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Today's debate - does this accurately describe Gen Y?

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  • Today's debate - does this accurately describe Gen Y?

    I think it makes some valid points, FWIW, but of course it's over-general - as all these sorts of articles must be.

    Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy | Wait But Why
    "He who joyfully marches to music rank and file, has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice." Albert Einstein

  • #2
    Maybe the phrases gaining popularity are just common for older people - since that's where most of the worlds population is at. 'Follow your passion' only popular in the past 20 years? Well shit, that'd be the 40-60 year olds over the past 20 years who are sick of their shit-kicker job. I don't think a 0-20 year old would be worried about that.

    I really like the point they make about 'image crafting' on social media. My wife falls for it all the time. Thinks Facebook is real and her friends are actually interesting, well traveled and wealthy people etc.

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    • #3
      The notion the hard work pays off isn't true anymore.

      The world is a very different place to what the Baby Boomer generation grew up in.
      In sterquiliniis invenitur.

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      • #4
        I have more to do with the tail end of this mob (1988 onwards) and while there a few exceptions I find most to be quite intelligent realists who I can talk quite openly with and fill me with optimism for the future.

        In saying that there is one who fills the expectations of the article but he is closer to thirty. When I worked with him I would toy with the idea of making him cry he would annoy me that much.
        They hung a sign up in our town "If you live it up, you won't live it down"-Tom Waits

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        • #5
          There is always discussion about 'hard word doesn't pay off anymore' in the City-data forums (employment section). Seems particularly true for America with the amount of College graduates they churn out - Engineering degrees working at Starbucks or not even being able to land volunteer work. Pretty scary given they also have $100k+ debt because they were fed the dream that it will all be worth it.
          Last edited by INTJ; 15-01-2014, 02:19 PM. Reason: Dyslexic moment

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          • #6
            I find the idea that someone who has a college education can't find volunteer work confusing. My ex can find volunteer work for goodness sake.

            I know we're in Australia so it must be easier to take someone's work for nothing here (?), but I'm looking forward to a moment I can afford to pay someone to do some of the work here. As it happens I can't pay myself a full wage yet, but maybe by the end of the calendar year we'll be hiring.

            If someone genuinely wanted to turn up and work for nothing for me, they'd be in on the ground floor and I'd insure them and show them lots of stuff. I'm not advertising the opportunity, and I will pay someone son enough, but the idea that you can't get work for nothing is ludicrous, and frankly I don't believe it.
            www.hurtlegear.com.au

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            • #7
              I was born in 88.

              I have no problem with hardwork. In fact i enjoy it, however i dont consider sitting on my bum doing data entry as hard work. Not that it isnt i personally prefer to be up and moving and working up a sweat.

              I just want a job that i enjoy and have passion for and pays the bills enough that i can go on a decent holiday once a year and have a few toys.
              A computer once beat me at chess, but it was no match for me at kick boxing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hurtlegear View Post
                I find the idea that someone who has a college education can't find volunteer work confusing. My ex can find volunteer work for goodness sake.

                I know we're in Australia so it must be easier to take someone's work for nothing here (?), but I'm looking forward to a moment I can afford to pay someone to do some of the work here. As it happens I can't pay myself a full wage yet, but maybe by the end of the calendar year we'll be hiring.

                If someone genuinely wanted to turn up and work for nothing for me, they'd be in on the ground floor and I'd insure them and show them lots of stuff. I'm not advertising the opportunity, and I will pay someone son enough, but the idea that you can't get work for nothing is ludicrous, and frankly I don't believe it.
                Maybe it's the fact that 500 people graduate at the same time in the same city with the same degree, and an employer (such as yourself) has the luxury of not only having all 500 people begging for the opportunity to have volunteer work to put down on their resume so they 'stand out', but you can even be a real fussy bugger and only choose those with a Masters degree or other volunteer experience and totally overlook the others... it's a shitty situation for recent graduates to be in because there's just so many of them. I agree with what you're saying and I just think in Australia we haven't got a clue how hard it can be...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by black500r View Post
                  Maybe it's the fact that 500 people graduate at the same time in the same city with the same degree, and an employer (such as yourself) has the luxury of not only having all 500 people begging for the opportunity to have volunteer work to put down on their resume so they 'stand out', but you can even be a real fussy bugger and only choose those with a Masters degree or other volunteer experience and totally overlook the others... it's a shitty situation for recent graduates to be in because there's just so many of them. I agree with what you're saying and I just think in Australia we haven't got a clue how hard it can be...
                  Maybe Australia has different values as a whole community. To be honest, I wouldn't feel really great about someone who isn't getting a wage putting in for more than say, a month for me anyway, but if someone asked me, once I'd satisfied myself there was an up side for them, I'd very probably give it a crack.

                  I have twice had businesses that were making a reasonable living for me vanish virtually overnight, once when a major supplier just called out of the blue and said they didn't want to supply me anymore. Refused to give a reason, probably because the reason was at best marginally lawful. Another time we'd built a business on being ranked #1 by Google, overnight they changed their algorithm, and we went from being found at #3, where #1 and #2 weren't selling anything, to somewhere on the 47th page. Lessons learned, but I think I have a guess about how hard it can be.
                  www.hurtlegear.com.au

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                  • #10
                    Thinking yourself special is not unique to Gen y.

                    Just ask a baby boomer if they think they deserve their generous government beniefts for example!

                    I like the idea that happines = expectations - reality. I partially blame the internet and the boom of information to have altered expectations.

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                    • #11
                      Just sounded like a load of un-ambitious crap.

                      I am a 1987 child, and there I know the difference between being ambitious, and an over-inflated sense of entitlement.

                      As a kid we used to all have to wake up at 9pm after bedtime to go pick up my Dad from the train station, as he was at tafe doing diplomas to further his career. I watched his success grow and saw the hardwork, and can now sit back and see him relax and enjoy his hard work.

                      I took an apprenticeship over the university spot I was offered, and have put in 10 years to get to where I am, and I am well aware there is a way to go to reach my goals. The greatest thing I ever did was my apprenticeship as it taught me the values of hard work and literally having to earn every $1.

                      /rant.

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                      • #12
                        Reminds me of this video:
                        ..oh yeah it is Jim Jefferies, definately NSFW!

                        Last edited by Visitor; 16-01-2014, 11:07 AM.
                        Tomorrow: A mystical land where 99% of all human productivity, motivation, and achievement is stored.


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                        • #13
                          I see this is a few mid-teens, and saw it in a few mid-teens when I was a mid-teen 30 odd years ago. After the "tough" generations of the pre-baby-boomers we are all soft-cocks. Too much emphasis on "being an individual" and over-achieving, rather than just being ourselves and being nice to each other. I tend to think the "problem" children hear something like Alan Watts - If Money were no Object (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnFUDVpFwFQ), and believe it to an extreme, to the exclusion of all else. They get sucked into the idea that you need to be rich & in a job that you LOVE & be successful/promoted in that job & appreciated by others for your efforts & ad infinitum --- in order to be happy. This is not an age or generational issue, it's simply the basis for the First-World-Problems phenomenon.
                          Originally posted by Skut
                          ...the problem is that no-one wants to listen to an expert, just to have their own position/circumstance supported or be acknowledged.

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                          • #14
                            I imagine a lot of business for the mental health industry comes from women getting themselves used to the idea that a handsome (handsome as defined by TV), rich (rich as defined by magazines) and providing man will pluck them from the crowd and gift them the life they deserve. When reality hits they can't help but feel like they settled, resenting their husband for not being their dream man while he resents her for not being the freak in the bed model he had on the back of his eyes growing up.
                            This is general advice only and does not take into account your individual objectives, financial situation or needs (your personal circumstances). Before using this advice to decide whether to purchase a product you should consider how appropriate it is in regard to your personal circumstances.

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                            • #15
                              I thought it was Happiness = Success / Expectations

                              Deciphering between what is real and what is facebook phoniness/hiphop video fantasy is all about being smart. I would say Lucy is unhappy because she is naïve. She'll grow out of it, but the Carpe Diem tattoo was a big mistake

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