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  • How to: change riding style

    So i'm heading to the track this month for the first time in a l-o-n-g time... here's the thing:

    I've got a very upright riding style, and wish to learn the art of sliding a butt cheek off the seat and using some body weight over the side to save clearance/tyre... in a conventional modern style... but how to break the habit of a lifetime?
    I have tried to practice/mimiic this style on road rides a few times with guidance/laughter from riding mates, to no avail - i simply find it very very arkward, and end up feeling rather rattled and completely unsettled through corners.

    Anyone made the transition and have a few tips for me? I'm VERY keen to hear from those of you that have been where i am and have transitioned to a smooth/fast modern style.

    Is there a coach around that can assist me?
    Happy to pay for a coaching session or two (track), just not sure where/what the best forum is to undertake some lessons to transition... no free lunch and all that.

    Keep in mind i'm attempting to break a riding habit that is decades, not a few months in the making... thanks for any assistance/advice!

    S.
    Chuck Norris is 1/8th Cherokee. This has nothing to do with ancestry, the man ate a fucking Indian.

  • #2
    Hint ... Can you counter steer ...at slow speeds..? IF answer is yes. process is the same.

    Lock outer side leg to footpeg slide bum across seat ... look low over dash and tank... might help..?

    Of just focus on the road rushing by as you are suspended in the air above it. :-)

    honestly...... try the upright technique out first... on the track... Then think about how much metal is scraping / $? to replace scraped parts.. = motivation for change...
    " Imagination is the seed of life..."

    Comment


    • #3
      westy74 may be able to help. I'm sure he'll be there for this session in July
      I've got the same issue with kinking my body but I've trying to work on it by using my GoPro footage.
      what also helped is having Marty MOOSE setting up my bike made a heap of difference.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        1. Book a day at the track (RideDays www.mcrcwa.com.au)
        2. Talk to the coaches
        3. Listen to what they say
        4. Do what they say (this is the tricky bit)
        5. Don't expect to change over night
        6. Have fun (this is the easy bit)
        Originally posted by mekon
        Why are pirates called pirates?
        Because they Arrrrrr

        Comment


        • #5
          Thread summary:

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          ST.
          Last edited by SpeedTrip; 03-07-2016, 11:10 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Muscles might need a bit of working out to loosen up? My muscles are much tighter on my right side than my left which affects my body position on right handers :/ If I had physio before a track day it seemed a bit better.

            Comment


            • #7
              I took up track days, & then racing at almost 50 (after being away from bikes for 20 years) & had to do the same/similar thing .. tho I've always been a bit of a 'scratcher' on the road.

              If you ride really upright you may find you ride with ya elbows locked, gotta keep the elbows bent; what bike are you riding? As soon as you bend the elbows the load is transferred to your core so it's more tiring to start with.

              After working through my transition issues & my coaching observations once qualified & experienced enough I've concluded:

              . make your bike as good as it can be for the track, this helps in the confidence dept, if you're not worrying about the bike more time to work on the riding
              - I always ran new tyres for every race day, mainly for this reason; the one day I didn't I binned my shit tho I also binned it by being a muppett
              - get tyres, brakes & suspension as good as they can be before going to the track, get them checked over, fettled, & set up for you by Marty Moose & get educated for free
              . the obsession with getting ones 'knee down' leads to no end of contortions on the bike, very few of which are constructive, avoid this if poss; getting ya knee down without sliders is bad juju for ya knee
              . the body follows the head not the other way around, so if the head is getting where it needs to the rest will tend to follow (in a general sense); if you work on getting your chin closer to your inside hand on a corner (both down & across) this is a good start, small steps helps in allowing the brain to adjust & not freeze or freak out
              . if you can get 'off' the bike you also need to be able to recover from this posiition, not always easy if not used to it; locking your leg into the bike as mentioned above helps this enormously & is an excellent technique for many reasons
              . even a few mm change in position will feel like a huge change & really weird, look forward to a lot of this feeling, it's normal for mere mortals
              . one of the best bits of advice I got from coaches when learning, & the hardest advice to follow, was to relax. If you're tense this transfers into the bike & stuff feels worse, at the very least don't have a death grip on the bars as most of the 'feel' you need comes through your hands & a tight grip limits this; just breathe, peeps can tend to hold their breath when in an unfamiliar environment & feeling threatened
              . try to build into a rhythm, this will help you to relax a little, when learning & lacking confidence sharp movements tend to unsettle stuff. As the speed ramps up stuff needs to happen more quickly but rarely sharply, techiques remain the same but performed more rapidly
              . a lot of this will come very slowly as you get more laps in but will require a concerted effort to practice
              . the coaches at the track are an excellent resource, use them, ask questions, work on one thing at a time with the coaches, they often have limited time per person so be sucinct when asking for help
              . if you have time do the Advanced Rider Training course at the RAC track first, a gentler introduction to better bike control & helps with ya road riding too (when was the last time you practiced an emergency stop while leant over!)

              HTH
              .. and thats Racer # 193 to y'all; my fabulous sponsors (who all do good shit) are: Graeme Fleming IT Consultants, Vision Image, Pacific Safety Wear, Excess Power Equipment, Pro Photo Booth

              .. and according to Sean'o: 'get the Kwaka (never thought i would say that!)'

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kristy View Post
                My muscles are much tighter on my right side than my left which affects my body position on right handers :/ If I had physio before a track day it seemed a bit better.
                WOW!!!!!!!!!!

                Best I can do to describe the issue is this.
                Normally it goes BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR, shift, BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

                But now it's a bit more like this
                BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-R-R-r-r-r-r-r-, shift

                exan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Also helps to have some decent corner speed to get off. If your going to slow its very awkward to get into a decent body position as you are doing all the work to hold yourself there. The faster you go the more the G-Forces help you out and the easier it becomes.

                  Oh yea nothing about riding a bike fast is ever going to be easy but its so satisfying when you do have a good day.
                  The Bend

                  Hurry Up!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Corona 221 View Post
                    Also helps to have some decent corner speed to get off. If your going to slow its very awkward to get into a decent body position as you are doing all the work to hold yourself there. The faster you go the more the G-Forces help you out and the easier it becomes.

                    Oh yea nothing about riding a bike fast is ever going to be easy but its so satisfying when you do have a good day.
                    Or manipulate that tired sad mechanism ...you call a body to do things that , in your minds eye , look easy to MOTOGP riders.

                    Front and rear slide while waiting to get tyres up to temp.....well.

                    In your mind you are already willing the bike to go faster.. lean harder,accelerate more quickly....then somebody cruises past you ..and waves... ;-)

                    G force AND gyro...in perfect harmony.....mmmmm sweet!!
                    " Imagination is the seed of life..."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      LOL @ Rob... old dog indeed!

                      Road bike is an RC8, been fettled by Suspension Swami MMoose (as have all my road bikes over recent years) so it's set up well and is a very sweet steering bike.
                      I'll do the RACtrak day and see what feedback i get from that, then book a few more.

                      Are there any specific coaches that have been actively involved in developing riding style/body position with a long-time streetbike rider such as me?
                      PM if preferred, again more than happy to pay for the assistance/feedback.

                      S.
                      Chuck Norris is 1/8th Cherokee. This has nothing to do with ancestry, the man ate a fucking Indian.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All the Trakdayz and MCRCWA Ridedays coaches will help out as much as you want. Depending who is running the RAC day they should be able to help out but they aren't out there on a bike with you to see what your really doing. Get to barbs with either Trakdayz or Ridedays and hit one of the coaches up to check exactly what you are doing. They might just as well follow you as anyone else and if you actually ask they will be happy to pick you.
                        The Bend

                        Hurry Up!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The best advice I believe is to lead with your head and shoulders trying to get your head over the inside hand grip , once you're comfortable with this continue to align your spine parallel to the bike with you're head still over the inside grip. At this point you should be 1/2 to 1 cheek on the seat As you go faster it feels more natural. Keep the balls of your feet on the legs and put weight on the inside peg during cornering .

                          these are just the basics and I'd needs to follow you around to refine it for you.
                          Atlas Performance, dyna pumps, " your name goes here"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arwon View Post
                            The best advice I believe is to lead with your head and shoulders trying to get your head over the inside hand grip , once you're comfortable with this continue to align your spine parallel to the bike with you're head still over the inside grip. At this point you should be 1/2 to 1 cheek on the seat As you go faster it feels more natural. Keep the balls of your feet on the legs and put weight on the inside peg during cornering .

                            these are just the basics and I'd needs to follow you around to refine it for you.
                            Done deal... I wanna see the video improvement.....

                            Arwon... do me a huge fav......rebound...and tyre pressures first.. then follow...eh?

                            lowside fukup...will ruin that day...;-)

                            "Legs is .......pegs.. eh..?"

                            How do you brake n change gear???? boot heels ..( the bit 'tween the heel and the foot print..)on pegs!!!!...

                            mid foot near where tread is on boot.....all the same to you..? Setup levers n brake....g/change to suit..(good luck..)
                            " Imagination is the seed of life..."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Those gems change with speed and technique. So changes come with feedback

                              as for bike maintenance I expect people wanting to ride better should attend to their own bike first
                              Atlas Performance, dyna pumps, " your name goes here"

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