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Canon 1Ds in bits - no 56k or technically squeamish...

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  • Canon 1Ds in bits - no 56k or technically squeamish...

    Here because it's not bike mods. But it involves tool time, which is always worth sharing

    I was aligning strobes during a shoot last weekend when I heard this quiet little clunk, looked up and saw my 1ds MkII with a 24-70 2.8L toppling off the tripod. Huge lunge and catch, saved my baby. Looking underneath, the tripod mount socket had been stripped by the previous owner and I'd not noticed it.

    Time for drastic action.

    A trip to Hartlands, our local repair shop, revealed that the mount socket was (as far as Canon is concerned, anyway) part of the battery tray and I'd be handing over $130 for just the part. Nah, I don't think so. I took the details as a back up in case my plan resulted in totally destroyed battery tray, then came home.

    So here's my baby...


    My plan? To remove the mounting nut from the camera, drill it out and press fit a sleeve with a new thread. Not for the techno faint hearted.

    Here's the step by step.

    WARNING - unsteady hands may cause serious damage to your camera. This helps a lot.


    WARNING - never attempt this kind of work without proper supervision

    or tools


    Step 1 - remove battery and cards.

    Step 2 - remove the rubber grip from the base and the little bit above the dial. The rubber is held in place by a gummy double sided tape, if everything is super clean (especially your hands) you probably won't need to replace it.


    Step 3 - start removing screws. NOTE the colour and the length of the screw in each position, they are different.

    9 screws from the base


    Peel back the rubber from the RHS (facing the back of the camera) and remove the two screws next to the join.


    Same on the left.


    On the back of the case are two screws, one above the dial, the other down the bottom (top one shown only here)


    Step 4 - Remove the baseplate - it may need prying off to get a little double sided tape to let go...


    Step 5 - Gently, from the opening into the battery case, prize the back off the camera. DO NOT pull it too far, there's a ribbon cable joining the two. This is the scary bit, it should require no force.


    Step 6 - At the base you should see the tripod socket is held in by 5 screws, which need removing. You will need to flex the metal plate a little to get at some of them.


    Step 7 - Now pop the tripod mount out. Curse you, improper prior owner and cheesy cheap metal!


    Step 8 - place the back of the camera back in position for now, to keep dust and nastiness out of the camera's innards.

    Step 9 - This is where the fun starts. Make the tripod socket betterer.

    Measuring up


    Ready to drill out the old core (no pedo)


    Swarf from a VERY easy drilling - the plate must be made of cheese!!


    Gutless plate


    Lump of black iron in the lathe, ready to go


    Faced


    Drilling out the centre ready to be tapped


    Now just a matter of turning it down to just larger than the hole in the original plate. AAAAARGH - 0.05mm too far, sliding fit, start over!


    Attempt 2 faced, drilled and starting to turn down


    Before we get too far, let's start the tapping - just to make it easier when I can finish it off later


    Turned down, parted off the stock, in the freezer it goes. It will make the sleeve shrink, just a little.


    The cheese plate goes in the oven, which will make it expand just a little.


    Pull 'em both out, on a brick, line the sleeve up and a quick tap with the hammer and she's looking good!



    AAAAAARGH - go to put it back in and it's a little too big for the base plate!


    Back into the lathe you go, sitting screwed onto a bolt and we'll grind it back a touch with a dremel...


    Ahhh, that's better!


    Step 10 - ok, time to put it all back together, gently, in the reverse order to how you disassembled it. The only tricky bit is the rubber, you have to work carefully to get the edges aligned and pushed neatly into the recess.

    Step 11 - sit back and take a breather. YEAH BABY!!!


    Step 12 - final test. Throw it on the tripod and answer the question - "Does it bend?". This is rock solid now, I feel very confident it will behave itself from now on.

    That's all folks
    "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

  • #2
    Nice work!

    Looks like there's room for a roll of film....

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      Good Work, CapS.
      "In all the human societies we have ever reviewed, in every age and in every state, there has seldom if ever been a shortage of eager young males prepared to kill and die to preserve the security, comfort and prejudices of their elders, and what you call heroism is just an expression of this fact; there is never a scarcity of idiots." -The Culture

      Comment


      • #4
        awesome write up!

        You're a brave brave man. I would have grudingly handed over the bills for the replacement.
        For LAMS information and resources - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-156358/
        For LAMS discussion and to ask questions - http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...thread-143289/

        Comment


        • #5
          May I make a suggestion?

          Hang a 5kg weight underneath the tripod. Helps stop is shaking in the wind and makes it harder to knock over.
          You put the c*nt in country run

          Comment


          • #6
            I look back at this 'project' and shake my head at the blind gung-ho stupidity with which I attacked it. The kind of blind faith which leads to learning stuff and getting better at doing stuff. Happy resultah!

            Room for film only on the receiver side, no canister slot. This isn't a bad thing, it means there's no temptation to play retro fit "just because I can". If I go back to film it will be 645 or 6x6 MF and a decent scanner. And I'm tempted, believe me.

            re weight under tripod - yes. Most of the tripod shooting I'm doing these days is fixed setups in a studio environment so don't have to worry so much about wind etc, but the weight works well out in the wild!
            "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

            Comment


            • #7
              nice writeup.

              makes me wish i had some tools. and a workshop...
              im a holding, stroking, loving machine...also spanking


              Comment


              • #8
                Nice writeup.

                Wish I had your tools
                such comment
                wow
                many post

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cam View Post
                  Nice writeup.

                  Wish I had your tools


                  Bunnings, dude

                  Actually you can pick up lathe and drill press for about a grand these days - it's not that expensive to get started off any more.
                  "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The most expensive tool in those shots is Capt. *fish himself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      piss off, desmo.









                      everyone knows i'm cheap...
                      "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Captain Starfish View Post
                        re weight under tripod - yes. Most of the tripod shooting I'm doing these days is fixed setups in a studio environment so don't have to worry so much about wind etc, but the weight works well out in the wild!
                        Still good to use a weight. It just makes the Tripod the little harder to knock over if ya bump it.
                        You put the c*nt in country run

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cbr1k View Post
                          May I make a suggestion?

                          Hang a 5kg weight underneath the tripod. Helps stop is shaking in the wind and makes it harder to knock over.
                          Good idea.(adds to internal memory for future use)

                          Nice write up, i would've made it to the stage where it's all apart then fuck it up lol.
                          Success is nothing more then taking advantage of an opportunity.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hey *fish, how easy is it to do SMD stuff (CF reader module) with a precision iron?
                            Or do I need SMD tools?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              SMD is possible (and in some cases easier) than through hole with normal tools.

                              Temp controlled iron, normal electronics style solder are good for 0603 jellybeans if you have steady hands or most of us klutzes can manage 1206 format. TQFP is doable fairly easily too.

                              Extra tools that make it a shedload easier (ie possible):
                              - A syringe of purpose made solder flux (I use interflux IF 8300)
                              - A good stable means of holding your board in place.
                              - One of those ring flouro lights with the magnifying glass in the middle.

                              More newerer boards are using a lot of BGA parts which you can pretty much forget about hand soldering with any degree of reliability. You really need to be able to reach the PCB pad with the iron - so if you see a component but no pads around it, meaning they're under it, you need to speak with one of the guys who are a lot better at this shit than I am.

                              Check first, then go to it. The flux makes it a LOT easier to avoid pesky bridges between pads and so on. But it's corrosive so make sure you wash the board down with a brush and isopropynol afterwards
                              "Once upon a time we would obey in public, but in private we would be cynical; today, we announce cynicism, but in private we obey."

                              Comment

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