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  • Need info on Road Bikes (Bicycles)

    Hi All.. So I'm chasing a road bike to get me to the gym & back in the mornings - roughly a 2.5km ride.. I think I'll prob enjoy the riding/cardio part of it so may take a longer route eventually.. Can also see myself training it to Burswood and riding around the river some weekends.

    So have done the gumtree search and have absolutely no idea what I should be looking for and what to stay away from. Have looked at the Reid Condor (Buy Reid Condor Road Bike) which seems ok for $269. Any thoughts on this?

    Also, if you have anything you want to get rid of that would suit my needs, please pm or post up. Looking to spend between $150-$300. Not really interested in anything 'vintage' as i just read that as needing work soon.

    Last questions - can you put child carriers on the back of road bikes? Just unsure since they're usually lighter (weaker?) than mountain bikes.

  • #2
    For what they are, those Reid bicycles aren't too bad value. They aren't a bike that a serious cyclist would prefer but for just punting to the gym and back, they will be fine.

    They have shimano derailleurs which are reputable. The quando hubs are the hyosung of the bicycle hub world, they work just fine but they might not be as quiet or refined as a more expensive unit.

    It will be fine for runs around the river too. I would get the drop bars though rather than flat bars if you're going to be doing longer runs.
    #109

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    • #3
      For commuting, cardio and recreation riding on roads and bike paths how about the "flat bar road bikes", you'll get the road bike lightness and ride and speed from the wheel sets as well as a comfier mountain bike position. Consider one with a triple front chainring also if your around hills. Alternatively you could get a mountain bike and put slicks on it. I would go away from anything with suspension front or both. If you can stretch the budget a little something like a Giant's ride will blow you away. IMO I think the Reid looks good value but would ride a bit agricultural.

      If you buy a new bike always ask them to fit you up for size on a new frame,having a bike that fits you right will be comfortable and efficient and you will want to use it, which is the key to regular riding. Having racing bars or "drops" on a recreation bike I think is a bit of a waste as most times they are set too low, uncomfortable and they can't be used properly, if at all and you end up on the flats or hoods any ways.

      most lower end road bikes have carrier lugs, flat bars and mountain bikes would have them also as they are made for everyday use.
      I cant help it if your perceptions don't match my reality


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      • #4
        In that price bracket I would go with a decent second hand bike from somebody who had the same idea and put around 100 km on a new bike only to park it in the shed for 2 years. MTB or road or normal commuter bike will profit from thin tyres with a continues middle pumped up to the max will have you rolling along nicely. I never liked drop downs because you canĀ“t manipulate vital controls (brakes) while leisurely cruising along sitting up, hands rested on the flat tops. I had flat bars before it was even a thing and it is awesome. Make sure to look into ergonomics of a bike and adjust accordingly (seat hight mostly, others will help out too). You make it so hard on you if you are not taking advantage of adjustment possibilities. Legs must be fully straight when having your foot parallel to the floor and on the bottom of the stroke while trying. When pedalling your bum must not need to go down left and right in order to be able to "reach" the pedal on the bottom. If you are sitting like on a toilet with knees bend a lot in either point of the rotation you are doing it wrong. The worst 1900 bike will feel better than the most modern time trial machine if correctly adjusted vs not. So correct size does matter

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        • #5
          Thanks guys, seems to be a few votes for flat bars. I'd only thought about this shortly and always thought the drop bars would be better. Not sure why - I think it's cos that's all you really see everyone using.

          Will try and get out there this weekend and try both though - see what feels better.

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          • #6
            Go with the Reid bike. A colleague got one & it's fantastic value, plus, unlike Big W bikes, they are standard so you can swap over parts easily.
            The correct number of bikes to own = N + 1, where N is the current number of bikes you own.

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            • #7
              With sizing:

              Saddle height should let you almost fully extend your leg without dropping hips.
              Frame length should allow you to hold the grips loosely with arms loosely bent on a flat bar bike, aim for sport tourer bike posture.
              Bar width should be about shoulder width & you should be able to rotate the bars a little to maximise comfort, it takes a while to get the best fit.
              The correct number of bikes to own = N + 1, where N is the current number of bikes you own.

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              • #8
                Can you stretch to this
                Buy Reid Falco Elite Road Bike

                and with the Mavic wheels you've got a pretty good piece of kit....

                My friends all bought cheap bikes and ended up finding out you get what you pay for, and upgraded.

                Child carriers? For a road bike maybe the one that attaches in front of you, behind the bars. Or get a mountain bike.

                If your near doubleview, Gary at Blazing Saddles is a top bloke with good advice.

                The suggestion to buy a better bike second hand is worth looking at, too. :-)

                road bike in Perth Region, WA | Sport & Fitness | Gumtree Australia Free Local Classifieds | Page 1
                Last edited by peter600; 27-12-2013, 01:28 PM.
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Blue_Dot

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                • #9
                  Hey [MENTION=15794]peter600[/MENTION], whilst I'm usually the type to go overboard and splurge on every new hubby (just ask Mrs. Manyak) I need to limit myself on this one until I'm commuted an know it's not just a 'phase' like that time I tried golf or photography or bodyboarding or snorkelling etc etc

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Manyak View Post
                    Thanks guys, seems to be a few votes for flat bars. I'd only thought about this shortly and always thought the drop bars would be better. Not sure why - I think it's cos that's all you really see everyone using.

                    Will try and get out there this weekend and try both though - see what feels better.
                    It's probably like buying a sports bike and full leathers when you mostly do river runs and learner rides I have drops on one of my bikes, but I never stay down on them for long. Flat bars will be good for most riding

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                    • #11
                      I find my Kona Five-0 with road tyres on a spare set of wheels keeps me happy on almost any terrain.
                      The correct number of bikes to own = N + 1, where N is the current number of bikes you own.

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                      • #12
                        Ok am having a look at gumtree again as first time I was only looking at bikes with drop bars.

                        Will see what's out there and post some potentials in here to see what you guys think.

                        Thanks for the help so far

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                        • #13
                          I've got a drop bar road bike you can borrow for a couple of weeks if you want? It is a 57 cm frame though so may not suit for you, it depends on your height; I'm 182 cm and it's a good fit for me.
                          Anyway drop me a PM if you're interested; It'd be a good way for you to see if drop bars and road frame are what your after.

                          Cheers,

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                          • #14
                            or
                            http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...5/#post2990628
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Blue_Dot

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                            • #15
                              Forgot to add, since I also wanted to go fast using a straight bar I had a triathlon thing on there.



                              Way more comfortable than drop downs I find. Once you got them, you are gonna use them all the time I bet.

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