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Buying a few acres, living in a shed and having a few mates over... Wise heads needed

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  • Shady7/8
    replied
    Originally posted by ReCon View Post
    The shed is spot on with the style thanks Stoney (&#128522 , however we are , right now, chasing a south west sojourn.

    The property, price and location does look very attractive though. Have considered Beverly before, but the family want to head to south at present . Plans can change though...
    Thanks very much for the reference though. You have added yet another factor to consider for our new life.( a surprise bun in the oven has nearly finished baking, which ads to the planning complications and considerations!)
    There will be a brewery/distillery out here soon enough though!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hillz
    replied
    Originally posted by Water pig View Post
    my friend had a small track on his property 12.5 acres, he used it only on weekends, one of the the neighbors complained (was not in the next block) long story short , he wasn't allowed to keep the track, tried to call it a fire break no dice. The law only allows for the unrestricted use for land over 100 acres without special provisions on the use. This lesson cost him mega bucks in lawyers fees and court costs. Check the laws before you go ahead
    its doesn't matter how many acres if someone complains your fucked, complainers have more rights than just about anyone is australia, its a stupid system

    we had 120 acre farm in clackline with a MX track on it (near northam) guy next door complained, he didn't even live there & after many meetings with the shire & this dude never even turning up they still shut us down. apparently on rural zoned properties you can not make any noise what so ever unless its farm machinery

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  • INTJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Green Trident View Post
    Only you know what you want if it's remoteness then the further you go the cheaper and less productive is the land. This also improves your chances of getting licensed firearms.
    Yeah I'd like firearms when I'm back from USA. Especially if on acreage or remote where I'd need to be my own police.

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  • Green Trident
    replied
    Originally posted by INTJ View Post
    Most excellent thread. Wife and I are seeking a more remote existence and I'm thinking around 50 acre minimum.
    Only you know what you want if it's remoteness then the further you go the cheaper and less productive is the land. This also improves your chances of getting licensed firearms.

    Leave a comment:


  • INTJ
    replied
    Most excellent thread. Wife and I are seeking a more remote existence and I'm thinking around 50 acre minimum.

    Leave a comment:


  • ritza
    replied
    if anyone is wanting a complete ready to move in, my mate is selling 40 hectes in gigiganup with year round water....oh it planted with olives (EVOO gold medal winner) and limes

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  • clobber
    replied
    I bought a 6 acre block and built and designed my own house. (465m2) The only thing I wasn't allowed to do myself was the pre-plumbing. Everything else was self certified????? Shire came out one day and tried to shove a star picket through the bottom of my septic tank and left again. I designed the outside "look" I wanted and did the floor plan. I took the plan to a mob in Maddington that did steel framing. I paid them to do all the engineering and the plans to submit to council. I am no bricky so I decided to go steel frame and a product called Linea board. It's a fribro cement product from NZ. Used it to clad the outside of the frame. The frame arrived in sections and the plan was like a huge mechano set. I was able to dig the formwork myself and meshed it myself. I organised the concrete myself and got in a team of grano workers I paid cash to lay the slab. Whole house cost $120,000 to build and that was in 2007. I am no builder but was a assault pioneer for 10 years so picked up knowledge along the way. Good news is the money you save you get to buy a shit load of good tools.

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  • Green Trident
    replied
    /\ Grashopper....

    Hmmm I too have been getting those urges to get a bigger block than residential. I used to have 5-50 acre rule of thumb but am now reconsidering a smaller stepping stone block closer to Perth before another step out yonder. The current criteria for me are soil type and water related issues. In my mind the true value of land is in its productive capacity.
    Home raised and killed meat is so good from chickens to four legged yummies.

    Leave a comment:


  • ReCon
    replied
    Holy thread revival Batman!

    As a sign of respect to the group and to acknowledge that I have, in fact, been on the job for a while now. It's time for an update.

    Have driven the South West from Augusta, Margs, Balingup, Boyup Brook, Boyanup, Bridgey, Preston Beach and Binningup.

    Quite a number of nice blocks, but after taking advice from a few posters, the cost to instal power to the shed is quite a bit to budget for.

    The main drama HOWEVER, is the almost complete lack of assistance or advice from many of the Shires.
    Budgeting with my limited knowledge has found that it is a bloody expensive excercise still, even with the steep dive in many of the smaller southwest towns. As my building knowledge is next to nil, explaining air contacting the right people is quite a battle.

    Have gone down the 'shed' style, tilt panel , Limestone blocks and even brick styles of build.

    Brick does end up easier and seems to get more of a positive response from Council planners, however prices for ALL builds are not as cost effective as previously hoped. ( especially in the more outside areas from the main towns)

    ATM it seems that buying a block and keeping the house to either live in or renting to go cash flow positive is a better financial decision right now, even with the prices in our area going south like a coal miner on speed.

    Hopefully I can do a better job applying better practice in designing water, sewerage and power systems to save funds, but the actual build keeps on hitting brick walls. ( pun intended)

    ALSO, how do I borrow to buy the block WITHOUT using our current house as security? ( ie using our savings as 80% LVR?)

    So far the banks have been evasive at best...

    Cheers yet again for any advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frogger
    replied
    i sell tools for a living and i live in gero so i deal with alot of people living far inland and of grid. my advise is only buy honda generators and make sure u service them. lock your bikes and guns up as up here its become a high target as people get careless and leave keys in quads and such.

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidf
    replied
    Tip on fire breaks if you're on acreage.

    Approach the local volunteer Fire brigade. Back in the day ours used to plough up the firebreak in return for a little training room on a paddock. They would teach the guys correct size/location of the firebreak and do a few little burns and put them out with the various units to practice pump skills.

    Win all round.

    Leave a comment:


  • xrsism
    replied
    Nice idea Recon. My family and I are going to do the same however just a bit more acres for a business we are planning. I come from a farming background and my folks have about 40acres in Denmark.

    Something to consider is containing your vegetation. In Denmark now as part of the council bushfire plan all paddock grasses must be less than 100mm tall. Yep no joke. So that either means buying livestock and the associated costs or having a tractor and slasher or at least a big ride-on mower and you may have to have all three depending on the block type and usage.

    Plus side of livestock is you can sell them (sheep are doing really well @ the moment) or you get a steady source of your own meat (however will need your own coolroom or know someone who does). Firebreaks also need doing yearly or more. Not expensive to hire a contractor but again added costs.

    Not sure if this is the case in other councils.

    Leave a comment:


  • shifted
    replied
    Will be interested to know the detailing to achieve the thermal and acoustic aspects of a build like this.

    I'd imagine you'd have a weatherproof membrane (such as one by Hardie) all around the perimeter, along with suitable insulation to meet BCA/efficiency criteria and a gyprock internal lining? No fire requirements for the walls for something like this?

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidf
    replied
    I'm more for buying an existing property with an established house [however humble] with power/water/phone etc, then build the shed.
    We built then lived in a largish shed while trying to establish the flower business, and built the house later. Looking back it wasn't fun. Seemed romantic but the reality was far different. Cold in winter, hot in summer, really crap for any socializing [ visitors and outside dunnys.... ] Getting power is EXPENSIVE to do, and living off-grid is do-able/admirable, until you try to sell it

    It's far easier/cheaper to tidy up an older small home to make it comfortable/welcoming, than splurge on a shed only to repeat it again if/when you build the house.
    My view is keep the house small/simple and to spend to make your dream shed/garage/party venue. Big sheds aren't cheap either......

    Try and find the property where someone has already given it a crack and given up [treechangers or hobby farm] , or an older "just out of town" listing down south somewhere with the basics already there, you will save a shit ton of money/grief in the long run. Real estate pretty flat at the moment, now is the time to buy.

    Leave a comment:


  • ReCon
    replied
    }^^^ Again, just invaluable information and duly noted!

    Shed plan is/was rectangular and aspect would have been ok. The warming of the slab in Winter sun and the window allowance for zoning info is 👍

    We are still learning this passive solar thing , especially with high drain battery efficiency atm. Having a genny for 3phase is gold though. Mobility and price.

    Will cost power v solar once we find the right block. ( PSH per day, ect.)

    Hopefully we can resurrect the PSB gatherings again for a those of us that were either too ill at the time, or were not members at that time, once we are moved and stable.

    Just hope it doesn't take so long that I will need to make allowances for walking frame access... 😛

    Leave a comment:

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