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Who makes autonomous machines in the mines possible?

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  • Who makes autonomous machines in the mines possible?

    Looking for a change of field and this whole autonomous machines thing sounds interesting. I would like to know who makes, installs, sets up and maintains the systems necessary, what kind of professions are involved and what are the names of companies in the Perth/WA area.
    Cheers guys

  • #2
    skynet

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    • #3
      Remote control technologies in kewdale.

      A lot of electrical engineering as well as manufacture and sales.
      Originally posted by slipin
      IF ITS TO LOWED ! YOUR TOO OLD

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      • #4
        Re: Who makes autonomous machines in the mines possible?

        Originally posted by stoner View Post
        whs
        this mob did the remotes for the boggers at work on the old site. was a hell of a lot less temperamental than the system on em before.
        Every one has a story.....

        http://www.perthstreetbikes.com/foru...updates-82338/

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        • #5
          just about all industrial process plants are controlled by some combination of scada dcs plc. they are coded and designed by programmers, process and chemical engineers, electrical engineers sometimes by mechatronics engineers.

          all the engineering firms such as gres lyco akers ausenco will either have in house human resources with specialities that cover these fields or will sub contract to electrical engineering specialists.

          it is usually a combined effort. process knows the why and how, electrical implements the hardware and computing translates control narratives into the various code platforms required.
          Last edited by g0zer; 18-01-2013, 06:18 AM.
          Originally posted by Bendito
          If we get to a stop and we are missing a dozen bikes and you are last, it was your fault. Don't be that guy. No one likes that guy.

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          • #6
            Who makes autonomous machines in the mines possible?

            Minestar, the trucks up at Solomon are run by cat themselfs I believe
            Originally posted by Canada
            Even if I was interested in vagina I'd probably be looking for something a little bit stronger... I don't go for sissies

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            • #7
              Yeah I did some survey work at Solomon for Cat
              they had a few American guys setting this up for them inhouse

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              • #8
                The CAT system is called MineStar, it covers a range of machines. From the large dump trucks to loading tools, at the moment only the trucks run autonomous. Other equipment interacts with it, but is still manned or remote driven.
                There is also MINEGEM which is the product for underground gear such as boggers etc, this is autonomy as well. Solomon had the Autonomy GoLive date yesterday with all sorts of big wigs there.
                Higher level of Living, Eastern Hills Area

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                • #9
                  A large amount of the push for Autonomy in Australian Mining is being done by Rio Tinto and comes through the Rio Tinto Centre for Mine Automation.

                  They are the major leaders in this field but there are plenty of other smaller players and multi-nationals coming on to the scene now.

                  If you are looking at a university / academic role, send me a pm as I have contacts for people in this area.

                  Jobs in this area are few and far between and they tend to bring in more experts from overseas that want to immigrate to Perth rather than using local talent.

                  If you want to work for a multi-national that do some degree of design, sales and construction of these systems you could look at the likes of ABB, Honeywell, Siemens etc.

                  Transmin is a very good example of a local company that design and develop robotics solutions as well. There are a few other people in this area but their names escape me at the moment - will edit and update as I remember them.
                  Originally posted by polonY
                  Don't worry about shitting people off. Unless you ride a ninja 250 or a cbr250rrrrrr

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                  • #10
                    CSEMAT do the programming and control for the Citech systems. Bayswater
                    Originally posted by Rich...
                    You got me in trouble...

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                    • #11
                      The larger installations usually run a DCS for automation. Design, programming and commissioning is carried out by the DCS vendor, some examples: Yokogawa, Siemens, Honeywell, ABB.

                      Take a look at these companies and see what is required for these jobs. If you're interested in going down this path, Murdoch university offers an automation degree specifically aimed at becoming proficient with these type of systems.

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                      • #12
                        Also as [MENTION=11568]mcmurray[/MENTION] said murdoch's degree is valuable however if you want to focus on a broader less focuses automation role, may I suggest you also consider Mechatronic Engineering at Curtin. I have a guy I worked with for a few years do this degree and now he works for Siemens as a Research Development Engineer for the automation systems division
                        Originally posted by Rich...
                        You got me in trouble...

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                        • #13
                          Mechatronics is the most useless degree ever - don't waste your time with it
                          Originally posted by polonY
                          Don't worry about shitting people off. Unless you ride a ninja 250 or a cbr250rrrrrr

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                          • #14
                            The minestar system has been tested on Rio Tinto sites but they turfed in favour of the autonomous system Komatsu came up with as it has extra redundancies built in that Minestar isn't capable of.

                            I'm not sure who supplies the Komatsu gear but it works a lot better than Minestar.
                            Originally posted by Desmo
                            Why be a cunt about it?

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                            • #15
                              ^^^^
                              This isn't 100% true, RIO use Modular on all their sites they use Komatsu trucks for hauling. It isn't actually a Komatsu system, it is a stand alone that is installed on the machine. It doesn't intergrate with CAT gear as well, based on the fact that CAT has its own product. Why would they want it to, it would keep them out of business
                              RIO uses MineStar on all of its site for the loading and dozing and drilling tools, it is actually the prefered system for them. The only reason they have Komatsu trucks is because of a global alliance agreement in place between the two.

                              MineStar is a far superior system, hence why BHP dumped Modular after 20+ years and signed all of its sites up for the CAT system. FMG is the same they have turfed Jigsaw and implemented MineStar at all their sites. Currently there is over 1000 machines in the state running something from the CAT MineStar system.
                              Higher level of Living, Eastern Hills Area

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