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Adrenaline junkie

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  • Adrenaline junkie

    Hi everyone, Here’s the joint to post up you’re top extreme moments.
    Can be anything,eg,... skydiving, riding motogp bike,........
    or just something you may have hope to do one day an whet all the way an did it!
    What injection of adrenaline gets you off this planet? 🌏

  • #2
    Yet to find it to be honest on a level where I can repeatedly and consistently "enjoy" it.

    Motorcycling and even motorcycle racing I approach with a calm resolve and enjoy it without getting the fear that would trigger an an adrenalin high. The racing I did and the FNR rides of old, while certainly had an element of danger never got the adrenaline going, heart rate sure, as its physically demanding. But I always felt that I was doing I still had that bit left in reserve should something unexpected occur.

    I've always been more scared of getting caught than I have of getting hurt. As such I only get the shakes when pulled over by the fuzz (or having just evaded getting pulled over by the fuzz) and the adrenaline comes in the form of fear of not knowing exactly how much they have witnessed me doing leading up to a roadside conversation/knock on the door. So while a rush is there, it's hardly a sustainable exercise.

    On the track obviously the element of law enforcement (and a host of other hazards) is absent, as such I could simply enjoy going faster without distractions. The other such adrenaline rushes only come when you have an extremely close call, a wheelie that goes too far and you get that sicking floating sensation, a close call with a kangaroo/car/bike/etc, an out of seat near high side, again not the things you actively seek out and repeat at any level of consistency or repeatability without risking serious injury, bills and hospital food.

    I've done skydiving and while the freefall component, and the initial step from the plane is what does it for most, being a tall lanky individual, I was too preoccupied dealing with leg cramp from shuffling around in the cramped freezing cold fuselage to enjoy it, and preferred piloting the chute and would have loved to pull chute at 14,000 feet and spend a few minutes in the air as opposed 9000 of them passing by in 60 seconds. I think if I was 5ft tall instead of 6 this wouldn't have been a problem.

    The only other times I have had an adrenaline rush is after sustaining an injury, where the adrenaline overcomes the pain, until you realise you will be ok and the adrenaline drop sees you go light headed, and you better sit yourself down before your body finds its own way there. Again not something that you would want to do with any level of repeatability.

    Oddly, I have a weird relationship with heights, I did love being suspended from a parachute, I could climb the ladders offshore some 60m up and walk on grating over the ocean in high wind and seas. Yet recently working in an EWP at full extension, I'm pretty sure a little bit of wee came out.
    Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

    Comment


    • #3
      As above, if you a talking real adrenaline then it does come from "firsts", as in the the first time you try something a bit dangerous, or from near misses...

      You don't want to actively seek out near misses, as said above it's not sustainable...

      I did Hang gliding and whilst a couple of "firsts" while learning it did provide good rushes it soon became normal, as this is what good training aims to achieve...

      So by the time I had to just step off cliff whilst attached to a big kite it was nothing more than a nice calming experience of solitude and wind in your face...

      Sailing a yacht single handed in a bit of weather can provide good rushes...

      Comment


      • #4
        Yep, a list of firsts is certainly there to get the rush, first time on a bike, first time on the track, first wheelie, first stoppie, first time kissing a girl, and first time going all the way.

        But after that it becomes a matter of learning, improving and basically getting better at what you know.
        Trying to think of a wise and sincere signature quote, but the only words that leap to mind are, "TITTY SPRINKLES"

        Comment


        • #5
          This is the big one for me.

          Had heart surgery - was a 3 hour wide awake experience, with them wearing lead aprons and me being x-rayed in motion (real time). Similar procedure to an angiogram, but I didn't need a balloon as arteries were not blocked.
          Anyhoo once they finished burning holes in my heart (had an electrical fault that set my heart racing) they had to test their handy work.
          They gave me the heads up and told me to relax then in goes a big shot of adrenaline. Felt fucken mint! Remember it like it was yesterday.

          Lots of self induced adrenaline leading up to the big day, as you can imagine.

          Surgery was successful, that was 22 years ago. Good work people, changed my life.

          Adrenaline good!

          Comment


          • #6
            Getting 'Lit Up' by the cops ...usually makes my scalp tingle...

            amidoinitrite ?
            " Imagination is the seed of life..."

            Comment


            • #7
              sitting in a field at the bottom of the flying kilo at the Ulster GP this year as a spectator done it for me. 4 a breast doing 320kph on irish B roads sure does get the adrenaline pumping

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              • #8
                Reporting sick to work when I'm fine

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                • #9
                  Incidents in life happen and afterwards you think, “Wow!”
                  Usually the event is done and dusted before you have time to consider, “That was a rush!”
                  Having time to realise you are riding a Rocket Sledge to hell is quite something, totally out of control and not being able to do anything about.

                  I was operating a Clark 666B logging in the Alps. After lunch I ran out of brakes when I dropped its arse end of the track preparing to run the main rope out for another ‘drag’. Went arse up into the trees below only being able to stop by smashing it into forward and giving it shit. The Faller had a lucky escape.
                  Back to the skid site and the bush boss sent me packing back to the workshop to get the brakes fixed before I killed someone or myself.
                  So, off Sunday Mountain I go. I kept the machine in ‘work’ range for the drive off the mountains steep stuff. Getting towards the bottom the haul road has become a major forestry logging truck road. I glide to a halt. Select ‘Travel’ range and continue. The mistake!
                  Unbeknown to me at the time the linkages on the range shifter wear and pick up high range but don’t lock. As soon as the engine reaches full noise the gear is thrown out and you are in neutral.
                  Away I go off the bottom of the Mountain. I felt a lurch as the trans caught the engine I was now a roller coaster with no brakes. All I could do was keep my foot on the go peddle so I had responsive steering which was a lever on the right side of the seat.
                  80kph in an articulated, earthmoving tyred with no suspension on a gravel road was .... exciting.
                  My first thought was to drop the blade on the ground. Unlike a dozer the blade hits the ground at a very accrute angle and it has happened in Kiangaroa a few months before and the 20t machine went end over end and broke into 2 pieces and they removed the operator with a stick and a spoon aided by a fire hose.
                  That option was out.
                  At 100kph in front of me was a set of right, left and right combination that dropped into a river crossing.
                  I made the first right hander on two wheels, the left was tighter so I decided to grab the crash bar, hang on tight and close my eyes.
                  Hit the wind row. Launched the machine at least 3m into the air.
                  The first few trees I hit so hard it sheered them off at ground level like they were cut with a chain saw.
                  Velocity had reduced and I snapped the rest off at the height I hit them.
                  My last recollection was seeeing half a tree coming along the hood into the cab. I threw myself to the left so it didn’t hit me from the chest up.
                  Came around in hospital blind in one eye, a few busted bits. The blindness was through tearing my eyelid off and it being stitched back on and having an eye patch bandage.
                  A while later I returned to the scene of the crime. How far did I ride it? Well over 3kms. That is quite some time, it felt like seconds.
                  My prize for being a Crash Test Dummy, a new Clark 668. Woo Hoo. Totally worth it.
                  Young and Dumb. Didn’t think anything of it. Invincible.
                  After the death of my daughter I had my first nightmares over that incident, some 30 years later.
                  It is quite amazing what the mind can hide for years that you honestly thought had no effect and you laughed It off.
                  The incident did have major effect on my decision making through my life and quite unconsciously.
                  I never operated a machine type you didn’t have something to drop on the ground to stop.
                  So, Dump Trucks were definitely out and fuck 666.
                  Interestingly, the 668 had a much lower pivoted blade and blade would contact the ground in a level attitude. Although, the bouncing on rubber tyres, the nasty snap of articulated steering possibly would have no difference.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Environment plays a huge part on how one gets off,that rush,good an bad,an I’m also grateful to those people whom design products for one to be able to discover their own rush that eventually becomes a drug.
                    I’ve also had the Privilege an honour to be able share ones life with people whom give up their time unconditionally to allow me build my frist hill trolley as a kid, from that day on I wanted more, risk,danger,broken parts,an blood, anything that came as a result to get that rush.
                    Thirdly it takes time to achieve but you don’t do it alone,there are people with you whom in someway or form who have a influence.an drives you to Achieve you’re goal.
                    I like Billyboof’s recollection of his heart surgery, when everything around him was going on, he was still able to pick out the good things.
                    The Margs Bombie provided me that drug on my trusty 12” Gunther Rohn gun ,such elevator job, bloody hell that felt good !
                    I also acknowledge those with disabilities,body an mind .can achieve the most smallest things,an that massive smile.
                    Their own sense of belonging.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BillyBoof View Post
                      This is the big one for me.

                      Had heart surgery - was a 3 hour wide awake experience, with them wearing lead aprons and me being x-rayed in motion (real time). Similar procedure to an angiogram, but I didn't need a balloon as arteries were not blocked.
                      Anyhoo once they finished burning holes in my heart (had an electrical fault that set my heart racing) they had to test their handy work.
                      They gave me the heads up and told me to relax then in goes a big shot of adrenaline. Felt fucken mint! Remember it like it was yesterday.

                      Lots of self induced adrenaline leading up to the big day, as you can imagine.

                      Surgery was successful, that was 22 years ago. Good work people, changed my life.

                      Adrenaline good!
                      Did you have Wolf Parkinson White?
                      In sterquiliniis invenitur.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [MENTION=23653]Crobbo[/MENTION] yeah mate, so many times with the ticker charging along at 220 b/min lying in a hospital bed. Injection of isoptin, a sandwich and 30 min of observation and then discharged. Was a monthly routine for a long time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BillyBoof View Post
                          [MENTION=23653]Crobbo[/MENTION] yeah mate, so many times with the ticker charging along at 220 b/min lying in a hospital bed. Injection of isoptin, a sandwich and 30 min of observation and then discharged. Was a monthly routine for a long time.
                          Hahah I had it too. The ablation was a bit wild. I remember waking up naked on the table.

                          "Ok Chris we're going to give you some adrenaline" Nek minute heart is beating like wild... hahah.
                          In sterquiliniis invenitur.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What is this adrenalin you speak of.

                            Is it being anxious before something? Like your first ever motorcycle race and all you have is a $400 Suzuki 500cc Titan that you rebuilt the gearbox at 10 pm the night before. Wondering if the left over parts really were that necessary before the long right hander at the end of the straight. Wondering why you had entered in unlimited production race with 900 Kawasakis all around me. When the flag drops you just get on with it.

                            Is it that moment when you over cooked it into a corner on a country run and the feeling in your stomache sais now that was close?

                            Is it when the boss on Friday night leaves a message, see me in the office Monday early?

                            I guess there is anxiety and then an adrenalin rush, maybe one is about impending doom and the other about enjoying a risk that requires skill.

                            I know which one I cope with best.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Crobbo View Post
                              Hahah I had it too. The ablation was a bit wild. I remember waking up naked on the table.

                              "Ok Chris we're going to give you some adrenaline" Nek minute heart is beating like wild... hahah.
                              No way! Mah bruvva!

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