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Wahoo and the gm grain debate

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  • GsxInShed
    replied
    ^^^ Other than financial...what are the implications of this exit.? ^^^

    Leave a comment:


  • agrid
    replied
    Interesting.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-1...eeding/7839856

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  • GsxInShed
    replied
    Originally posted by agrid View Post
    Nestle! One of the most despised food companies in the world.
    are you sure..??

    Leave a comment:


  • agrid
    replied
    Nestle! One of the most despised food companies in the world.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wahoo
    replied
    Genetically modified organisms are "political dynamite" warns Greg Harvey, chief executive of Interflour, one of Asia's largest millers.
    Singapore-based Interflour, one of the world's largest flour millers, buys 6m tonnes of wheat annually, primarily from Australia, and supplies flour across South East Asia and Turkey.
    Mr Harvey said the technology was "too much of a hot potato".
    "[High profile] companies like Nestle will not have anything that contains GMOs," Mr Harvey said.
    http://www.agrimoney.com/news/gm-cro...oss--9660.html

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  • agrid
    replied
    http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/con...6/s4485141.htm

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  • madmick68
    replied
    worth a read...apologies if already posted:

    http://gmoinquiry.ca/wp-content/uplo...rops-foods.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • Wahoo
    replied
    Farmers have compulsory levies on every tonne of grain produced that is the primary funder of GRDC which funds research and development. The biodiversity for pest and climatic change is non-GM. There is no commercial release anywhere in the world of GM wheat or barley.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skut
    replied
    Originally posted by agrid View Post
    This response highlights just how much you more need to learn about agricultural research, biosecurity and market access.

    I have co-authored several papers with one of the professors at UC Davis and, given that you have apparently heard of this university, you might be interested in this presentation by one of their Cooperative Extension Specialists.

    http://169.237.28.91/AnimalBiotech/m...iryWebinar.pdf

    - - - Updated - - -

    A range of biotypes exist throughout the world where RWA is distributed, with 8 biotypes in the USA alone.
    This variation poses a serious threat to Australia’s barley and wheat production, as an
    incursion’s origin will influence the level of resistance that will be available in our varieties. As such, GRDC
    are conducting research for pre-emptive breeding to develop wheat and barley varieties
    with RWA resistance with wide adaptation to Australia’s grain growing regions.
    Some unscientific dickhead has been banging on in this thread about crop bio-diversity being important for food security so as not being decimated by a single pest or climactic change since that would be logical.

    I am glad your quoting of studies brings you to a similar yet roundabout and painful conclusion

    Leave a comment:


  • Taylor
    replied
    The dicks are swinging in here lately.

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  • Wahoo
    replied
    Originally posted by agrid View Post
    This response highlights just how much you more need to learn about agricultural research, biosecurity and market access.

    I have co-authored several papers with one of the professors at UC Davis and, given that you have apparently heard of this university, you might be interested in this presentation by one of their Cooperative Extension Specialists.

    http://169.237.28.91/AnimalBiotech/m...iryWebinar.pdf
    .
    Oh, I see, it is not about GM, it is about the work you do. Fair enough as I mistakenly thought you were implying it was a reason for GM wheat.
    And I do appreciate research and biosecurity. Have no intention to claim I know as much as you do on this topic though as it is your area of expertise.
    Last edited by Wahoo; 02-06-2016, 06:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • GsxInShed
    replied
    Originally posted by simmrr View Post
    So how would you gm against aphids?
    Raise the temperature of the planet by 0.2-2.5 deg annually over a 5-50 year period.

    Some immediate crop losses may be evident...in the long term balance will be restored.

    In some cases eradication is simple... burn the lot... regrow with minimal loss of income....For the supermarkets.

    but sadly a total rethink of income stream for the cropper/farmer.

    Leave a comment:


  • xrsism
    replied
    So how would you gm against aphids?

    Leave a comment:


  • agrid
    replied
    Originally posted by Wahoo View Post
    Yes but it is a pest and aphids are a common problem, this is just a new one and nothing to do with an urgent need to commercialise GM wheat when no market will buy GM wheat. Would be cheaper for the farmer not to deal with the pest and let them eat the crop if it was GM as you would not be able to sell it anyway. Farmers control aphids now and have losses if they leave them unmanaged so it is not going to devastate the industry. Planting early is a key management to aphid control.
    OK, Plant Health Australia: "This pest has spread throughout all major grain growing countries except Australia." http://www.planthealthaustralia.com....t-aphid-FS.pdf
    That means that if it is as bad as you say, Australian wheat would be worth more as everyone else would not be able to grow wheat if they have these aphids. That isn't happening.
    Glad you are excited about something else though
    This response highlights just how much you more need to learn about agricultural research, biosecurity and market access.

    I have co-authored several papers with one of the professors at UC Davis and, given that you have apparently heard of this university, you might be interested in this presentation by one of their Cooperative Extension Specialists.

    http://169.237.28.91/AnimalBiotech/m...iryWebinar.pdf

    - - - Updated - - -

    Those playing at home might be interested to learn about the impact of Russian wheat aphid in: Exotic plant pests – a threat to the sustainability of Australia’s grains industry

    Russian wheat aphid – overall risk High
    Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) is a major pest of barley and wheat but can attack most cereal crops.
    Russian wheat aphid (RWA) can cause significant yield losses if not controlled, especially in barley which is
    more susceptible. It is absent from Australia, but is found in most other major wheat growing regions including
    Russia, the Middle East, North and South America, Asia, Africa and most countries bordering the Mediterranean.
    USA incursion
    Since the first detection of RWA in South West USA in 1986, the total economic damage due to the pest has
    exceeded $1 billion. These damages include costs from crop losses, cost of pest control, and lost revenue to rural
    economies throughout the seventeen affected western states. The barley industry in the USA has been severely
    impacted upon by RWA since its incursion. Barley is very susceptible to RWA, resulting in the rapid decline of
    malt barley production with it virtually ceasing in badly affected areas.
    It is not unreasonable to expect a similar impact in Australia if RWA was to become established.

    Impact
    Climatic modelling indicates that RWA would spread rapidly and become established across most of the
    major cropping regions within Australia. Estimates of crop damage range from 25-50% and up to 80% for
    some regions.

    A range of biotypes exist throughout the world where RWA is distributed, with 8 biotypes in the USA alone.
    This variation poses a serious threat to Australia’s barley and wheat production, as an
    incursion’s origin will influence the level of resistance that will be available in our varieties. As such, GRDC
    are conducting research for pre-emptive breeding to develop wheat and barley varieties
    with RWA resistance with wide adaptation to Australia’s grain growing regions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wahoo
    replied
    Yes but it is a pest and aphids are a common problem, this is just a new one and nothing to do with an urgent need to commercialise GM wheat when no market will buy GM wheat. Would be cheaper for the farmer not to deal with the pest and let them eat the crop if it was GM as you would not be able to sell it anyway. Farmers control aphids now and have losses if they leave them unmanaged so it is not going to devastate the industry. Planting early is a key management to aphid control.
    OK, Plant Health Australia: "This pest has spread throughout all major grain growing countries except Australia." http://www.planthealthaustralia.com....t-aphid-FS.pdf
    That means that if it is as bad as you say, Australian wheat would be worth more as everyone else would not be able to grow wheat if they have these aphids. That isn't happening.
    Glad you are excited about something else though

    Leave a comment:

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