                      • #12
                        I am dual Italian and Australian. My parents were born in Italy and came here when they were two. What I needed to get my citizenship was my grandparents marriage cert, Naturalisation papers and also my parents marriage certificate. It is quite a process and you need to go into the consulate for an interview.. However I think there was a cut off date in the mid 90's where anyone who wanted to register their child to become dual citizen had to go through the process then. Not sure if it can still be done.

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                        • #13
                          Both my sisters have got UK permanent residency visas from a grandmother who was born in England but immigrated to SA with her family when she was under 5 years old.

                          Maybe instead of dual citizenship you just need permanent residency to make your trip easier?

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                          • #14
                            One of my cousins tried to get a British passport due to grandad being from Ireland.

                            Cheeky bastard didn't marry grandma so no go.
                            They hung a sign up in our town "If you live it up, you won't live it down"-Tom Waits

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                            • #15
                              It is a process, but I got mine only around 4-5 years ago. The hardest part (and it does take time) is getting the original documents from Italy. It took my family about 6 months to get all the documentation required, with numerous trips to the consulate and long phone calls to Italy.

                              I've had a trawl through my emails but can't find the requirements and steps we took. I'll ask my family and get back to you.
                              :stupid:

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