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  • Qos 802.11e

    Has anyone had problems using the QoS scheduler on their wireless router?
    I recently enabled this setting to see if it fixes up slowness problems with 3x PC's sharing the net over a wireless access point, and get constantly kicked off the wireless network (need to reconnect) with QoS enabled on the wireless access point.

    All 3 PC's do have a QoS Packet Scheduler installed under the network adapter properties.

    Any ideas?
    Last edited by Jonchilds; 31-10-2007, 09:39 PM.

  • #2
    what router? if it's a cisco, post your config, and i'll fix it for you.
    "In all the human societies we have ever reviewed, in every age and in every state, there has seldom if ever been a shortage of eager young males prepared to kill and die to preserve the security, comfort and prejudices of their elders, and what you call heroism is just an expression of this fact; there is never a scarcity of idiots." -The Culture

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    • #3
      Yep, can't really say much unless i know what kinda router it is. As a general rule, on most consumer grade equipment, leave advanced features like QoS the fuck alone. It will only cause you grief.

      If you're losing wireless connectivity, more than likely you've got an interference problem. You may have a neighbour who has a wireless device which is messing with your shit (and i don't mean intentionally, there's only so much wireless bandwidth available).
      Originally posted by zobo
      I'd be more prolific in answering but I thought of a use for the othe

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      • #4
        The windows qos driver is a POS... I would suggest disabling it.

        What problem were you trying to solve with it ?

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        • #5
          Yeah this "kicking off" effect will not be caused by too much traffic...

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          • #6
            It's a Belkin "Wireless G Router" (That's the belkin product name).

            When my brother hammers the connection with torrents, no other computers can access the internet beyond MSN. Pages time out with IE6/7.
            I'm hoping to be able to atleast surf the net a bit better - basically being able to share the bandwidth between computers when one is using heaps.

            There are no other networks I can see that would cause connectivity issues. Nice strong signal at all computers (WAP is in the roof space).
            Wireless connection only drops out when the QoS setting is enabled on the router/access point.

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            • #7
              Yeah, this is what's known as a "feature" of wireless networking. You've essentially got a 54Kbps hub (possibly 108). If someone's hogging the bandwidth, everyone suffers. Enabling QoS will only increase the processing load on your network devices in this case because your problem is a common collision space.

              i can't think of an easy solution off the top of my head. If you can restrict the heavy use PC to 802.11a and put the others on g maybe? Even then it depends on the internals of the device.

              Unless you turn on the microwave, in which case 802.11a is fscked and you can do whatever you like
              Originally posted by zobo
              I'd be more prolific in answering but I thought of a use for the othe

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              • #8
                Heres a solution Jon, of which I cannot explain why right now.

                Essentially if you upload is maxed (or nearly maxed) out, expect things to behave in the manner you describe. Instruct your brother to limit the upload speed on his torrent program to 70% of your max upload speed (say 70kb/s assuming 1mbit upload).

                Watch everything play nicely now

                The easy solution here is to instruct everyone to play nicely with their uploads (shouldnt be too hard, only three of you). Only seed torrents at night etc. REAL QOS solutions will be somewhat complex

                EDIT: Im struggling to remember why this is the case, learnt it at uni. Is it because when the upload stream is flooded thusly using regular PPPoE and TCP, there arent enough sockets to open new connections? something like that. Investigation is required...
                Last edited by Pkunk; 31-10-2007, 11:17 PM.

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                • #9
                  ^^ what pkunk said.

                  also, as implied in this thread, QoS on home connections is pretty much a waste of time.

                  TCP, being stateful/robust, requires ACKs to be sent back for a connection to be maintained (if sender does not receive an ack packet within the timeout, it re-sends). If your backchannel is flooded to all fuck, this will be slowed down/impossible and the transmission will stall


                  edit:
                  That won't cause re-association/wireless complete drop out tho...
                  Last edited by thro; 01-11-2007, 06:36 AM.
                  “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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                  • #10
                    Upstream vs downstream....

                    Every download requires acknowledgements and back-flow of traffic. If your upstream is saturated, it doesnt matter if the downstream is mostly unused... none of the acknowledgements are going to get out and back to the websites you are trying to visit, so they "timeout" and stop trying to send you data.

                    Its just the way TCP works... it relies on the sender receiving confirmation(Acks) that the receiver has got the packets that the sender sent. (Got it?? )

                    Having a maxxed out upstream is far worse for connectivity than having a maxxed out downstream. Oh and as the others said... QoS on consumer products sucks balls.
                    If you can... you MUST!

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I understand that uploads shouldn't be maxxed out, and I've told him to limit them to 3-4k/s (256/64 connection). He's thick in the head (seriously) and keeps disabling it. He also runs 10x torrents at once (I've told him to do 2x and limit their individual uploads to 1-2k/s each).

                      I've even told him to schedule downloads for midnight-7am (offpeak) and we keep getting shaped during peak periods after 15 days or so.

                      Trying to have a 'non-human' intervention where non-torrent traffic can get through.

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                      • #12
                        Honestly training him like a naughty puppy will be easier...

                        Bring on the negative reinforcement!

                        Also try rubbing his nose in pee if he downloads too much

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                        • #13
                          I suggest blocking his torrent ports on the router during times you want to use the net. Doesnt sound like he's being very respectful or reasonable about "sharing"
                          If you can... you MUST!

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                          • #14
                            Heh, you wouldn't believe 95% of the computer gear he's using is mine either.
                            He's only paid for the wireless card and $10/month for the net.

                            I've set up port forwarding on the router to a different (unoccupied) IP for the utorrent/limewire ports for now.

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                            • #15
                              just throttle him.

                              and no, i don't mean via configuration, i mean via hands around throat...
                              “Crashing is shit for you, shit for the bike, shit for the mechanics and shit for the set-up,” Checa told me a while back. “It’s a signal that you are heading in the wrong direction. You want to win but crashing is the opposite. It’s like being in France when you want to go to England and when you crash you go to Spain. That way you’ll never get to England!” -- Carlos Checa

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