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DIY custom fit, fibreglass sub box...

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  • DIY custom fit, fibreglass sub box...

    so, hardly bike related, but none the less its a little project of mine i thought might interest a few people.

    as per the title, im building my own moulded fibreglass sub box to fit in the boot of my '09 FG falcon.

    ive played with a few car stereos now, and always wanted to give something like this a crack. now, ive found out how.

    it'll be a while before this is finished, well, properly anyway. i wont have subs and amps for a while, and given this is a very late model car (for me) i dont want to pull the interior apart more than i have too, so i will be aiming to upgrade speakers, install amps and the like all at the same time. but hey, doesn't hurt to get started on this.

    anyway, first up, clean the boot. easy, there was nothing in it

    next up, line the area (and a bit further) you want the box moulded to (i chose the entire right hand side of the boot) with masking tape. painter's blue is meant to be the go, as apperently it is not very absorbent. sticks very well to the carpets too, and leaves no residue when removed. i used about 70M of this stuff :o

    on top of that, lay down, and tape down some Al foil. basically, this helps prevent any resin from soaking through, and may also make it easy to remove the mould from the boot later on. once you've done that, cover the rest of the boot. a plastic drop sheet works a treat. tape it down near your work surface.

    get messy! cut the fibre glass into workable sized peices, larger for flat areas, smaller for curves, and then mix up some resin. i found about 200ml was a good batch size to use, otherwise it starts setting before you have used it all.

    section by section, wet down the tape/foil, and apply the fibreglass. make sure the glass gets coated properly from the top too. (it'll start getting transparent)
    it took me about 2-3 batches to get 1-1+1/2 layers done. and you'll need at least 2 layers.

    thats as far as ive got right now.... i'll be attempting to pull the mould from the boot tomorrow, at which point ill add some more layers, and be able to see where i have missed. *fingers crossed*

    pics now... updates tomorrow.
    The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

  • #2
    um, or not... pics not uploading. ill try again soon.
    The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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    • #3
      Awesome! With a little patience the box broke free of the boot without any dramas. And NO resin seeped through to the carpet. Awesome!

      Peeling all of the tape and foil away from the sub box is a prick of a job though. Sone parts come away easy. Many don't. Just a matter of patience though. Besides, this is only the back, its not critical.

      Once I've peeled as much away as I can be bothered with, ill be going over the back of the box with some resin where the fiberglass was bot properly coated, and also begining to add layers of glass to the INSIDE of the box, so as not to alter the shape that needs to fit the boot.

      (still struggling with images)
      The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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      • #4
        Did you use a bristle roller to get the air bubbles out, followed by a bolt roller ? Not that strength is a big issue in this application. Scarify the surface with a coarse disc sander / angle grinder and brush the dust off with a dry brush before putting new layers of glass on.
        "I drink it when I'm happy and when I'm sad. Sometimes I drink it when I'm alone. When I have company I consider it obligatory. I trifle with it if I'm not hungry and drink it when I am. Otherwise, I never touch it," she once said, "unless I'm thirsty."
        Madame Lilly Bollinger

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        • #5
          Didn't use a roller. Never have. (when doing bike repairs)

          I've found a little patience and a lot of resin seams to get the job done though I'm sure if I was constructing a boat or something requiring structural strength, that may be different.

          Will give it a rough up before I start layering. I have seen layers 'split' before on my bikes, though I guess those fairings flex a lot more than this will. Cheers for the tip
          The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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          • #6
            using a roller is advisable as it squeezes any air out from between the layers. I'd also make the fiberglass as thick as possible as fiberglass has a really low resonating frequency and if its to thin will sound terrible and be lacking in really low bass. Although you can "bandaid" fix this by putting a sound deadening material inside the enclosure.
            B19 Oakford V.B.F.S

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            • #7

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              • #8
                pics working!
                IMAG0081.jpg

                IMAG0082.jpg

                IMAG0084.jpg

                IMAG0085.jpg

                IMAG0086.jpg
                The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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                • #9
                  IMAG0087.jpg

                  IMAG0090.jpg

                  since this pic, i have pulled of as much foil/tape as posible from the back of the box. i couldnt get it all off though. solution? another batch of resin seals it all in, and means no more sticky tape backing (remember, the sticky side faces out).

                  ive also thrown another layer on the inside. though ill need to do a few more before it's solid enough.

                  next up, i'll need to get a few MDF rings made to hold, and countersink the subs. one ring is made to mount the sub, and the other just larger than the sub, effectively sitting around it, so the sub sits 'in' the box, not on the outside of it. this will then get braced into position where the subs need to be mounted before i can begin moulding the front of the box.

                  Unsure if i want 10"s or 12"s or one of each, but this box is gonna be made to hold two.
                  The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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                  • #10
                    The volume of the box my dictate what you can use sub wise and size wise also.

                    Subs will make noise but wont sound good unless the enclosure is right.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fozzy View Post
                      The volume of the box my dictate what you can use sub wise and size wise also.

                      Subs will make noise but wont sound good unless the enclosure is right.
                      once i decide on subs, i can figure out if i need to fill the box, or make it larger. (that woolen type padding found in many boxes can fool the sub into thinking the box is larger)

                      just drove the car... she stinks of resin.
                      The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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                      • #12
                        Can I ask why you chose against using mdf for the enclosure, as it is a dense material with better properties for sub freq?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Spina View Post
                          Can I ask why you chose against using mdf for the enclosure, as it is a dense material with better properties for sub freq?
                          boot space.

                          you'd never get a paif of subs crammed into this (largely unusable) section of the boot, with MDF. Given it reaches to the edge of the boot, you can maximise the box volume without wasting space. There are plenty of cars out there with fibreglass boxes, so i dont 'think' it can be that bad. i guess time will tell. worst case scenario, i throw it in the bin, admit defeat, and buy a box.

                          (plus, fibreglass installs do look pretty cool )
                          The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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                          • #14
                            Moulded fit does look great, I hope it doof doofs your head flaps off.

                            Was thinking 2x10's in a V formation opposed to each other might be worth a thought they fire off reasonbly well when opposed like this. Good punch from 10's and if space a premium it helps reduce also. Nice small section of plexiglass infront to show off the hardware, walla!!!

                            Just dont forget a good ventilation flow for your amp(s)

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                            • #15
                              hmm. amps... really not sure where to put those :/ maybe another custom fitted box on the opposite side, as i'd really rather not go drilling holes in OEM equipment, or otherwise a simple mdf box/plate butted up against the back of the rear seats.

                              have to do some research to see how important angles are, but at this stage, would like to have both subs pointed in the same direction. flat as the horizon lies, but turned to aim out of the boot (equally) at about 45deg. i can already see this will be hard to stretch my mould to shape, but the best thing is, you determine the shape before resin ever touches it, so you have all the time in the world to get this stage right.
                              The greatest excitement comes from besting who you were yesterday.

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